Saturday, June 20, 2009

quizballs 1 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
In which year were TV licences introduced in the UK? 1946
Which designer (brand) created the Kelly bag? Hermes
Arctic King, Saladin and Tom Thumb are which types of vegetable? Lettuce
By what name is the Gravelly Hill Interchange better known? Spaghetti Junction
The Galápagos Islands are a provincial territory of which South American country, 600 miles away on the same equatorial latitude? Ecuador
Which Gilbert and Sullivan operetta is sub-titled The Slave of Duty? The Pirates of Penzance
Who succeeded Sir Clive Woodward as England's rugby union coach? Andy Robinson
What is a baby oyster called? A Spat
What is Bill Clinton's middle name? Jefferson
In which country are the Sutherland Falls? New Zealand
In the US TV comedy show Everybody Loves Raymond, what is Raymond's bother's first name? Robert
What is the largest flat fish species? Halibut
What did Nelson lose on Tenerife in 1797? His arm (or right arm - up to you)
What's the oldest university in the USA? Harvard
Who became Germany's first female chancellor? Angela Merkel
Who wrote The Railway Children? Edith Nesbit
Who played the Ringo Kid in the original Stagecoach film? John Wayne
Which artist painted The Potato Eaters? Vincent Van Gogh
In architecture, what is a lancet? A window
Which singer's original name was Elaine Bookbinder? Elkie Brooks
Turin lies on which river? The Po
Which country has the international car registration RA? Argentina
A methuselah of wine holds the equivalent of how many bottles? Eight
Launched in 1960, what was the name of the first US communications satellite? Echo 1
Who invented jeans? Levi Strauss
What does a cartophilist collect? Cigarette cards
Which European city had the Roman name Lutetia? Paris
What is the green pigment found in most plants that is responsible for absorbing light energy? Chlorophyll
Yeomen Warders at the Tower of London are commonly known by what other name? Beefeaters
Which actress appears with Jarvis Cocker in Pulp's video, Common People? Sadie Frost
How many labours were performed by Hercules? Twelve
Which late MP owned Saltwood Castle in Kent? Alan Clarke
In which London pub did Ronnie Kray murder George Cornell? The Blind Beggar
What date is Trafalgar Day? 21 October
What is the birthstone for April? Diamond
What does 'E' represent in E = MC2? Energy
What note do orchestras typically tune up to? A
Which English cathedral was destroyed by fire in 1666? St Pauls
Who shot and killed Billy the Kid in 1881? Pat Garrett
What was the first name of Dustin Hoffman's female character in Tootsie? Dorothy
Which UK store was first to have an first escalator installed? Harrods
In which year (or decade) were luncheon vouchers introduced in the UK? 1955 (or 1950's - up to you)
How did soul singer Otis Redding die in 1967? Plane crash
Who invented the revolver (handgun)? Samuel Colt
In which ocean is Ascension Island? Atlantic
What is the USA state capital of California? Sacramento
In which country was cricketer Ted Dexter born? Italy
Who was the first English monarch to abdicate? Richard II
At which railway station was the film Brief Encounter made? Carnforth (Lancashire)
Who was the first British person to walk in space? Michael Foale
quizballs 2 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Who invented the jet engine in 1930? Frank Whittle
Which two countries are connected by the Simplon Pass? Switzerland and Italy
What is the US state capital of Mississippi? Jackson
What is Earth's atmospheric region of charged particles connecting the stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere? Ionosphere
Which artist said, "When we love a woman we don't start measuring her limbs" ? Pablo Picasso
What was Manfred von Richtofen's nickname? The Red Baron
What does a vexillogist study? Flags
Which is the largest of the Channel Islands? Jersey
Who wrote 'Far From The Madding Crowd'? Thomas Hardy
Who plays Grace in the US sitcom 'Will and Grace'? Debra Messing
At which golf course does the US Masters take place? Augusta (Georgia)
What does NATO stand for? North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Which is the largest Castle in England? Windsor Castle
In which month of the year is All Saints Day? November
In which English cathedral is the Bell Harry Tower? Canterbury
In which country was exiled Russian leader Leon Trotsky killed in 1940? Mexico
Who played Simon Templar in the 1997 film 'The Saint'? Val Kilmer
Which European country had the Roman name Helvetia? Switzerland
Which fashion items does Jimmy Choo design? Shoes
What is a blini? A Pancake
If a dish is 'a la crecy' with what is it garnished? Carrots
Which country has the international car registration ET? Egypt
What is the currency of Albania? The Lek
Which 1950's singer was originally names Charles Hardin? Buddy Holly
Which London station was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott? St Pancras
Which bird was named after engraver Sir Thomas Bewick? The Bewick Swan
What is the number 3.142 more usually known as? Pi (pronounced 'pie' - it represents the ratio of a circle's circumferance to its diameter, also expressed by the fraction 22/7, and the sixteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, pi, equating to 'p', and shown as the symbol p . The number 3.142 is a rounding to three decimal places; the full decimal number of pi is infinitely long and cannot be expressed absolutely other than as a fraction.
Who scored England's first goal in the 1998 World Cup Final tournament? Alan Shearer
Which is the largest of the Great Lakes? Lake Superior
Which British prime minister had a bag named after him? Gladstone
Majestic, Romano and Arran Victory are types of which vegetable? Potato
A firkin of beer holds how many gallons? Nine
What is the title of the film about a Scottish village that awakens once every 100 years? Brigadoon
In which year did Roger Bannister break the four-minute mile? 1954
In 1960 Dr Thomas Creighton was the first person to receive what punishment? A parking ticket
In which country was actor Mel Gibson born? USA
Whose autobiography is entitled 'Take It Like A Man? Boy George
What is the lightest metal? Lithium
What is the ninth letter of the Greek alphabet? Iota
What did the Warren Commission investigate in the US in the 1960's? The assassination of John F Kennedy
What is the Fahrenheit boiling point of water? 212 degrees
How many sides does a rhombus have? Four
Which is the smallest bone in the body? The stirrup (in the ear)
What is Adam's Ale commonly known as? Water
How many syllables are in a Haiku (a type of Japanese verse)? Seventeen
Who served the longest time in office as Poet Laureate? Tennyson (Alfred, Lord Tennyson, in office from 1850-92)
Which is the oldest football (soccer) club in London? Fulham (est. 1879)
What are the two ingredients in Bellini cocktail? Champagne and peach juice
Which playwright wrote 'The Crucible'? Arthur Miller
What do algophobics fear? Pain
quizballs 3 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
If a creature is 'opodous', what has is not got? Feet
What chemical element has the atomic number 18? Argon
What is the name of the character played by Angela Lansbury in 'Murder, She Wrote' ? Jessica Fletcher
What is the name of the hooked staff carried by a bishop called? A crozier
In which war was Agent Orange used by the USA? Vietnam (Agent Orange was a herbicide used to kill plants and remove leaves from trees that provided cover for the Vietcong soldiers. The name came from the orange stripe on the container drums.)
Who was the Greek God of dreams? Morpheus
Which American duo released an album titled Bookends? Simon and Garfunkel (1968)
What was boxer Barry McGuigan's weight division? Featherweight
What is 'nacre' commonly known as? Mother of Pearl
What is the fictional brewery associated with the Rovers Return pub in TV's Coronation Street serial? Newton and Ridley
What colour is the Mr Men character Mr Happy? Yellow
What does a hippophobic fear? Horses
Where is the Royal Navy Officer Training School? Dartmouth (Devon)
What is the best-selling book in the USA after the Holy Bible? Dr Spock's Baby and Child Care
Who had a hit single in the 1960's with 'C'mon Baby, Light My Fire'? The Doors
In which ocean are the Cape Verde Islands? Atlantic
How many bones are there in the human body? 206
What is the Lonicera plant commonly known as? Honeysuckle
'Rule Britannia' is the work of which composer? Thomas Arne
What does a 'vigneron' cultivate? Grapes (for wine-making)
Which creature in Greek mythology was half-man and half-bull? Minotaur
The Battle of Alma was fought during which war? The Crimean War (September 1854)
How much does Michael Henchard sell his wife and daughter for in Thomas Hardy's novel The Mayor of Casterbridge? Five Guineas
What are the two ingredients in a Rusty Nail cocktail? Whisky and Drambuie
Who became the first 'Children's Laureate' in 1999? Quentin Blake
How many players are there in a netball team? Seven
Who was the first poet to be buried in Poets Corner in London's Westminster Abbey? Geoffrey Chaucer
What is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet? Epsilon
Which comedian's autobiography is entitled 'The Full Monty' ? Jim Davidson
Introduced in New York in 1950 what was the first credit card? Diners Club
Which is the longest mountain range in the world? The Andes (7,240km)
What type of fruit would you pick from a Mirabelle tree? Plum
Who was Britain's first Labour Prime Minister? Ramsey MacDonald
Who painted 'The Laughing Cavalier' ? Franz Hals
Which famous guitarist's original name was Brian Rankin? Hank Marvin
What iconic symbol is the long-standing trademark and clip design of the Parker Pen Co? Arrow
With what is Earl Grey tea flavoured? Bergamot
What number is a hurricaine on the Beaufort Scale? 12
Who directed the film 'Alien' ? Ridley Scott (1979)
Which MP was killed by an IRA bomb in the House of Commons car park in 1979? Airey Neave
Which English Cathedral has the highest spire? Salisbury Cathedral (404 feet)
When is Bastille day celebrated? 14 July
What is the capital of Tasmania? Hobart
What does a 'spelunker' explore? Caves
Golda Meir was the famous female prime minister of which country? Israel (1969-74)
In which US city was the first Gap
quizballs 4 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
The character Shylock appears in which Shakespeare play? The Merchant Of Venice
Who released an album in 1999 called Brand New Day? Sting
If a creature is edentulous what has it not got? Teeth
What were the eldest sons of the Kings of France called? Dauphin
What is the fourth sign of the Zodiac? Cancer
Who is the Greek God of wine? Dionysus (Bacchus was the Roman God of wine)
P&O, the shipping line, stands for what? Peninsular and Oriental
What was Radar's surname in MASH? O'Reilly
What is the largest island in the world? Greenland
Who was the founder of the Body Shop company? Anita Roddick
In which year (decade) were parking meters introduced in the UK? 1958 (1950's)
Who wrote the novel Dracula? Bram Stoker
What is a baby seal called? A pup
What is the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain more popularly known as? Eros
What is the name of Don Quixote's horse? Rosinante (or Rocinante or Rozinante - all three versions arise in different editions of the book)
Which actresses play Rosemary and Thyme in the TV series about two gardening sleuths? Felicity Kendal and Pam Ferris
During which war was the Battle of Marne? First World War
In the human body what is Varicella commonly known as? Chicken Pox
How many valves does a trumpet have? Three
Brock is a nickname for which animal? A Badger
What is the name of the RAF's aerobatics team? The Red Arrows
Which football club did Alan Sugar own? Tottenham Hotspur (Spurs)
Who is the Roman Goddess of the hunt? Dianna
What type of creature is an alewife? A fish
What is the metal or plastic end of a shoelace called? An aglet
What is the world's third largest desert? The Gobi Desert (500,000 square miles)
What was Lancelot Brown famous for designing? Gardens (aka Capability Brown)
Which artist was born in Bradford in 1937? David Hockney
What was the BBC's first TV pop music programme? Six-Five Special
Which English city had the Roman name Camulodonum? Colchester
What is an ecdysiast? A striptease artist
What is the main vegetable ingredient in the dish Borsht? Beetroot
With which country did the UK have the long-running 'Cod War' disputes over fishing rights? Iceland
Who was given the name 'Fourth Man' when he was revealed as a spy in 1979? Anthony Blunt
Which two English Cathedrals have copies of the Magna Carta? Salisbury and Lincoln
How many years of marriage is celebrated on the Ivory anniversary? Fourteen
What famous landmark was moulded in gold during a bullion robbery in the 1951 film The Lavender Hill Mob? The Eiffel Tower
Who was known as the Sun King? Louis the Fourteenth
Who was the first American in space? Alan Shephard (5 May 1961)
How many players are there in an Australian Rules football team (on the field at the same time)? Eighteen (there are also four replacements on the bench who can be interchanged whenever during the game - thanks A Duffy)
Who invented the elevator in 1853? Elisha Otis
At which ski resort would you see the Cresta Run? St Moritz
In which English county is Scotney Castle? Kent
White Lion pubs are named after which English King's heraldic symbol? Edward the Fourth
What is the mouthpiece of a recorder called? A fipple
In which month is St Swithin's Day? July (15th)
What every-day item was named after Mrs Gamp in Charles Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit? The Umbrella
In what year did the USA adopt the Stars and Stripes flag? 1777
In which ocean are the Canary Islands? Atlantic
The authorised version of the Holy Bible was made at the order of which King? James the First (1611)
quizballs 5 - management and business quiz - free quiz questions and answers
Information about all of these subjects is on the businessballs website. A search tool is at the top of the page.

What psychological methodology does NLP stand for? Neuro-Linguistic Programming
David McLelland's motivational theory identified three principal motivational needs which he said each of us possesses to varying degrees, and which characterise our motivational behaviour; what are these three motivational needs? Achievement (n-ach), the need to achieve things; Authority/Power (n-pow), the need to have impact, influence and authority; and Affiliation (n-affil), the need for relationships, interaction and acceptance among other people (or words to similar effect as these definitions)
Which organisation produces the UK's ABC1C2 (etc) Social Grade Classifications Statistics? NRS Ltd (National Readership Survey)
What does the selling acronym AIDA stand for? Attention, Interest, Desire, Action
Who developed the 'Equity Theory' of job motivation in the 1960's? J Stacey Adams
What does the financial abbreviation P&L stand for? Profit and Loss (Profit and Loss Account)
Who developed the ten stages of corporate life cycle, starting with Courtship and Infancy and ending in Bureaucracy and Death? Dr Ichak Adizes
The Ansoff matrix correlates what two aspects of business development from the 'new' and 'existing' perspectives? Products and Markets
In selling and communications, what do 'open questions' generally achieve? Open questions gather information, improve understanding, and build rapport by encouraging the other person to talk and explain things, including how they feel about things.
Albert Mehrabian researched and published a now widely referenced set of statistics for the effectiveness of spoken communications; what three types of communication did he identify and what percentages for each did he attach to each type in terms of the percentage of meaning (or understanding) that each communication type conveyed from person to person in his study? Mehrabian's research stated that: 7% of meaning conveyed is in the words that are spoken; 38% of meaning conveyed is in the way that the words are said (paralinguistic); and 55% of meaning conveyed is in facial expression.
In business accounts and financial reporting, expenses which change according to scale of performance or usage or demand are known as what? Variable Costs
What is the name of Ingham and Luft's model and theory which deals with hidden and open areas of knowledge about a person? The Johari Window
The '360 degree' appraisal method collects feedback from whom, about whom? A '360 Degree' feedback appraisal collects the views from people who work with the appraisee, about the appraisee, including subordinates, peers, upline managers; effectively anyone who comes into contact with the appraisee and who is happy to provide constructive feedback about the appraisee's strengths and areas for improvement
What are the four levels of learning evaluation defined in Donald Kirkpatrick's model? 1. Enjoyment; 2. Transfer of learning; 3. Application of learning; 4. Effect of application (or words to the same effect as these four definitions)
What is the correct ascending order of these human needs according to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: Esteem, Safety, Belongingness and Love, Self-Actualisation, Biological and Physiological? Biological and Physiological Needs (basic life needs - shelter, food, drink, sleep, etc); Safety Needs (security, protection, law, etc); Belongingness and Love Needs (family, affection, relationships, etc); Esteem Needs (achievement, status, responsibility, reputation, etc); Self-Actualisation (personal growth, self-fulfilment, etc)
What part of our brains typically handles process-type functions, according to brain theorists such as Katherine Benziger? Left Basal (left rear)
What does the accounting acronym FIFO mean? First In First Out (a convention for writing down the balance sheet value of assets of the same type - oldest are written-off first)
One of the most effective and efficient forms of marketing is abbreviated to the initials WOM; what is it? Word Of Mouth
Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains divides learning development into three main aspects: Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor; what might these three aspects of personal development more commonly be called? Knowledge, Attitude, Skills
Who wrote the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People? Dr Stephen Covey
The 'Big Five' personality dimensions, by which modern day psychologists believe every person's personality and behaviour tendencies can be measured are commonly abbreviated to the OCEAN acronym; what does OCEAN stand for? Openness to experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion/introversion, Agreeableness, Neuroticism.
What are the four metaphorical terms used to describe products/services in Boston Matrix model according to market share and market maturity? Dog, Cash Cow, Problem Child and Star (or Rising Star)
The financial ratio which divides a company's 'liquid assets' by 'current liabilities' is known by what popular term? Acid Test (or 'Quick Ratio')
What three important things should be confirmed and understood before conducting a brainstorming ideas session? The purpose or aim of the exercise; a time limit; the fact that all ideas are welcome and to be respected (ie., sometimes the craziest-sounding ideas are the best ones).
What does the SWOT stand for in SWOT analysis? Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats
What are the 'Four Functional Types' within Carl Jung's theory? Thinking, Feeling, Sensation, Intuition
With what was the Kyoto Summit concerned? Global climate change (in other words, greenhouse gas emissions)
What are the four sequential stages of the 'conscious competence' learning model? 1. Unconscious Incompetence, 2. Conscious Incompetence, 3. Conscious Competence, 4. Unconscious Competence
What is the '1st Law of Cybernetics' (aka the 'Law of Requisite Variety')? "The unit within the system with the most behavioural responses available to it controls the system." (or words to that effect)
What are the four main 'Temperament' types called within David Keirsey's Temperaments personality theory? Artisan, Idealist, Guardian, Rational/Rationalist
According to the Tannenbaum and Schmidt theory relating to delegation and team development, what must be reduced in order for the team's area of freedom (and growth) to increase? The manager's use of authority
What does the financial term ROI stand for? Return On Investment
Whose experiential learning theory comprises the learning styles named: Concrete Experience (feeling); Abstract Conceptualization (thinking); Active Experimentation (doing); and Reflective Observation (watching)? David Kolb
Daniel Goleman was responsible for popularising and defining what management and behavioural concept in his eponymously titled (ie., the title is also the subject) 1995 book? Emotional Intelligence
What is psychometrics? The science of measuring (or testing) personality type (or mental abilities)
What is the management technique that is commonly abbreviated to MBWA? Management By Walking About (or Wandering Around) - the term is generally attributed to Tom Peters (In Search Of Excellence, 1982) although it was probably part of a new management ideology first pioneered by a few bright American companies as far back as the 1940's
Large size hand-writing generally indicates what characteristics in the personality of the writer? Extraverted or out-going nature
Since October 2004, UK employers must follow a minimum process of three-stages for handling disputes with employees, including disciplinary and grievance matters; what are the basic minimum three stages required? 1. Write a letter to the employee explaining the issue; 2. Have a meeting with the employee to discuss the issue; 3. Hold or offer an appeal meeting with the employee if required.
Douglas McGregor defined two main styles of management; what did he call them and how are each of the two styles typified? X-Theory (or Theory-X) which is authoritarian, autocratic and repressive; and Y-Theory (or Theory-Y) which is participative, delegating, and developmental (or words to similar effect as these two descriptions)
Bruce Tuckman's theory about team development uses what four sequential rhyming words to describe the four stages of a group's progression? Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing
What are Howard Gardner's seven (original) Multiple Intelligences? Linguistic (words and language), Logical-Mathematical (logic and numbers), Musical (music, sound, rhythm), Bodily-Kinesthetic (body movement control), Spatial-Visual (images and space), Interpersonal (other people's feelings), Intrapersonal (self-awareness)
According to Herzberg's motivational theory, which of these are 'hygiene needs' (or 'maintenance factors') and which are true 'motivators': work conditions, salary, achievement, advancement, work itself, responsibility, company car, status, recognition, and personal growth? Of the examples listed, hygiene needs are: work conditions, salary, company car, status. True motivators in the list are achievement, recognition, work itself, responsibility, advancement, and personal growth.
What does VAK stand for in the learning styles theory? Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic/Kinaesthetic (three different learning styles or methods - seeing, listening, doing)
What does the business acronym IPO stand for? Initial Public Offering, meaning the initial sale of privately owned equity (stock or shares) in a company via the issue of shares to the public and other investing institutions
What does the PEST stand for in PEST analysis? Political, Economical, Social, Technological
What do 'open questions' typically begin with? Open questions typically begin with Who, What, How, When, Where, and Why, (or for particularly capable or intelligent respondents, 'Tell me about...')
What visionary management thinker wrote The Age Of Unreason and The Empty Raincoat? Charles Handy
What are the names of the (nine) Belbin 'team roles'? Coordinator (was called 'Chairman'), Shaper, Plant, Monitor-Evaluator, Implementer (was called 'Company Worker'), Resource Investigator, Team Worker, Completer-Finisher, Specialist
In marketing, what are the The Four P's? Product, Price, Promotion, Place.
A lot of the traditional 20th century sales theory and training was influenced by the 1937 book 'How to Win Friends and Influence People'; who wrote it? Dale Carnegie.
quizballs 6 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
The headquarters of Greenpeace is in which European city? Amsterdam
Which famous artist and inventor died at Amboise Castle in France, 1519? Leonardo da Vinci
In what year did Mother Teresa of Calcutta win the Nobel Peace Prize? 1979
Which was the first European country to give all women the vote? Finland (or as then, the Grand Duchy of Finland) was the first European country to extend the vote to all women, and incidentally to allow full female parliamentary candidature. This first European genuine 'full female universal suffrage' remained when Finland because fully independent in 1917. In 1881 the Isle of Man, a country within the British Isles and a British Crown dependency, attempted to introduce the vote for all women, but after pressure from the UK Home Office the Isle of Man government was forced to dilute its 1880 Election Bill so that the vote was extended only to women rate-payers (i.e., women owners of real estate)
What type of creature is a Garibaldi? A fish
What colour is the gemstone garnet? Red (dark red)
Which sign of the Zodiac are people born on 30th October? Scorpio
What type of weapon is a Falchion? A sword
Which pub in Nottingham claims to be the oldest in Britain? The Trip To Jerusalem
By what name was world champion boxer Walker Smith better known? Sugar Ray Robinson
Mount Elbert is the highest peak in which mountain range? The Rockies (USA)
Edward II was murdered in Berkeley Castle in 1327, in which county is Berkeley Castle? Gloucestershire
Which American horse race is run at Churchill Downs? The Kentucky Derby
What type of food is Quark? Cheese
Which Alex Graham cartoon appears in the Daily Mail newspaper? Fred Basset
What is the collective noun for a group of crows? A murder
Who discovered the smallpox vaccination? Edward Jenner (1796)
What did Harry Beck design in 1931 and is still used in London today? The map of the London Tube system (the Underground)
What is the chemical symbol for the element Potassium? K
What is the name of the dog in Enid Blyton's Famous Five books? Timmy
Who released an album entitled The Six Wives of Henry VIII? Rick Wakeman
What was the codename of the Allied forces landing at Normandy in 1944? Overlord
In the human body what is the Axilla commonly known as? The armpit
Who plays Lynette Scavo in the TV series Desperate Housewives? Felicity Huffman
How many finger holes does a tin whistle (pennywhistle) have? Six
What famous London building is officially called 1 Canada Square? Canary Wharf Tower
Which tennis player was stabbed by a Steffi Graf fan while playing in Hamburg 1993? Monica Seles
What was the nuclear power station Sellafield previously known as? Windscale
Swansea is situated on which river? The Tawe
In the Bible's New Testament what was the last battle between good and evil before the day of judgement? Armageddon
To what note is the top string on a six-string guitar normally tuned? E
What trophy is played for at the US Superbowl? The Lombardi Trophy
In what year did Margaret Thatcher become Prime Minister? 1979
What film was the first sequel to win a Best Picture Oscar? The Godfather Part II
Who shot Martin Luther King in 1968? James Earl Ray
Who was Britain's first Christian martyr (an English town is named after him)? St Alban
Which country has the largest malt whisky distillery in the world? Japan (the Suntory Distillery)
What was Hiram Hackenbacker's nickname in Thunderbirds? Brains
What is the person called who leads prayers in a mosque? The Imam
What is a 'half-hunter'? A type of pocket watch
Which British organisation was founded by Octavia Hill in 1895? The National Trust
What number did motorcycle racer Barry Sheen have on his bike? Seven
How tall is the Leaning Tower of Pisa? 190 feet (58 metres)
What was the name of the Spanish conquistador who conquered Mexico in 1519? Hernando Cortez
What is the capital of Liberia? Monrovia
When is St Andrew's Day? 30th November
What type of game is Faro? A card game
Which team was the first to score a 'Golden Goal' in the soccer World Cup Finals? France
Which Verdi opera is also a popular acronym used in the advertising and selling professions? Aida (pronounced 'eye-ee-da' - the acronym, AIDA, pronounced like it's spelt, stands for Attention, Interest, Desire, Action, also known as the 'hierarchy of effects', is a reverse interpretation of the buying process.)
What does a belonophobic fear? Needles
- free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Who was the first Tudor King of England? Henry VII (1485-1509)
What colour is the gemstone kunzite? Lilac (or mauve)
If a British infantry soldier has three stripes on his uniform on his wedding day what rank does he normally hold? Corporal (traditionally a solider is made up one rank for his wedding day)
In what year was the Sex Discrimination Act passed in the UK? 1975
What word represents the letter J in the UK Police radio communications? Juliet
Tanner was the slang term for which pre-decimal British coin? Sixpence (or sixpenny piece)
What colour berets do the New York City crime-fighters the 'Guardian Angels' wear? Red (founded 1979)
Eddie Shah's 1988 newspaper 'Post' folded after how many issues? Thirty-three
During the siege of which African city did General Gordon die? Khartoum
Which artist's autobiography is titled 'Exploration of the Soul'? Tracey Emin
What type of creature is a gadwall? A duck
What date of the year is Burns Night? 25th of January
Which member of England's 2003 Rugby World Cup winning team has an uncle in the 1966 England Soccer World Cup winning team? Ben Cohen (the uncle is George Cohen)
Which sixteenth century German astronomer was reputed to have sold his soul to the devil? Johann Faust
In which English castle did King John die in 1216? Newark
What is the second book of the Bible's Old Testament? Exodus
What note appears twice in the conventional tuning of a six string guitar? E (top and bottom strings are E, two octaves apart)
Who in Greek mythology fell in love with his own reflection? Narcissus
Which rock band released an album Beggars Banquet? The Rolling Stones (1968)
What are musophobics afraid of? Mice
What is the name of the photographer famous for taking pictures of crowds of naked people? Spencer Tunick
What is the largest artery in the human body? The aorta
How many strings does a ukelele have? Four
Who was the 'teacher' in TV's Rock School? Gene Simmons (of Kiss)
What does BAFTA stand for? British Academy of Film and Television Arts
Which author died at Astapova railway station in 1910? Leo Tolstoy
Which sporting duo was coached by Betty Calloway? (Jane) Torville and (Christopher) Dean
What does a copoclephilist collect? Keyrings
Mount Vinson Massif is the highest peak in which continent? Antarctica
Who was appointed the first woman cabinet minister in the UK? Margaret Bondfield (Minister of Labour, 1929)
Alicante, Golden Boy and Piranto are types of what? Tomato
Who wrote the novel Bonfire of the Vanities? Tom Wolfe
In which year was the first Miss World contest held? 1951
Who was Sherlock Holmes' housekeeper? Mrs Hudson
How many square yards are in a British acre? 4,840
What is the white of an egg called? Albumen
Who played Professor Marcus in the 1955 film, The Ladykillers? Alec Guinness
In which year was TV's Channel 4 launched? 1982
What are kept in an apiary? Bees
What poisonous chemical element has the atomic number 33? Arsenic
Which country has the longest coastline? Canada (152,100 miles)
What is the fourteenth letter of the Greek alphabet? Xi
What fish family is the anchovy a member of? Herring
Who was the first person to cross the English Channel in a plane? Louis Bleriot
How many gun-firings salute the Queen's Birthday at the Tower of London? Sixty-two
What nationality was the artist Edvard Munch? Norwegian
Munich is on which river? The Isar
Which fashion designer introduced the Polo label in 1967? Ralph Lauren
In which Bavarian town is the Passion Play performed every ten years? Oberammergau
What is Hanson's disease commonly known as? Leprosy

quizballs 8 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
India qualified for the Soccer World Cup in 1950 but were refused permission to take part; why? Because the players were not permitted to play in bare feet.
The word 'anserine' relates to which type of birds? Geese
What year was Inheritance Tax introduced in the UK? 1986
What is the art of Japanese flower arranging called? Ikebana
Which artist sculpted the lions at the foot of London's Nelson's Column? (Sir Edwin Henry) Landseer
In 1983 which film did Barbra Streisand co-write, direct, produce and star in? Yentl
In electronics what does LED stand for? Light Emitting Diode
Who was the first person to reach the South Pole? Roald Amundsen (1911)
If an object is hastate what shape is it? Triangular
What character did Beyonce Knowles play in the 2002 film Goldmember? Foxxy Cleopatra
What is the name of the publishers run by women for women? Virago
Who was the first person to have a blue plaque conferred on the house where he was born in Holly Street, Westminster, London? Lord Byron
What US gangster's original name was Lester Gillis? Baby Face Nelson
What is the world's largest sea? South China Sea
What year did TV Soap Eastenders begin? 1985
What is the first sign of the Zodiac? Aries
Who is the Greek Goddess of Victory? Nike
Who wrote the book Brave New World? Aldous Huxley
Which musician received the first gold disc, in 1941? Glen Miller (Chattanooga Choo-choo)
Which country had the first Women's Institute, in 1897? Canada
On which part of the body would you wear a deer-stalker? The head
Which King was the target of the Rye House Plot? Charles II
Which type of beans are used to make baked beans? Haricot beans
What musical aid did trumpeter John Shore invent in 1711? The tuning fork
What is the technical term for the collar bone? The clavicle
Which group achieved a UK number one chart position with the same song in the years 1975, 1976, 1991 and 1992? Queen (Bohemian Rhapsody)
Which twins were said to be the founders of Rome? Romulus and Remus
Adam's Needle is another name for which plant? The Yukka
Which prime minister took the UK into the EEC (as was then called)? Edward Heath
What is a person who shoes horses called? Farrier
Haldi is the Indian name for which spice? Turmeric
What colour is the cabbage moth? Brown
Dendrology is the scientific study of what? Trees
Who won the men's singles at Wimbledon in 1987? Pat Cash
How many miles per second does light travel? 186,000
Which American artist was awarded damages of one farthing after John Ruskin's criticism of his work provoked a lawsuit? James Whistler
What does a gricer take photographs of? Trains
Who played Mr White in the 1991 film Reservoir Dogs? Harvey Keitel
How long is Johnny Walker Black Label whisky matured for? 12 years
Which designer was awarded a best fashion design Oscar in 1985? Yves Saint-Laurent
Who wrote the opera 'The Barber of Seville? Rossini (1816)
What is the capital of Finland? Helsinki
Who was the last Aztec Emperor? Montezuma (II)
Which US organisation's headquarters is situated in Langley, Virginia? The CIA
Who was the first chancellor of the 20th century united Germany? Helmut Kohl
Madarosis is the absence or loss of which part of the body? Eyelashes
Who played Candice Stowe in TV's Coronation Street? Nikki Sanderson
In which sport would a niblick be used? Golf
The Capets were the rules of which European country? France
Who was the first woman editor of the Radio Times? Sue Robinson

quizballs 9 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
What is a perfect diamond of 100 carats or more called? A paragon
What does RIBA stand for? Royal Institute of British Architects
A toponym is a name of what? A place
How many books make up the Bible's Old Testament? Thirty-nine
In what year was Joan of Arc burned at the stake? 1431
How many times did Nick Faldo win the Masters golf tournament? Three (1989/90/96)
Who founded Playboy magazine in 1953? Hugh Hefner
Which artist was married to Hortense Fiquet? Paul Cezanne
During which war was the Battle of Cold Harbour? The American Civil War (1864)
Who plays Jim Morrison in the 1991 film 'The Doors'? Val Kilmer
In which country are the Churchill Falls? Canada (Labrador)
'Angels on horseback' are what wrapped in bacon? Oysters
What traditionally symbolises a couple's sixth wedding anniversary? Sugar
Which English Cathedral houses the Sleeping Children statue? Lichfield
What make and model of car was John F Kennedy in when assassinated in 1963? Lincoln Continental
What is the name in John Travolta's character in Saturday Night Fever? Tony Manero
What does a phullumenist collect? Matchbox labels
The Madhouse is a work by which artist? Goya
What planet is nearest to the Sun? Mercury
Who was the first Roman Emperor? Augustus Caesar
In which year was the first FIFA World Cup held? 1930 (in Uruguay - Uruguay beat Argentina 4-2)
What is Canada's highest mountain? Mount Logan
Which vegetable is also known as an egg plant? Aubergine
In Greek mythology who persuaded her brother to kill their mother in revenge for the murder of their father? Electra
What is a tree or shrub called that sheds its leaves annually? Deciduous
How many players are in a basketball team? Five
In the natural world what is a Camberwell Beauty? A butterfly
What does a hagiographer write about? Saints
In which month is United Nations Day? October (24th)
In which English town was the TV drama Middlemarch made? Stamford
An Eskimo roll would be seen in which sport? Kayaking
By which nickname was Edward Teach known? Blackbeard
Which is the largest Canary Island? Tenerife
Which Sunday newspaper was founded by John Browne Bell in 1843? News Of The World
What is the male part of a flower called? The stamen
How many teeth does an elephant have? Four
Which duo had a 1982 UK chart hit with Save Your Love? Renee and Renato
What does a phyllophobic fear? Leaves
Reynard is a nickname for which animal? The fox
In which country was tennis player John McEnroe born? Germany
Which designer launched the Warehouse chain of stores? Jeff Banks
What spirit is used to make a daquari? Rum
Who wrote the novel The Boys From Brazil? Ira Levin
Which UK city had the first public library? Norwich (1608)
What is an Aldis Lamp used for? Signalling (Morse code)
What country has the international car registration letters TR? Turkey
Warsaw lies on which river? The Vistula
Which vitamin, considered by some experts to be a hormone, is activated in the human body by Sunshine? D
Apart from London which three other cities in Britain have an underground railway system? Glasgow, Liverpool, Newcastle
Which international rugby player appeared in the January 2006 Matalan fashion brochure? Gavin Henson
quizballs 10 - basic management and business quiz - free quiz questions and answers
Which of these is a 'soft' skill? Analysing, Monitoring, Budgeting, Counselling? Counselling. ('Soft' skills typically involve people and communications).
Integrity is essential in all functions, but is it most crucial in supervision, management, or leadership? Leadership. (Leadership which lacks integrity can bring down an entire corporation).
Staff performance appraisals work best if they are strictly an annual event - true or false? False. (A person's performance and progress and project work, etc., benefit enormously from more frequent appraisal discussions than once a year. Informal appraisals can be conducted as frequently as is helpful. Obviously the more frequent, the less formal, which is another benefit.)
Which tends to produce the highest percentage gross profit: mature high-volume products or new low-volume specialised services? New low-volume specialised services. (Mature markets tend to be more competitive which compresses pricing and margins. Mature products also have to be priced competitively to enable volume distribution, and to resist threats from newer better solutions. High-volume production requires competitive pricing in order to the maintain volumes necessary to support related large scale investment. Additionally customers and buyers are more informed and price-sensitive in mature markets.)
For effective time management what's the best frequency for checking your email inbox: constantly, every hour, two or three times a day? Two or three times a day. (Constant interruptions and distractions are extremely unhelpful for all proactive work, especially thinking, communicating, creating, planning, project managing, etc. Many organisations have developed the weird practice of continuous email checking or alerting, but that doesn't make it right. It's a question of managing your environment rather than let it manage you.)
It is said that "If you can't measure it then you can't..." what? Manage it.
Abraham Maslow developed the Hierarchy of what? Needs.
What does MBO or MBO's stand for? Management By Objectives.
A subordinate has raised a personal issue with you by email which is causing him/her obvious distress - what's the best means of communicating from this point: email, phone, face-to-face, text, letter? Face-to-face (in private). (It's extremely difficult to understand people - and to be understood - without face-to-face spoken communications. This is because tone of voice and body language, especially facial expressions, carry more meaning than words in all but obvious unemotional communications.
Putting interviewees under a lot of pressure at job interviews is generally helpful to the process of finding out about the person - true or false? False. (The purpose of interviews is to discover as much as possible about the person. When people are under pressure they clam up and/or mask their true characteristics. Interviews are artificial and pressurising enough without deliberately making them any more so.)
Experiential learning is most beneficial to people who have a visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learning style preference? Kinesthetic (Also spelled Kinaesthetic. A person who prefers this style favours 'hands-on' learning. For effective teaching, training, development, etc., using an appropriate style of learning for the learner is as important as the learning content itself.)
Which is likely to motivate an enthusiastic capable team member most: doubling their target, agreeing additional responsibility, a bonus payment, a new car? Agreeing additional responsibility. (None of the others actually changes anything sustainably and purposefully in terms of what the person does, which crucially is linked to true achievement and growth.)
What's a simple way to find out the causes if staff turnover (number of people leaving) has gone through the roof in the last two months? Carry out exit interviews with the people leaving and ask them. (People are at their most revealing when the ties have been cut. Added to which you are not dealing with rumour or opinions as might surface in staff surveys. Instead, exit interviews deal in facts, and enable very useful analysis if conducted with a reasonable number of leavers. Incidentally, staff turnover is normally shown as a percentage arrived at by dividing total leavers by total workforce. As a very broad guide, anything over 20% staff turnover in a year suggests serious problems. Anything less than 10% per year suggests stagnation.)
A company has a turnover of £11m. Its 'cost of sales' or 'cost of goods sold' (COGS) is £6.3m. Its overheads including fixed costs, depreciation (write-down of capital items) and any interest charges (on borrowings) are £3.5m. What is the company's percentage gross profit and percentage net profit before tax, and is this profit % for a company very high, very low or somewhat typical? 42.7% and 10.9%, and it's somewhat typical. Explanation: Gross profit is Turnover less COGS (£11m less £6.3m) = £4.7m. Percentage Gross Profit (or 'gross margin') is £Gross Profit divided by Turnover (£4.7m ÷ £11m) = 42.7% . Net Profit before tax is Gross Profit less Overheads (£4.7m less £3.5m) = £1.2m. Percentage Net Profit is £Net Profit divided by £Turnover (£1.2m ÷ £11m) = 10.9%. Anything around 10% is a typical sort of net profit percentage achieved by businesses and corporations, although this perspective is just a simple hypothetical 'P&L' (profit and loss account) and takes no account of balance sheet or cash aspects, which together with the P&L provide the three main measures of business performance.
What acronym is useful when delegating a task to someone or agreeing an objective? SMART (Specific, Measurable, Agreed/Achievable, Realistic/Relevant, Timebound) - or extended to SMARTER (Specific, Measurable, Agreed/Achievable, Realistic/Relevant, Timebound, Ethical/Enjoyable, Recorded. It is important that 'agreed' is part of delegation process.)
If you assume responsibility for a mature, high-achieving confident team, which of the following is generally the best approach to take: stamp your authority on the group; introduce some new ideas of your own; give them space and make yourself available if needed; or look for ways to cut costs? Give them space and make yourself available if needed. (A mature, high-achieving confident team can virtually run itself - which is every team-manager's aim. Why go backwards? If you start micro-managing or interfering you will waste your time that you could have otherwise used on strategic creative developments and opportunities, and you will upset the team members. Your priority is to understand the team so as to help them develop, ideally including the development of a successor for yourself. This will enable you to move on to your next opportunity.)
What's the relevance of hobbies on a person's CV? A person's hobbies often indicate their strengths, potential and character, aside from and beyond what might be suggested by their work experience and qualifications. A person's hobbies also give you the chance to get them talking about things they feel passionate about, by which you can often discover more about someone than discussing their work or qualifications.
What can 'closed' questions be used for? Getting yes/no answers; getting commitment (or 'closing' in selling); clarifying, qualifying and filtering. Ask a closed question if you need a short quick answer. If you want information and to listen and learn then ask 'open' questions (who, how, what, where, etc).
When planning the running order for a meeting is it generally best to put the big important items first or last or in the middle between smaller things? Big important agenda items should always go last - if you put them first you risk not having time left for all the small things, which could otherwise have been polished off quite quickly and easily, especially because people will be keen to get to the juicier items afterwards. Also people tend to do more posturing early in meetings - to 'have their say' even if they have nothing to say - which causes more problems for the big issues than the small ones. Later on in meetings, the dynamics and the emotions will typically have settled down a bit, which makes it easier to deal with the bigger issues. If there are other factors (guests with limited time availability for example) you'll need to schedule accordingly, but generally it's best to cover the small things first. Ensure you leave adequate time for the big items later, which means strictly managing the time used for the early small things.
When conducting appraisals or counselling sessions it's best to sit at your desk with the other person facing you on the other side, so as to reinforce your authority - true or false? False. (Similar to job interviews - you want the other person to be relaxed and comfortable, not threatened. Desks create barriers; so sit around a low coffee table instead. Sitting directly opposite facing each other is a confrontational arrangement; it's best to sit at an angle of between 90-120 degrees; or think of 12:15 or 12:20 on the clockface. Using any method to reinforce or impose authority will increase emotions, which undermines the value of the communications.)

quizballs 11 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
The Queensberry Rules are standard rules of which sport? Boxing
From which of Shakespeare's plays does the term 'salad days' originate? Anthony and Cleopatra
Which perfume house launched the 'Joy' perfume in 1930? Patou (founded by designer Jean Patou)
In heraldry what colour is sable? Black
What type of fruit is a canteloupe? Melon
Which English artist was president of the Royal Academy in 1768? Sir Joshua Reynolds
Who played the Riddler in the 1995 film Batman Forever? Jim Carey
What is the fifth sign of the Zodiac? Leo
Who invented the steam engine? Thomas Newcomen (1712)
Which artist painted The Watering Place? Thomas Gainsborough
Which explorer gave Natal its name on Christmas Day 1497? Vasco da Gama
An orchidectomy is the surgical removal of what? Testicles
What is the name of a word which reads the same backwards as forwards? Palindrome
What does an ocularist make? Artificial eyes
An ennead is a group or set of how many? Nine
What do the US Marine Corps, the city of Exeter and Plymouth Argyle FC have in common? The same motto (Semper Fidelis, Always Faithful)
In which castle was Charles I imprisoned from 1647-48? Carisbrooke Castle
What chemical element has the symbol Fe? Iron
What is a Maori ceremonial war-dance called? Haka
What salad is named after the Mexican Restaurateur who invented it? Caesar Salad (after Caesar Cardini)
Who became US president after Abraham Lincoln was assassinated? Andrew Johnson
Which city hosted the 1992 Summer Olympic games? Barcelona
In which year did the Gunpowder Plot take place? 1605
Who was the original presenter of TV's University Challenge? Bamber Gascoigne
Who was known as Little Sparrow? Edith Piaf
What is the minimum alcohol content under EU laws? 7%
From which English county do Bakewell tarts (technically 'Bakewell puddings') originate? Derbyshire
What type of creature is a bandy-bandy? Snake
What is the largest gland in the human body? The liver
Who played Tom Hanks' wife in the film The Burbs? Carrie Fisher
Which Hindu God is depicted with the head of an elephant? Ganesha
What is the young of a rabbit called? Kit
What is the collective name for a large number of islands? Archipelago
Peanuts is the work of which cartoonist? Charles Shulz
Who wrote the story The Old Man And The Sea? Ernest Hemingway
In which US city was the first juke-box installed, in the Palais Royal Saloon, 1889? San Francisco
Which British Prime Minister's mother, Jenny Jerome, invented the Manhattan cocktail? Winston Churchill
What was the first underground railway line in London? The Metroplitan Line (Paddington to Farringdon, 1863)
Which sea has no land borders? The Sargasso Sea
What is the currency of Iran? Rial (= 100 Dinars)
Who is the Roman God of the sea? Neptune
What does the H in H-Bomb stand for? Hydrogen
Which actress is the voice of Homer Simpson's mother? Glenn Close
Lexicology is the study of what? Words
In which country is Interpol based? France
What is the line called behind which darts players stand when throwing? Oche (pronounced 'ocky')
Who was the first leader of Polish trade union Solidarity? Lech Walesa
Martial art Jeet Kune was devised by which US actor? Bruce Lee
Which pope commissioned Michelangelo to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel? Pope Julius II (1508)
Neroli is an essential oil distilled from the flowers of which fruit? Orange (Seville)
quizballs 12 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Who wrote the novel, Treasure Island? Robert Louis Stevenson
In which country was ex-England cricket captain Tony Greig born? South Africa
What was Tom Jones' first UK number one single? It's Not Unusual
Which South American country lost its coastline to Chile in 1879? Bolivia (It still keeps its navy - on a lake)
What flavour is the liqueur cassis? Blackcurrant
What product was the first to appear in a UK TV commercial (in 1955)? Toothpaste (Gibbs SR)
Which artist is famous for painting a portrait of his mother? James Whistler (the painting is known as 'Whistler's Mother', referred to by many as 'Portrait of the artist's mother', and its full correct title is 'Arrangement in Grey and Black: The Artist's Mother')
Which singer was known as the 'Forces' Sweetheart'? Vera Lynn
What does a lepidopterist collect? Butterflies (and moths)
What was Genevieve in the 1953 film of the same name? A classic car (a French 'Darracq' built in Paris in 1904)
In which UK cathedral is the Whispering Gallery? St Pauls
What are Blue Mountain, Caturra, and Mocca types of? Coffee
What was the name of the family in TV's Upstairs Downstairs? Bellamy
What type of ape is found on the Rock of Gibraltar? Barbiary Ape
In the human body what is the Trachea? Windpipe
What does an acrophobic fear? Heights
Entomology is the study of which creatures? Insects
What is the pole called which is used for propelling a barge or punt? A quant
In which UK county is Hever Castle? Kent
What colours are the flowers of the flax plant? Blue
When is St Patrick's Day celebrated? 17th March
What is a village without a church called? A hamlet
Which male singing voice is between tenor and bass? Baritone
In German mythology what is the name of the siren who lived on a rock and lured boatmen to their deaths? Lorelei
In what year were dog licences abolished in England? 1988
What type of leaves does a silkworm feed on? Mulberry
Which UK newspaper had the first colour supplement? Sunday Times (4th Feb 1962)
What type of creature is a mouthbrooder? A fish
What colour is the Misterman Mr Worry? Blue
Which group had three consecutive UK Christmas number ones in 1996, 97 and 98? Spice Girls
In which sport do Great Britain and the USA compete for the Westchester Cup? Polo
In which war was the Battle of Bosworth Field? Wars of the Roses (August 1485 - "A horse, a horse,... etc")
Who wrote the opera Cosi fan Tutte? Mozart (1790)
Who generally credited with having invented the telephone? Alexander Graham Bell (1876 - in fact the full background to the invention of the telephone is quite complex. Antonio Meucci filed a patent caveat in December 1874, which described voice communication by wire. He renewed the caveat for two years, but then let it lapse in 1874 due to lack of funds. On February 14, 1876, Elisha Gray filed a patent caveat for transmitting human voice through a telegraph circuit - essentially a telephone. Alexander Graham Bell apparently saw the patent before it was processed and submitted his own the same day. )
What is the US state capital of Arizona? Phoenix
In which century was the first recorded Viking raid on England? 8th century (793 AD)
Olfactory relates to which of the senses? Smell
Rome is on which river? The Tiber
What was the name of the bottled water launched by Coca-Cola and then withdrawn? Dasani
Which side of a coin is obverse, heads or tails? Heads
What word represents the letter K in radio communications? Kilo
Who was the first Plantagenet King of England? Henry the Second (1154-89)
In the TV series Run For Glory which two former Olympic athletes train a group of novice runners? Steve Cram and Sally Gunnell
Which mountain was known as Peak XV until 1865? Mount Everest
Who was the first American to orbit the Earth? John Glenn (20 February 1962)
Who was the Prime Minister of Britain at the start of the First World War? Herbert Asquith
How many players are in an American Football team? Eleven
What was the title of Madonna's 1992 book? Sex
What are the two ingredients of a screwdriver cocktail? Vodka and orange juice
What does NAAFI stand for in the British forces? Navy Army and Air Force Institutes
quizballs 13 - free 'connections' quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
The last letter of each answer is the first letter of the succeeding answer.

In which month is St David's Day celebrated? March
New York is on which river? Hudson
On which planet is the Great Dark Spot? Neptune
Which famous London sculpture is the work of Sir Alfred Gilbert? Eros
In which English county is Nunney Castle? Somerset
An icosahedron is a three-dimensional form with how many faces? Twenty
What colour are the flowers on the St John's Wort? Yellow
What is the young of an otter called? Whelp
What 'colour' was actor Steve Buscemi in the film Reservoir Dogs? Pink
What chemical element has the symbol Kr? Krypton
What word is the opposite of zenith? Nadir
Which character did Dustin Hoffman play in the film Midnight Cowboy? Ratso
Joan of Arc is also known as the 'Maid of..' where? Orleans
What type of animal is a Border Leicester? Sheep
In anatomy what is the technical term for the kneecap? Patella
Long-winged seabird and golfing term? Albatross (in golf an albatross is a hole score of three strokes under par)
What is the first name of Paul McCartney's fashion designer daughter? Stella
What is the first letter of the Greek alphabet? Alpha
What is the flavour of the liqueur Amaretto? Almond
Which poet wrote The Divine Comedy? Dante
quizballs 14 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Who directed the 1995 film Casino? Martin Scorsese
The Thinker is the work of which sculptor? Rodin
On which river are the Victoria Falls? Zambesi
In the UK military what does SAS stand for? Special Air Service
From which type of wood are cricket bats traditionally made? Willow
On which part of the body would you wear a sabot? Foot (it's a wooden shoe)
What date of the year is St Swithin's Day? 15 July
What is an archer's arrow case called? Quiver
What is the largest planet in our solar system? Jupiter
What type of creature is an avadavat? Bird
What is the name of the prison in the British TV comedy series Porridge? Slade
Who became the First Minister of Northern Ireland in 1998? David Trimble
What is the largest city in Australia? Sydney
The Cenotaph is situated in which London street? Whitehall
Which team won the 2006 Superbowl? Pittsburgh Steelers
What is the title of the lowest order of the British nobility? Baron/Baroness
What is the plant hamamelis commonly known as? Witch hazel
What is the name of the substance used for clarifying beer or wine? Fining
If a dish is 'en papillote' it is cooked or served in what? Paper
Who shot and killed John Lennon in New York, 1980? Mark Chapman
What was the title of the first talking film? The Jazz Singer (1927)
Which British disc jockey's nickname was 'Fluff'? Alan Freeman
The Blue Boy is a work by which artist? Thomas Gainsborough
In which year was the MOT test introduced in UK? 1960
Who wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin? Harriet Beecher Stowe
Who discovered the rabies vaccination? Louis Pasteur (1885)
How many hearts does an octopus have? Three
What is the medical term for the shoulder blade? Scapula
Who plays Gabrielle Solis in Desperate Housewives? Eva Longoria
Whose autobiography is entitled Zero to Hero? Frank Bruno
Who is the Greek god of music? Apollo
Who would be put into a panoptican? Prisoners (it's a circular prison with a hollow core in which the guard sits)
John Glenn became which US state's first four-term senator? Ohio
What is the birth stone for November? Topaz
Who wrote the opera Madama Butterfly? Puccini (1896)
Which town is the administrative centre of Shetland? Lerwick
In the TV comedy Dad's Army what is Captain Mainwaring's first name? George
Pershore, Victoria and Washington are types of which fruit? Plum
Mrs Malaprop is a character in which of Sheridan's plays? The Rivals
What did Tim Berners Lee invent? The Internet (or the World Wide Web)
Which US city hosted the 1985 Live Aid concert? Philadelphia
What is the fatty substance found naturally on sheep's wool called? Lanolin
Haptic relates to which of the five senses? Touch
Mal de Mer is the French term for which ailment? Sea-sickness
Who played the original Daisy Duke in TV's Dukes Of Hazard? Catherine Bach
What is the second largest island in the world? New Guinea
How many times in succession did Bjorn Borg win the Men's Tennis Singles at Wimbledon? Five
What was the title of the 1999 album released by Madness? Wonderful
What religious movement was founded by Mary Baker Eddy? Christian Science
What type of animal is a Saki? Monkey

quizballs 15 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
What are parentheses otherwise known as? Brackets (in the printed or written word)
What type of animal is a caribou? Reindeer
Who wrote the novel Gulliver's Travels? Jonathan Swift
What Age followed the Bronze Age? Iron Age
What is the third sign of the Zodiac? Gemini
Who composed The Planets suite? Gustav Holst (1874-1934) composed in 1918
How many bones are in the human skull? Twenty-eight
Who was the first boxer to beat Muhammed Ali as a professional? Joe Frazier
What is the collective name for a group of peacocks? A muster
In Greek mythology who flew too close to the sun and fell to his death when his wax wings melted? Icarus
What type of structure is a campanile? A bell tower
How many strings are on a viola? Four
What does ASLEF stand for? Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen (the railway trade union)
What is the second highest mountain in the world? K2
Which rock band played the first ever concert at London's Roundhouse (in 1966)? Pink Floyd
What does an onomast study? Names
In which country is the site of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon? Iraq (60 miles south of Baghdad)
Who was the first person in space? Yuri Gagarin (in Vostok 1, on 12th April 1961)
Vulpine relates to which animals? Foxes
Which song did Sting sing first at Live Aid in 1985? Roxanne
What were the code-names of the five D-Day Landing beaches? Gold, Juno, Sword, Omaha, Utah.
A nebuchadnezzar of wine holds the equivalent of how many bottles? Twenty
What colour is the mineral malachite? Green
Who led the first circumnavigation of the world? Ferdinand Magellan (1519-21 - Ferdinand Magellan led the expedition which started out in 1519 and resulted in the first circumnavigation of the Earth, but he did not complete the voyage himself as he was killed in the Phillipines in April 1521. The expedition was subsequently led by his second-in-command, Juan Elcano, who was one of only 18 to complete the voyage, reaching home in September 1522, almost 3 years to the day after their departure.)
Jeera is the Indian name for which spice? Cumin
What is the name of the parliament of the Isle of Man? Tynwald
What is the top or bottom supporting post of a stair-rail called? Newel
Which actor is the voice of Stan's gay dog Sparky in the TV cartoon South Park? George Clooney
The density of which substance is measured by a lactometer? Milk
What is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet? Eta
Whose autobiography is titled The Good The Bad and the Bubbly? George Best
Epilation is the removal of what? Hair
In which country is the region of Dalmatia? Croatia
Which cosmetics and perfume company was originally named The California Perfume Co? Avon
What is the inscription on the doorstep of the Saatchi and Saatchi offices in London? Nothing is impossible
How many member countries of the British Commonwealth are there (as at 2006)? Fifty-three
Wedgewood Potteries' Queensware was named in honour of which queen? Queen Charlotte, wife of George III
What is the world's fastest growing plant? Bamboo
How many eyes does a spider have? Eight
What is belladonna commonly known as? Deadly nightshade (the plant)
In anatomy what is the outer layer of the skin called? Epidermis
Which 1984 horror film is subtitled 'The Final Chapter'? Friday the 13th
What are fino, oloroso and amontillado types of? Sherry
Which Egyptian president was shot and killed in 1981? Anwar Sadat
The Birth of Venus is a work by which artist? Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510)
Marsh Gas is another name for what gas? Methane
In which year was the first telegram sent in the UK? 1870
Which actor was born Bernard Schwartz in 1925? Tony Curtis
What is the name of the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London? The Mansion House
What was Jim Reeves' only UK No1 hit? Distant Drums (1966)
quizballs 16 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
What is the capital of Peru? Lima
Who became US president after John F Kennedy was assassinated? Lyndon B Johnson
Who wrote the book The Legend of Sleepy Hollow? Washington Irving
What does an acrophobic fear? Heights
Which band released an album entitled Wish You Were Here? Pink Floyd
Who is the Roman god of fire? Vulcan
What is a carrick bend a type of? Knot
What is an equilibrist? Tightrope walker
Whose husband was Cosmopolitan magazine's first nude centrefold? Germaine Greer
In which English county is the ancient monument Stonehenge? Wiltshire
Which Sunday newspaper was founded by Lord Beaverbrook in 1918? The News Of The World
What is the collective name for a group of beavers? Colony
Who discovered penicillin? Alexander Fleming (1928)
What type of creature is a hairstreak? Butterfly
Which film starring Robert Redford is set in Wakefield Prison Farm? Brubaker
Aileen Wuornos was notorious for being the world's first what? Female serial killer
What type of fruit is a McIntosh? Apple (named after Canadian farmer John McIntosh)
Which Home Secretary, later becoming Prime Minister, was criticised for closely observing the Siege of Sidney Street in 1911? Winston Churchill (later Sir Winston Churchill)
Kulfi is a type of which Indian food? Ice-cream
Eugene the Jeep featured in which comic strip? Popeye
Who sang the theme tune to the Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies? Sheryl Crow
What is Oenology the study of? Wine
What acid is associated with muscles in the body experiencing oxygen debt? Lactic acid
In 1960 which country had the first ever woman prime minister? (Ceylon) Sri Lanka (Sirimavo Bandaranaike)
Nephritis is the inflamation of which part of the body? Kidneys
Who played the father in the 1950 film Father Of The Bride? Spencer Tracy
What are classified using the Munsell system? Colours
If an insect is apterous what has it not got? Wings
In which country would you find the Southern Alps? New Zealand
What does OPEC stand for? Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries
Padauk is a type of what natural substance? Wood
How many carats is pure gold? 24
What was the first name of Sir Winston Churchill's wife? Clementine
What was the Rolling Stones' first UK number 1 hit? It's All Over Now
What is the bullet-proof screen on a military vehicle called? Mantlet
The Battle of Naseby was fought during which war? English Civil War (June 1645)
How many hulls does a catamaran have? Two
Jazz singer Eleanor Gough McKay was better known by which name? Billie Holiday
In which country is Africa's highest ski resort? Morocco
If a dish is parmentier what is it cooked or served with? Potatoes
In boxing what weight is between a flyweight and a featherweight? Bantamweight
Boudicca (Boadicea) was queen of which tribe of people? The Iceni (of Eastern England, who for a brief period around AD60 joined with other tribes to re-take London and St Albans from the occupying Roman forces)
What type of plant is a saguaro? Cactus
Which designer was made famous by his headwear worn by his mother Gertrude? David Shilling
In which city were the 1972 Summer Olympics held? Munich
Which politician came second in the 2001 Tory Party leadership contest? Kenneth Clarke
What colour is stone lapis lazuli? Blue
What is a camel with one hump called? Dromedary
What spirit is used to make a Harvey Wallbanger? Vodka
Who took over from Richard Whiteley as the presenter of TV's Countdown? Des Lynham
quizballs 17 - world cup and football quiz - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Note that 'football' in this quiz means 'soccer'. Some of these questions contain more than one element in the answers, so quizmasters and facilitators should decide before-hand how to award points or half-points for part-correct answers.

This quiz is mainly based on English football facts and England World Cup facts; my apologies to folk from other nations. I'm happy to publish quizzes featuring other sports and other nations if anyone would like to share.

Not all of these questions are about the World Cup.

Where the word captain is used it refers to captaincy of the senior team (not under-21's or youth teams etc).

Where was the 1986 World Cup held? Mexico
Who was the last player to captain England before David Beckham? Martin Keown
What football club did Gordon Banks play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Leicester City
Fill in the missing name in this sequence of England managers: Ramsey, Mercer, Revie, ? , Robson. Ron Greenwood (1977-82)
Which of these players never scored a hat-trick for England: Bobby Charlton, Gary Lineker, Paul Scholes, Luther Blissett, Teddy Sheringham, Alan Shearer? Teddy Sheringham
England coaches Sammy Lee and Ray Clemence played together at which club? Liverpool
How many places were allocated to African teams for the 2006 World Cup? Five
What did all these players win between 1989 and 1997: Paul Merson, Matt Le Tissier, Lee Sharpe, Ryan Giggs, Andy Cole, Robbie Fowler and David Beckham? The (PFA) Young Player of the Year award, 1989-97
Aside from goalkeepers, which two England captains since 1966 never scored their country? Mick Mills and Trevor Cherry.
Which of these players never captained England's senior team: Peter Beardsley, Paul Ince, David Seaman, Bobby Charlton, Gordon Banks? Gordon Banks
Who was England's football manager in the 1970 World Cup? Sir Alf Ramsey
How many players in England's 2006 World Cup squad were also in the 1998 squad? And to ask a tougher question, name them..) Five - Sol Campbell, Gary Neville, David Beckham, Michael Owen and Rio Ferdinand
Which manager first appointed David Beckham as England captain? Peter Taylor (for Taylor's one match in charge as caretaker manager, versus Italy in November 2000)
Who was the first player to play for England who had not been born when England won the world cup in 1966? Tony Adams
What was the score after extra time before England lost on penalties to Portugal in the quarter final of the European Championship in June 2004? 2-2 (Portugal won the penalty shoot-out 6-5)
In what World Cup did the England goals by Mariner, Robson and Francis feature in games against France, Czechoslovakia and Kuwait? Spain 1982
Who was England's first national team manager? Walter Winterbottom (1946-63)
Whose injury made way for Geoff Hurst in England's 1966 World Cup team? Jimmy Greaves
Who was the first defender to captain England after Bobby Moore? Emlyn Hughes
What football club did Bobby Charlton play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Manchester United
Who was the first £100,000 football transfer? Dennis Law (from Torino Manchester United in 1962)
What decade was the white ball legalised in football? 1950's (1950)
What did these players all win between 1963 and 1968: Lev Yashin, Dennis Law, Eusebio, Bobby Charlton, Florian Albert and George Best? European Footballer of the Year award (from 1963-1968)
Who was the first football transfer over £100,000 between English clubs? Alan Ball (from Blackpool to Everton in 1966)
Where and when were the three World Cup tournaments that England failed to qualify for after 1966? West Germany 1974, Argentina 1978 and USA 1994
Where was the 1962 World Cup held? Chile
Who were England's full backs in the 1966 World Cup Final? Ray Wilson and George Cohen
Who was the first £1m football transfer between English clubs? Trevor Francis (from Birmingham to Nottingham Forest in 1979)
What football club did Bobby Moore play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? West Ham United
Bobby Moore and Billy Wright share the record for the number of games as England captain with 90 each. At the start of the 2006 World Cup which player captained England the most times aside from Moore and Wright? Bryan Robson (65 times from 1982-91)
Who was the first £2m football transfer between English clubs? Paul Gasgoigne (from Newcastle to Tottenham in 1988)
What height and width is a football goal? Eight feet high (2.4m) and eight yards wide (7.3m)
What football club did Jackie Charlton play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Leeds United
Who, according to FIFA regulations, was responsible for supplying the footballs for the 2006 World Cup qualifying stage games? The host football association, ie., Germany (incidentally FIFA supplies the balls for the final competition)
In what decade was England's first national team manager appointed? 1940's (1946 - Walter Winterbottom)
What football club did Roger Hunt play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Liverpool
In what World Cups did Bryan Robson appear? 1982, 1986 and 1990
What is the minimum rest period between two games for any team at the 2006 World Cup according to FIFA competition rules? 48 hours
Which 1970 World Cup England striker retired to run a successful West Midlands window cleaning business? Jeff Astle
Fill in the missing name in this sequence of England managers: Taylor, Venables, Hoddle, ? , Keegan. Howard Wilkinson (caretaker manager in 1999 and 2000)
Who were England's three goalkeepers in the 1982 World Cup? Ray Clemence, Peter Shilton, and ....... Joe Corrigan (of Manchester City)
What did all of these players win between 1995 and 1999: Jurgen Klinsmann, Eric Cantona, Gian Franco Zola, Dennis Bergkamp and David Ginola? Winners of the English Football Player of the Year award (Football Writer's Player of the Year, 1995-99)
What football club did Nobby Stiles play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Manchester United
Which past England captain is the only player in English football to have captained an English Football League-winning club in three different decades? Tony Adams
How many places were allocated to European teams for the 2006 World Cup, including the hosts Germany? Fourteen
Who appeared most times for England and how many times? Peter Shilton, 125 caps
Between the 1966 and 2006 World Cups only four England captains have played for three different clubs while captaining their country, who are they? Paul Ince (Manchester United/Inter Milan/Liverpool), David Platt (Juventus/Sampdoria/Arsenal), Kevin Keegan (Liverpool/Hamburg/Southampton) and, wait for it ...... Peter Shilton (Nottingham Forest/Southampton/Derby)
What football club did Geoff Hurst play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? West Ham United
What decade was the crossbar introduced in Football? 1870's (1875)
Who broke his neck in the 1956 FA Cup Final? Bert Trautmann of Manchester City
Who was the first football transfer over £10m between English clubs? Alan Shearer (Blackburn to Newcastle in 1996)
Who replaced David Seaman as England's third choice goalkeeper in the 1990 World Cup squad after Seaman injured his thumb in training? Dave Beasant (of Wimbledon)
Where was the 1978 World Cup held? Argentina
FIFA's 2006 World Cup rules dictate a squad size of how many players? Twenty-three
In what World Cup did Mark Hateley and Gary Lineker wear the 9 and 10 shirts? 1986
What did each of these players win between 1996 and 2000: Matthias Sammer, Ronaldo, Zinedine Zedane, Rivaldo, and Luis Figo? European Footballer of the Year award (from 1996-2000)
Where was the 1998 World Cup held? France
Who was the first black footballer to win a full England cap? Viv Anderson, 1978
What football club did Martin Peters play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? West Ham United
Which manager took England to the semi-final of the world cup in 1990? Bobby Robson
Whose last game as manager of England was a 0-0 draw away to Portugal in 1974? Sir Alf Ramsey
It is said that an international football match in 1969 started a war between which two nations in the central Americas? El Salvador v Honduras
What football club did George Cohen play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Fulham
How many medals will be awarded to each of the first, second and third placed teams at the 2006 World Cup? Forty-five - that's 45 to each team. Amazing - who gets them all? If you know please tell me..
Who were England's four successful penalty takers in the winning 4-2 penalty shoot-out against Spain in the Euro-96 Championship quarter-final at Wembley? Shearer, Platt, Pearce, and Gascoigne (also the first four successful penalty takers in the next round versus Germany - Sheringham was the next to score against Germany; Southgate's penalty was saved and Germany won 6-5 to go through to the Euro-96 final)
What football club did Ray Wilson play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Everton
Which team did England beat in the 1990 World Cup when Gary Lineker's second successful penalty of the game gave England victory in extra time? Cameroon
What football club did Alan Ball play for when he won his 1966 World Cup medal? Blackpool (he transferred to Everton in August 1966 for a then record fee of £110,000.)
In the event of a team failing to fulfil or complete a match at the 2006 World Cup Final tournament, what is the score awarded to the other team by the organising committee? 3-0 (or greater if the score was greater at the time of the withdrawal)
Who scored England's dying seconds winner against Belgium in the 1990 World Cup? David Platt
How many managers had been in charge of the England football team before Alf Ramsey? Just one (Walter Winterbottom).
Who was England's goalkeeper in the losing game against Germany in the 1970 World Cup? Peter Bonetti
Who was Everton's representative in England's 1966 World Cup winning team? Ray Wilson
Where are the headquarters of FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association)? Zurich, Switzerland.
How many players in England's 2006 World Cup squad had previously captained their country? (Or to ask a tougher question, name them..) Four - David Beckham, Michael Owen, Steven Gerrard, and, wait for it ....... Sol Campbell
quizballs 18 - entertainment - freequiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Which former Miss World played TV's Wonderwoman in the 1970's? Lynda Carter
Who wrote the novel Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas'? Hunter Thompson
Which musician's original name was Declan McManus? Elvis Costello
Whose autobiography was entitled Unreliable Memoirs? Clive James
Who was Bertie Wooster's servant? Reginald Jeeves
The song The Rhythm Of Life comes from which musical? Sweet Charity
Which singer released a 1984 album called Alf? Alison Moyet
What was the title of the Beatles' first UK No 1 single? From Me To You (1963)
Who played the Birdman of Alcatraz in the 1962 film? Burt Lancaster
Which comedy due were known as Derek and Clive? Peter Cook and Dudley Moore
Who was the first star to appear as Cosmopolitan magazine's centrefold? Burt Reynolds
What was the name of the car in The Duke's Of Hazzard? General Lee
Who was the child star of Steven Spielberg's Empire Of The Sun? Christian Bale
What was the cow called in the children's TV animation The Magic Roundabout? Ermintrude
Which football team did Gordon Ramsey play for before becoming a chef? Glasgow Rangers
Who presented TV's Room 101 before Paul Merton? Nick Hancock
How many Oscars did the 1997 film Titanic win? Eleven
Who killed Maxine Peacock in Coronation Street? Richard Hillman
Which father and daughter starred in the film Paper Moon? Ryan and Tatum O'Neal
What was the name of the character played by David Cassidy in TV's The Partridge Family? Keith Partridge
What is the title of Tennessee Williams' only comedy? Period Of Adjustment
Who was the Beatles' original drummer? Pete Best
What is the name of the road where TV's Desperate Housewives live? Wisteria Lane
What is the sisters' surname in the novel Little Women by Louisa May Alcott? March (Amy, Beth, Jo, and Meg)
Who played Angela Phinlay in the 1950 film Asphalt Jungle? Marilyn Monroe
In which 1985 was Madonna's first starring role? Desperately Seeking Susan
Who directed the 1997 film Ice Storm? Ang Lee
What is the name of the school in the Harry Potter books? Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry
Who is Calvin Broadus better known as? Snoop Dogg
The 1970's bands Wizzard and ELO resulted from the split what 1960's group? The Move
quizballs 19 - free quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

What is the Roman numeral for 50? L
Jack Bauer is the main character in which TV series? 24
The statue on the top of London's Old Bailey building is holding what in her right hand? A sword
What is the sign of the Zodiac represented by a crab? Cancer
Tactile relates to which of the senses? Touch
What does the F stand for in John F Kennedy? Fitzgerald
Which is the largest city in the USA? New York
What is a camel with two humps called? Bactrian
What is the last letter of the Greek alphabet? Omega
Who wrote the novel Cider With Rosie? Laurie Lee
An alligator pear is another name for which fruit? Avocado
Marie McLaughlin Lawrie is the real name of which singer? Lulu
What was the name of the character played by Eddie Murphy in the 1984 film Beverley Hills Cop? Axel Foley
What is the common name for nitrous oxide? Laughing Gas
Which vegetables are hash browns made from? Potatoes
In the English National Lottery how many red thunderballs are there (as at 2006)? 14
Which British Royal Wedding was the first to be broadcast in colour? Princess Anne and Mark Phillips
Who scored a hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup Final? Geoff Hurst (of England)
Which country is Red Stripe lager originally from? Jamaica
In which year was the Falklands War? 1982
What is the name of the space station first launched by the Soviet Union in 1986? MIR
When are pancakes traditionally eaten? Shrove Tuesday
What does EPNS stand for? Electro-plated Nickel Silver (seen on cutlery, etc)
Who is the Roman God of Love? Cupid
Who was Henry VIII's first wife? Catherine of Aragon
What type of domestic cat has no tail? Manx
What is the medical term for the breastbone? Sternum
What is a supposed straight line connecting three or more ancient sites called? Ley line
Which perfume house launched its Dune perfume in 1991? Christian Dior
Who wrote Wind In The Willows? Kenneth Grahame
Where was the Magna Carta signed? Runnymede (1215)
Who wrote the opera Porgy and Bess? George Gershwin
What is the world's longest river? The Nile
The Haywain is the work of which artist? John Constable
What is the collective term for a group of geese? Gaggle (or skein if in flight)
Who was the first prime minister to live in No10 Downing Street? Robert Walpole (1735)
Which country has the international car registration 'D'? Germany
Early Rivers, Morello and Napoleon are types of which fruit? Cherries
What does a philatelist collect? Stamps
A nicker was slang for which British pre-decimal currency unit? A pound
Which English county is known as the Garden of England? Kent
What type of animal is an Ibex? Goat
The spice saffron is made from the dried stigmas of which flower? Crocus
Which animal lives in a holt? Otter
Which was the last of the seven 'Road' films starring Bob Hope and Bing Crosby? The Road to Hong Kong
In which month is St George's Day? April (23rd)
Which anniversary is celebrated upon 25 years of marriage? Silver
In which sport is an epée used? Fencing (it's the sword)
In which war was the Battle of the Somme? First World War (The Battle of the Somme commenced on 1 July 1916 and lasted until November that year. Combined Allied and German fatalities exceeded 300,000 men, of which over 25,000 were on the first day.)
In which European city would you find Checkpoint Charlie? Berlin
Which car manufacturer makes the Jazz model? Honda
quizballs 20 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Who played Elwood in the original film The Blues Brothers? Dan Ackroyd
Kim Peek, the famous 'savant', inspired Dustin Hoffman's character in which film? Rainman
Who was the drummer in the band Free? Simon Kirk
In which year skating stars Torville and Dean win Olympic gold medals? 1984
Which cartoon character has nephews Morty and Ferdy? Mickey Mouse
In which city is the Doors vocalist Jim Morrison buried? Paris
Which Rocky film had The Eye Of The Tiger as its theme song? Rocky III
Which of the Sex Pistols was christened John Beverly? Sid Vicious
Which famous rock band were formerly known as The High Numbers? The Who
What is the name of the captain of the Pequod in the novel Moby Dick? Captain Ahab
Who directed the 1988 film Beetlejuice? Tim Burton
Who wrote the novel A Clockwork Orange? Anthony Burgess
In TV's Coronation street how many sons did Mike Baldwin have? Three (Danny, Mark and Adam, bless 'em)
What character does Uma Thurman play in the 1997 film Batman and Robin? Poison Ivy
What was the title of Elvis Costello's first album? My Aim Is True (1977)
Who won the award for the best comedy newcomer at the British comedy awards in 2003? David Walliams
Who did George Clooney play in TV's ER? Doctor Doug Ross
In which novel was the character Holden Caulfield? The Catcher In The Rye
In which Australian TV Soap did Dannii Minogue star? Home and Away
What 1960's three-piece group featured bass-player Noel Redding, drummer Mitch Mitchell, and one other whose name would somewhat give away the answer? The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Who wrote the opera Billy Budd? Benjamin Britten (1951)
With which UK airport is actress Lorraine Chase associated? Luton (she mentioned it in a popular 1970's Campari advert)
What was Dorothy's surname in the Wizard Of Oz? Gale
Which pop star took Dick James to court over a royalty dispute in 1985 and won? Elton John
Who sang the theme for the Bond film For Your Eyes Only? Sheena Easton
How many light years was ET away from home? Three million (not far then...)
Who is the presenter on Channel 4's show Time Team? Tony Robinson
What was the name of the Long Island resort in the 1975 film Jaws? Amity
Who was the first singer to have three consecutive releases reach number one in the UK? Elvis Presley
What was the name of the fictitious hair dresser who sued to phone in to Steve Wright's radio show? Gervais
quizballs 21 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Who took over from Magnus Magnassun as host of (UK) TV's Mastermind? John Humphreys
Who was William Claude Dukenfield better known as? WC Fields
Which 1969 film had the Oscar-winning song Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head? Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
What was Westlife's first UK No1 hit? Swear It Again
What was the name of the character played by Michael Douglas in the 1987 film Wall Street? Gordon Gekko
Whose autobiography is entitled Is It Me? Terry Wogan
Which singer's real name is Paul Hewson? Bono (of U2)
Which actor is the voice of Homer Simpson's brother Herb? Danny Devito
Who directed the 1966 film Torn Curtain? Alfred Hitchcock
What car did Thelma and Louise drive? '66 Thunderbird
Which member of Led Zeppelin dies in 1980 age 32? Drummer John Bonham
Which Beatles film features a mad scientist named Doctor Foot? Help?
How many Oscars did Joan Crawford win? One
What are the first names of the three Railway Children, the film from the novel by Edith Nesbit? Peter, Phyllis and Roberta
Who wrote the poem Ode To A Nightingale? John Keats
What is the title of the 1985 film about Ruth Ellis, the last woman to be hanged in Britain? Dance With A Stranger
How many roles does Eddie Murphy play in the 1996 film The Nutty Professor? Seven
Who played the character Vivian in (UK) TV's The Young Ones? Adrian Edmondson
Which European city is the setting for the 1973 film Don't Look Now? Venice
Who wrote the Opera La Boheme? Puccini (1896)
The film Forrest Gump won how many Oscars? Six
The White Fokker was the first story to feature which hero? Biggles
Who was Humphrey the 10 Downing Street cat who died in 2006 named after? Sir Humphrey Appleby, in TV's Yes Minister
Which was the first Road film featuring Bing Crosby and Bob Hope? The Road to Singapore (1940)
Which Rodgers and Hammerstein musical features Prince Chula Longkorn? The King And I
Which famous music festival was first staged in 1970? Glastonbury
Who plays New York gangster Noodles in the 1984 film Once Upon A Time In America? Robert De Niro
Which celebrity was known as The Joan Collins Fan Club? Julian Clary
Who played James Bond in the film Goldfinger? Sean Connery
Who were the first artists to appear in (UK) TV's Top Of The Pops? The Rolling Stones (playing I Wanna Be Your Man in 1964)
quizballs 22 - free quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

In which country are the Cariboo Mountains? Canada (British Columbia)
In which month is Lady Day (UK)? March
Who was the first Lancaster King of England? Henry IV (ruled from 1399-1413)
A mahout is a person who works with and rides what? Elephants
What is the capital of Romania? Bucharest
What is the name of our nearest galaxy? Andromeda (2.5m light-years way)
In which city was the artist Francis Bacon born? Dublin
Who saved the magazine Private Eye from financial ruin in 1962? Peter Cook (the comedian partner of Dudley Moore)
Cartomancy is fortune-telling using what? Playing cards
Aioli is mayonnaise seasoned with what? Garlic
Lego building blocks originated from which country? Denmark ('Leg Godt' means 'play well' in Danish)
What type of creature is a an Eland? Antelope
What does UNICEF stand for? United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund
What is the longest river in France? The Loire
Where in the human body is the thyroid gland? Neck
On which country's stock exchange is the All Ordinaries index? Australia
Which health minister was responsible for the introduction of the UK National Health Service? Aneurin Bevan
What is dromophobia a fear of? Crossing the road
What were artist LS Lowry's first names? Laurence Stephen
Who was the first person to cross Antarctica? Vivian Fuchs (1957-58, English explorer)
What colour are the flowers of the harebell? Blue
In anatomy what are the nates? Buttocks
What is the Roman numeral for 500? D
In which country is the church with the tallest spire in the world? Germany (Ulm Munster)
How many astronauts have walked on the moon? Twelve
Who were Balthazar, Melchior, and Gaspar? The Three Wise Men (or the Three Kings)
Wild majoram is another name for which herb? Oregano
Latten is an alloy of which two metals? Copper and Zinc
Malibu Beach is in which US state? California
Which insect lives in a formicary? Ant
What is Sir Alan Sugar's charter airline called? Amsair
Lupine relates to which animals? Wolves
In which Yorkshire castle did Richard II die in 1400? Pontefract
What is ascorbic acid commonly known as? Vitamin C
Bunny was the sidekick of which fictional thief? Raffles
In which year was the Sydney Opera House opened? 1973
What type of nuts are used to make marzipan? Almond
What is a negatively charged electrode called? Cathode
Which war started following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand? World War One
What did the rat eat 'that lay in the house that Jack built', in the nursery rhyme The House that Jack Built? Malt (The opening verse goes: This is the cat, that killed the rat, that ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.)
A paradiddle is a playing technique for which instrument? The drums (or a drum)
Which two teams played in the first FA Cup Final at the original Wembley Stadium? Bolton Wanderers and West Ham (1923, Bolton won 2-0 - the crowd was estimated at 200,000 because about 70,000 burst through the gates without tickets. The original Wembley Stadium cost £750,000 and 300 days to build)
How many Grand Prix did Graham Hill win? Fourteen
An oenophile is a connoisseur of what? Wine
Which was the first US state to enter the Union? Delaware (1787)
A terawatt is how many megawatts? A million
Which British airport was opened to passengers in 1946? Heathrow
What is decompression sickness commonly known as? The Bends (as suffered by divers due to pressure-change when surfacing too quickly)
What is the offspring of a donkey and a horse called? A mule (or a hinny)
In which UK newspaper did the first crossword appear? The Sunday Express (November 1924)
quizballs 23 - free quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Which American writer created Tarzan? Edgar Rice Burroughs
What is the art of decorative writing called? Calligraphy
In which part of the human body would you find the talus? Ankle
In which European city is the International Court of Justice based? The Hague
What type of weather is Brontophobia a fear of? Thunder
Sandra Goodrich was better known what 1960's singer? Sandy Shaw
Which American artist died in a car crash in 1956? Jackson Pollock
What type of flower is a ladies slipper? Orchid
In what type of establishment was Lloyds of London formed in 1688? A Coffee House (called Edward Lloyd's)
A natatorium is what type of amenity? Swimming pool (partcularly indoors)
Who was Henry VIII's fourth wife? Anne of Cleves (Jan-Jul 1540)
What (as at August 2006) is the world's longest running children's TV programme? Blue Peter
What was Elvis Presley's first record label? Sun Records
Who designed London's Marble Arch? John Nash
Which perfume was named for Coco Chanel's birthday? Chanel No19
Whose autobiography is entitled Testing Times? Graham Gooch
What painful custom was outlawed in China in 1912? Binding the feet of young girls
How many British Open Golf Championships has Nick Faldo won (as at 2006)? Three
What was the first UK colour TV advertisement? Birds Eye peas (1969)
Who was actor Tony Curtis' first wife? Janet Leigh
What is the birthstone for February? Amethyst
Who composed Peter and the Wolf? Sergey Prokofiev (1936)
In which English county is Belvoir (pronounced 'beaver') Castle? Leicestershire (close to the Lincolnshire border and Grantham)
What is the name of Al Pacino's character in the 1983 film Scarface? Tony Montana
Who designed Princess Diana's wedding dress? David and Elizabeth Emanuel
If a floor or surface is marmoreal what is it made of? Marble
What does JPEG stand for? Joint Photographics Expert Group
Who discovered Panama in 1503? Christopher Columbus
Which English city is the setting for TV's Inspector Morse? Oxford
What is the fastest running British bird? Pheasant (up to 21 mph)
Andy Capp is the work of which cartoonist? Reg Smythe
What does a cartographer draw? Maps
Who is the Greek God of the Sea? Poseidon
What type of creature is an alcid? Bird
What is the wife of a Marquess? Marchioness
What is the currency of Egypt? Pound (comprising 100 piastres)
What is the usual anatomical name for a skull without a mandible? Cranium (the mandible is the jawbone)
Whish British Prime Minister followed Winston Churchill's first term as PM? Clement Atlee (1945-51)
TV chefs (UK) Simon King and David Myers are better known as? The Hairy Bikers
With what other large building society did the Nationwide merge in the 1980's? The Anglia Building Society
What type of fruit is a gean? Cherry
What is the brightest star in the night sky? Sirius (or the Dog Star, 8.7 light years from Earth, twice as big as our Sun and 20 times more luminous, so it's just as well it's so far away...)
What is the world's second largest sea? Caribbean
What is the name of silver in heraldry? Argent
Nephology is the study of what high subject? Clouds
In which year did Esther Rantzen launch Childline? 1986
How many boroughs does New York have? Five (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, The Bronx)
Which Mediterranean plant used in medicine and magic was said to shriek when pulled from the ground? Mandrake
Ursine relates to which large furred animals? Bears
Cardiff in Wales is on which river? Taff
quizballs 24 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Which Italian city is the setting for the film starring Cher and Judi Dench called Tea With Mussolini? Florence
Who had the best selling debut album by a female artist of the 20th century? Whitney Houston
Who plays Edie Britt in TV's desperate Housewives? Nicolette Sheridan
Who played a chain-smoking womanising angel in the 1996 film Michael? John Travolta
Which underworld character's autobiography was entitled Odd Man Out? Ronnie Biggs
Which actor's original name was Richard Jenkins? Richard Burton
Who was Jessica Rabbit's speaking voice in the 1988 film Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Kathleen Turner
What US sitcom's famous fictional venue is at 112½ Beacon Street? Cheers (the bar)
Who was cartoonist William Hannah's professional partner? Joseph Barbera
In the 1938 film Bringing Up Baby, what is 'baby'? A Leopard
Which Quentin Tarantino film was originally called Black Mask? Pulp Fiction
In which Marx Bothers film does the character Rufus T Firefly appear? Duck Soup
What is composer George Gershwin's famous brother's name? Ira Gershwin
Who directed the 1960 film The Alamo? John Wayne
What is the name of the school in Muriel Spark's novel The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie? The Marcia Blaine School for Girls
Which two musicians founded Band Aid in 1984? Bob Geldof and Midge Ure
Who did Billie Piper play in Dr Who? Rose Tyler
What was the title of the first colour Carry On film? Carry On Cruising (1962)
How many wives did actor Cary Grant have? Five (not all at the same time of course..)
Vincent Price's last screen appearance was in which film? Edward Scissorhands (1990)
What was the name of the department store in the UK 1970's TV show Are You Being Served? Grace Brothers
The 1976 film All The President's Men is about which US political scandal? Watergate
Which sporting event was BBC2's first colour transmission in 1967? Wimbledon Tennis Championships
Which singer made his first TV appearance in 1956 on the Dorsey Brother's Show? Elvis Presley
Steve Brookstein was the first winner of which UK TV talent show? The X-Factor
Who played Willy Wonka in the 1971 film Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory? Gene Wilder
What is the assistant to the chief electrician of a film crew called? Best Boy
What is the name of the police chief The Simpsons? Clancy Wiggun
Michael Myers is a character in which series of films? Halloween
In the 1970's who became the first Jamaican singer ever to top the US pop charts? Carl Douglas (with Kung Fu Fighting)
quizballs 25 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

What was the title of Marilyn Monroe's unfinished 1962 film? Something's Got To Give
Which awards were first presented in 1929? The Oscars
Who had the fastest selling debut single in UK pop chart history? Will Young (March 2002, double A-side 'Evergreen' and 'Anything is possible', selling more over 400,000 on its day of release and more than a million in a week.)
On which island was the TV series Bergerac set? Jersey
Which was the first British sitcom to win the best comedy prize at the Golden Globe awards? The Office (2004)
Which showman coined the phrase 'The greatest show on earth'? Phineas T Barnum
In which country was actress Ursula Andress born? Switzerland
In which British river did novelist Virginia Woolf drown? River Ouse (1941)
Which guitarist joined the Rolling Stones having played with Rod Stewart and the Faces? Ronnie Wood
Who is the presenter of UK TV's Deal or No Deal (as at 2006)? Noel Edmonds
Who did Robert Vaughan and David McCallum play in TV's The Man From UNCLE? Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakian
In which year were LP records first introduced? 1948
Which musician was known as Satchmo? Louis Armstrong
Who wrote the novel on which the Bogart film The African Queen was based? C S Forester
Which 1980's pop group were named after a 1960 film starring Robert Wagner, Natalie Wood and Pearl Bailey? The Fine Young Cannibals
Whose orchestral works include Enigma Variations? Edward Elgar
Who plays the plastic surgeon in the 1992 film Death Becomes Her? Bruce Willis
Craig Stirling is a character in which cult TV show? The Champions
Which film was based on an unproduced play called Everybody Comes To Ricks? Casablanca (1942)
What is the name of the taxi driver played by Robert De Niro in the 1976 film Taxi Driver? Travis Bickle
Which singer released an album called Drag? k d lang
Whose biography is entitled Citizen Jane? Jane Fonda
In which Beatles song are the names Vera, Chuck and Dave? When I'm Sixty-Four
Lou Todd and Andy Pipkin are characters in which British TV show? Little Britain
How many 'Mr colours' were there in the 1991 film Reservoir Dogs? Six (White, Orange, Blue, Blonde, Pink, Brown.)
Which US disc jockey is the subject of the 1996 film Private Parts? Howard Stern
Which female American country singer died in a plane crash in 1963? Pasty Cline
In the film The Wizard Of Oz, what does Dorothy have to steal from the Wicked Witch of the West? Her broomstick
How many films did Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor star in together? Ten
What are the two cities in the Charles Dickens novel A Tale Of Two Cities? Paris and London
quizballs 26 - free quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


Which US state has the longest shoreline? Alaska (33,904 miles)
How many children did Winston Churchill (British Prime Minister) have? Five (Diana, Randolph, Sarah, Marigold, Mary)
Who was the first cricketer in history to take 300 test match wickets? Fred Truman
What type of creature is an albacore? Fish
Which UK newspaper was founded in September 1964? The Sun
Which is the hottest planet in our solar system (based on generally accepted average surface temperatures)? Venus (Mercury is closest to the sun and is subject to the highest irradiation from the Sun, but Venus, due to its cloud cover and atmospheric density has a hotter 'mean' temperature than Mercury, and is generally regarded as the hottest planet in our solar system)
What is the capital of the Philippines? Manila
A Macfarlane is what type of clothing item? Coat
Who was the first Hanover King of England? George I (1714-1727)
From which country does the drink Kvass originate? Russia
What IBM (the IT systems company) stand for? International Business Machines
What is the plant saintpaulia commonly known as? African violet
What part of the body does Keratitis affect? The eye (inflammation of the cornea)
Lacustrine is a technical term relating to what? Lakes
What are Latter Day Saints otherwise known as? Mormons
What rank in the Royal Navy is above Able Seaman and below Petty Officer? Leading Seaman
What is a puppet worked by strings called? Marionette
Where is the deepest lake in the world? Siberia (Russia - Lake Baikal, 5,712ft deep)
The natterjack toad has what colour stripe down its back? Yellow
How many wheels did a hansom cab have? Two
Who discovered Victoria Falls in 1855? Dr David Livingstone
The US Labour Day falls in which month? September (the first Monday)
During World War II, forged paintings by which artist were produced by Jan Van Meegeren? Jan Vermeer
Anosmia is the technical term for the loss of which sense? Smell
Jargonelle, Seckel and Winter Nelis are types of which fruit? Pear
In which country was fashion designer Helmut Lang born? Austria
What country has the international car registration EAK? Kenya
How many strings does a balalaika typically have? Three
A carat (gemstone measurement) is the equivalent of how many milligrams? 200
Beriberi is a disease said to be caused by the deficiency of which vitamin? B
The production of what poisonous substance can be caused by eating raw cassava? Cyanide
Lord Raglan was a commander in which war? Crimean War
Who was the Greek goddess of divine punishment? Nemesis
Which Frank Dickens cartoon appears in the London Evening Standard (as at 2006)? Bristow
What is the collective name for a group of finches? Charm
Astraphobia is a fear of what? Lightning
What star sign are people born on 25 August? Virgo
In which year was the Battle of Stamford Bridge? 1066 (September - The Battle of Hastings followed in October)
Which fragrance was first made for Russian Count Orloff in 1768? Imperial Leather
Developed in Germany during World War II what is tabun? Nerve gas
Which country was previously called Mesopotamia? Iraq
The pub name The White Hart is named after which king's heraldic symbol? Richard II
How many presidents' faces are sculpted on Mount Rushmore? Four (Washington, Lincoln, Roosevelt and Jefferson)
How many sides does a mansard roof have? Four (each with two slopes or faces)
Black velvet is a mixture of stout and which other alcoholic drink? Champagne
What is the title name of the Usher to the House of Lords? Black Rod
Which country suffered the greatest civilian losses in World War II? China (approximately 8 million people)
Which element has the highest melting point? Carbon (3,527 degrees centigrade)
Who founded the Boys Brigade in 1883? William Smith
Marble is a form of which type of rock? Limestone
quizballs 27 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Which film-maker has received the most Academy Awards (as at 2006)? Walt Disney (48 in his lifetime, according to his Disney corporation biography)
What is the name of the wood where Winnie the Pooh lives? Hundred Acre Wood
Who wrote the longest-running play The Mousetrap? Agatha Christie (first performed in London's West-End in 1952, and still running there, as at 2006)
Which writer created the fictional British MI6 spy George Smiley? John le Carre
Bob Hoskins played crime boss Harold Shand in which 1979 film? The Long Good Friday
What film featured the ukulele-playing singer 'Sugar' Kane? Some Like It Hot (1959, Marilyn Monroe played 'Sugar' Kane, alongside 'Josephine' and 'Daphne' played by Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis)
What is Jennifer Beale's day job in the 1983 film Flashdance? Welder
On which Shakespeare play is the 1961 film West Side Story based? Romeo and Juliet
Who sang the original theme song to the British 1966 film Alfie, starring Michael Caine? Cilla Black (Cher sang the theme song on the American release of the film and the soundtrack)
Which film was re-named Flight Pacific 121 and then changed back to its original title? Snakes on a Plane
Which iconic rock music frontman sang backing vocals on Carly Simon's 1973 hit You're So Vain? Mick Jagger
Who played Jeff's (James Stewart's) girlfriend Lisa Carol Fremont in the 1954 Hitchcock film Rear Window? Grace Kelly
Who directed the 1969 western The Wild Bunch and the 1971 thriller Straw Dogs? Sam Peckinpah
What is Wendy's surname in Peter Pan? Darling
In which film does the Oscar-winning song Secret Love feature? Calamity Jane (1953, starring Doris Day)
How many UK chart number ones did the Beatles have (as a group)? Seventeen (No, I am not going to list them all..)
What type of shop is 84 Charing Cross Road in the 1986 film of the same title? Bookshop
Which US soul singer was shot dead in 1964 aged 33? Sam Cooke
Which country was the location of the second UK TV series of Auf Wiedersehen Pet? Spain
What was the name of the character played by Richard Beckinsale in UK TV series Porridge? Lennie Godber
What was the name of the strip club in the 1996 film Striptease starring Demi Moore? The Eager Beaver
Which group removed the strings from their guitars in protest when they were forced to mime on Top Of The Pops in 1977? The Stranglers (performing Go Buddy Go)
Which actor played the King in the 1995 film The Madness of King George? Nigel Hawthorne
What does Robert Mitchum's character have tattooed on his knuckles in the 1955 film the Night of the Hunter? The words 'Love' and 'Hate'
What is the real name of the comedian who devised and plays the character Avid Merrion? Leigh Francis (who comes from Leeds, not Transylvania)
What is the name of the character played by Sarah Jessica Parker in the US TV series Sex and the City? Carrie Bradshaw
Which actress plays the date (Nadia Gates) of Bruce Willis (Walter Davis) in the 1987 film Blind Date? Kim Bassinger
What dance hit does David Brent hum during his famous dance routine in UK TV comedy The Office? Disco Inferno (originally by the Trammps, 1976)
In which Thomas Hardy novel does the character Bathsheba Everdene appear? Far from the Madding Crowd
Soeur Sourire was the stage name of the 1960's singer who was better known as whom? The Singing Nun (Soeur Sourire means Sister Smile; real name Jeanine Deckers, she was actually a nun Sister Luc Gabriel from Belgium - her big hit was Dominique, Christmas 1963)

quizballs 28 - free geography quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Apart from water, what runs through the mouth of the River Amazon and Lake Victoria? The Equator
Which country had the world's tallest habitable building as at 2006? Taiwan (called Tapei 101, it is 501 metres high with 101 stories. The Burj Dubai building in the United Arab Emirates surpassed this in 2007.)
Which country was previously called Abyssinia? Ethiopia
In which country is the Blarney Stone? Ireland (or Eire) at Blarney Castle near Cork
What is the world's third largest sea? Mediterranean
The largest policeman's beat (territory) in Europe is in which country? Scotland (The beat is about 900 square miles, in Caithness and Sutherland, North West of Scotland. Based near Kinlochbervie, the police constable normally has about ten cases a year, of which the most notable in recent times was the Labour MP Robin Cook's death while he was hill walking. Thanks to Gordon Smith for these interesting extra details.)
The cities of Cairo in Egypt and Fez in Morroco are generally accepted to have the oldest of what type of institution in the world? University
Where would you find the Queen Alexandra, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Maud mountain ranges? Antarctica
The tenge is the basic monetary unit of which country? Kazakhstan (1 tenge = 100 teims)
Which country at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula was previously known as Aden? Yemen
What language do the locals speak in Bogota? Spanish (Bogota is the capital of Columbia)
What's the most southerly city; Toronto, Seattle, Budapest or Bordeaux? Toronto
LAR is the international vehicle registration of which country? Libya (Libyan Arab Republic)
Where are the North Yolla Bolly mountains? USA, California
In which South American country is the Atacama desert? Chile
What is the capital of Qatar? Doha
Where can you find the first iron bridge ever built? Ironbridge, near Telford in Shropshire, England
Which is the least populated state in the USA? Wyoming
What and when is the biggest national celebration every year in Australia? Australia Day, January 26th (based on the 1788 proclamation of British sovereignty at Sydney Cove over the eastern seaboard of Australia)
Which country has the internet domain .me? Montenegro
What Central American country's name means 'many fish'? Panama
Which capital city has the highest population (as at 2006)? Tokyo (c. 34 million)
What is the largest country in the world? Russia (c.17 million square kilometres)
Who renamed the South Sea as the Pacific Ocean in 1520? Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521, Portuguese explorer. Of the 270 men and five ships who sailed with Magellan on his three year exploration of the Pacific from 1519-22 fewer than 20 returned on a single surviving ship. Magellan was killed in the Philippines. And we think we have it tough in today's times..)
What notable geographical feature is shared by Oxford, Reading, Windsor and London? The River Thames, the longest in England (N.B. the River Severn is slightly longer but given that much of the Severn is in Wales it is generally regarded as the longest in Britain, rather than England - ack T Smith for raising this point)
quizballs 29 - free christmas quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

What date is St Stephen's Day? 26th December
In Charles Dickens' novel A Christmas Carol, who was Scrooge's dead business partner? Jacob Marley
The song White Christmas was first performed in which 1942 film? Holiday Inn
London's Trafalgar Square Christmas tree is traditionally given by which country? Norway
In the song The Twelve Days of Christmas, '...my true love brought to me nine...' what? Ladies dancing
Name the original eight reindeer from the 'Twas the night Before Christmas' poem. Comet, Cupid, Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Donner, Blitzen (or Dunder and Blixem). The poem is alternatively titled A Visit from St Nicholas. 'Twas the night Before Christmas' is the first line. The poem was first published anonymously in 1923 and is commonly attributed to Clement Clarke Moore, although some believe Henry Livingston was the true author. Rudolph was created later in 1939 by copywriter Robert May for the Montgomery Ward department store chain, as the main character in a free Christmas promotional story, which extended the 1923 poem, and was subsequently turned into the popular song Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Incidentally Donner and Blizten mean Thunder and Lightning in German.
Which Christmas carol includes the lyrics '...To save us all from Satan's power, when we were gone astray..'? God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
The character Jack Skellington appears in which 1993 Tim Burton film? The Nightmare before Christmas
What colour are the berries of the mistletoe plant? White
In the inspirational 1946 film, It's a Wonderful Life, what's the name of George Bailey's guardian angel? Clarence (Oddbody)
What are the names of the three wise men said to have brought gifts to the baby Jesus? Balthasar, Melchior, Caspar (or Gaspar) - (Interestingly the Bible does not states state their names, nor even the number of wise men: "...there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem... and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense and myrrh..." from Matthew 2:1 and 2:11. Thanks A Russell.)
What is New Year's Eve called in Scotland? Hogmanay
What Christmas item was invented by London baker and wedding-cake specialist Tom Smith in 1847? Christmas cracker
In what year was Band-Aid's Do They Know It's Christmas the UK Christmas chart-topping record? 1984
Which country did St Nicholas come from? Turkey
Who wrote How the Grinch Stole Christmas? Dr Seuss
From which country does the poinsettia plant originate? Mexico
Who wrote Auld Lange Syne? Robert Burns
How many points does a snowflake have? Six
What is the name of the cake traditionally eaten in Italy at Christmas? Panettone
quizballs 30 - free alphabet quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
This is an alphabet quiz. If you've not spotted it by now, note that the first letters of the answers correspond respectively to the letters of the alphabet. 1 = A, 2 = B, 3 = C, and so on. The depth of this explanation prior to the quiz is at the discretion of the quizmaster (quizmistress... quizperson?...)

The fruit in Tarte Tatin? Apples
Children's TV programme featuring Professor Yaffle (the wooden woodpecker)? Bagpuss
Charles Babbage's notable invention? Computer
Framework for oil well drilling machinery? Derrick
Traditional fur trim on ceremonial and heraldic robes? Ermine (From the white winter coat of the ermine - mustela erminea - AKA stoat and short-tailed weasel. Incidentally the black spotted patterns in heraldic ermines are the black tips of the tails in the joined pelts.)
A maker of arrows? Fletcher
A hot spring which shoots out boiling water and steam? Geyser
Metric unit equal to 10,000 square metres? Hectare
Chemical element with atomic number 53? Iodine
Contest fought between medieval knights with lances on horseback? Joust
Basketball-netball hybrid game for mixed male and female teams? Korfball
Zurich's river? Limmat
The twelfth letter of the Greek alphabet? Mu (= m)
The Tokyo stock exchange index? Nikkei
A fine translucent stiff cotton muslin used chiefly for making dresses? Organdie/organdy/organza
Female part of a flower? Pistil
A type of low fat curd cheese? Quark (interestingly perhaps indirectly related to particle physics quarks, a term adopted by US physicist Murray Gell-Mann in 1964, based he says on the mythical seabird chorus "...Three quarks for Muster Mark..." in James Joyce's book Finnegans Wake, thought to mean three cheers or jeers. Either or both Gell-Mann and Joyce might have been alluding ironically to quark cheese since in German the word extends metaphorically to mean rubbish or nonsense.)
The right page of an open book? Recto (the left page is verso)
The white part of the human eye? Sclera
Bride in the 1998 film Bride of Chucky? Tiffany
Mottled green and yellow citrus fruit hybrid between a grapefruit and tangerine? Ugli
Roman goddess of the hearth? Vesta
US state of which Madison is capital? Wisconsin
Irrational fear or dislike of people from foreign countries? Xenophobia
Circular collapsible tent of felt or skins used by Mongolian nomads? Yurt
Italian dessert of whipped egg yolks, sugar and marsala wine? Zabbaglione
quizballs 31 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


Which UK politician was replaced by a tub of lard when he failed to turn up for a recording of TV quiz show Have I Got News For You? Roy Hattersley
Who played the title role in the 2005 film Nanny McPhee? Emma Thompson
What was the name of Lucille Ball's Cuban band-leader first husband? Desi Arnaz
Who took over the hosting of BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs in 2005? Kirsty Young
In which UK TV series did actor Neil Morrissey make his first television appearance? Boon
What was the name of Bruce Springsteen's 1970s-80s backing group? The E Street Band
Which was the first British TV game show to be adapted for screening in the USA? The Krypton Factor
Which sport is the subject of the 1977 film Slap Shot, starring Paul Newman? Ice hockey
Who wrote the novel Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde? Robert Louis Stevenson
What was the name of Scarlet O'Hara's first husband in Gone with the Wind? Charles Hamilton (second was Frank Kennedy, followed by Rhett Butler)
Which British TV comedy series took its name from the title of a 1960 crime-comedy film starring Jack Hawkins? The League of Gentlemen
Which TV and film character's full name is Alistair Graham? Ali G
Which TV soap actress played Cleopatra in the 1964 film Carry On Cleo? Amanda Barrie (she later played Alma Baldwin in Coronation Street)
What was the name of the ranch in TV's cowboy series Bonanza? The Ponderosa
Whose autobiography is entitled With Nails? Richard E Grant
Which film saw the return after 12 years of Sean Connery as James Bond? Never Say Never Again (1983)
What is the name of Inspector Clouseau's manservant? Cato
Which actor is the voice of Z in the 1998 film Antz? Woody Allen
Which British pop group did Graham Nash leave to join David Crosby in forming Crosby Stills Nash and Young? The Hollies
What did M*A*S*H stand for? Mobile Army Surgical Hospital
What was the first Beatles film? Hard Day's Night (1964)
What is the occupation of The Fugitive? Surgeon (Dr Richard Kimble)
Which band released the album Zooropa? U2
Which actor brothers played the piano players in the 1989 film The Fabulous Baker Boys? Jeff and Beau Bridges
Which football team is the subject of the 1996 film Fever Pitch? Arsenal
Johnny Knoxville became famous in what TV show? Jackass
Which singer and actress was born Julia Elizabeth Wells in 1935? Julie Andrews
Which actor played Bruce Wayne in the 2005 film Batman Begins? Christian Bale
Who did Deidre Langton marry in Coronation Street in 1981? Ken Barlow
Who spoke the only word in the 1976 film Silent Movie? Marcel Marceau (the French mime artist - he said, "Non.")
quizballs 32 - free history quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


What took place on Griffin's Wharf in America in 1773? The Boston Tea Party (on 16 December - American colonists, protesting against British taxes and lack of self-governance, dumped more than 300 crates of British-owned tea in Boston harbour, after boarding three ships disguised as Mohawk natives - the event is regarded as a precursor to the American revolutionary war of independence)
What was the name of the ship on which the Pilgrims travelled to North America in 1620? The Mayflower
What was the name of the English farmer who invented the seed-planting drill in 1701? Jethro Tull
In which year was Nelson Mandela released from prison? 1990
What was the nationality of the first non-Italian Pope since 1523? Polish (Karol Wojtyla, Pope John Paul II, Pope from 1978-2005)
What was the name of the world's first man-made satellite launched by the USSR in 1957? Sputnik I
Which country gained its independence from Denmark in 1944? Iceland
In 1803 who started shipping portions of the sculpted frieze from the Parthenon in Greece to England? Lord Elgin (Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin - the sculpted frieze is more commonly known as the Elgin Marbles.)
In which year did French Queen Marie Antoinette go the guillotine? 1793
Who became US president after Herbert Hoover? Franklin D Roosevelt (1933)
French King Louis XIV (1638-1715) was the longest reigning European monarch - how long did he reign? 72 years (from 1643-1715)
Marjorie Robb, who died in Boston USA in 1992 aged 103, Barbara Dainton, Millvina Dean and Lillian Asplund, achieved notoriety for being among the last living survivors of what? The sinking of the Titanic (1912)
Who in 1963 murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin (according to official accounts) of US President John F Kennedy? Jack Ruby
The Kiel Canal in Germany, officially opened in 1895, connects which two seas? North Sea and Baltic Sea (it is apparently the world's busiest artificial waterway)
Fletcher Christian, who led the mutiny on the Bounty in 1789, subsequently rediscovered and settled on which remote Pacific Island, which had been 'lost' from British maritime records? Pitcairn Island (in the Pacific Ocean, North-East of New Zealand)
What were the waitresses called who worked in the English Lyons Cornerhouse tea rooms, popular in first half of the 1900's? Nippies
In 1624 what was purchased from the local inhabitant Native Americans by the Dutch for a reported sum of $24? Manhattan Island
Which former Prime Minister of India was assassinated in 1991 as he campaigned for re-election? Rajiv Gandhi
Which New York hotel was designed by Henry Hardenbergh in 1897? Waldorf-Astoria
What date is France's Bastille Day? 14th July
Which mountain was climbed for the first time in 1786? Mont Blanc (by Jacques Balmant and Michel-Gabriel Paccard - the mountain is on the border of France and Italy, who each claim the summit is in their country)
In what year did India and Pakistan become independent nations and free from British rule? 1947 (15 August India, and 14 August Pakistan)
Which planet was discovered by William Herschel 1781? Uranus
In 1926, 19 year-old Gertrude Ederle became the first woman to do what? Swim the English Channel
In what year, generally regarded as marking the end of the Cold War, did the Berlin Wall come down? 1989 (9 November)
Which calendar was devised in 1582? Gregorian Calendar (by Aloysius Lilius - it is the calendar that most of the world uses today)
Which London Emporium opened in Picadilly 1707? Fortnum and Mason's
British publisher Ludvik Hoch was better known by which name? Robert Maxwell
Which English King abdicated in 1936? Edward VIII
quizballs 33 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Which football team does Postman Pat support? Pencaster United
Tom Cruise plays a naval lawyer in which 1992 film? A Few Good Men
Who released a 1975 album entitled Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy? Elton John
Who does Ricky Gervais play in the TV series Extras? Andy Millman
In which 1983 film does Steve Martin play Doctor Hfuhruhurr? The Man with Two Brains
Bernard Cribbins made the most appearances on which British children's TV programme? Jackanory
Who wrote the book Lord of the Flies? William Golding
Who was the first member of the British royal family to be interviewed on TV? Prince Philip (Panorama, May 1961)
What was the title of James Dean's last film? Giant
Who is the voice of Marty the Zebra in the 2005 film Madagascar? Chris Rock
The song Oh What a Beautiful Morning comes from which musical? Oklahoma
Who was the assassination target in Frederick Forsyth's book The Day of the Jackal? President Charles de Gaulle of France
Elizabeth Bennet is the heroine of which Jane Austen novel? Pride and Prejudice
Which independent record label launched Elvis Costello in the 1970's? Stiff Records
What is rap artist Eminem's original name? Marshall Mathers
The Inn of the Sixth Happiness starring Ingrid Bergman is a biopic about which missionary and her work in China? Gladys Aylward
Who performed the title song All Time High for the 1983 Bond film Octopussy? Rita Coolidge
Which composer wrote the 1936 classical work Peter and the Wolf? Sergei Prokofiev
Who played Captain Virgil Hilts in the 1963 film The Great Escape? Steve McQueen
What is the island on which Jim Carey's character lives in the 1998 film The Truman Show? Seahaven
Tony Curtis reportedly said of which actress that kissing her was like kissing Hitler? Marilyn Monroe
What is the enchanted land called in C S Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe? Narnia
What is the surname of Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry film character? Callaghan
Which 1942 film has the closing line, "Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship"? Casablanca
What is the name of Hyacinth and Richard Bucket's son in British TV's Keeping Up Appearances? Sheridan
The battle dramatized in the 2001 film Black Hawk Down took place in what African country? Somalia (in the city of Mogadishu)
What is the name of Ned Flanders' late wife in TV's The Simpsons? Maude
Who directed the 1999 film American Beauty? Sam Mendes
Who was the captain of the sci-fi submarine Stingray? Troy Tempest
What is the name of the news photographer in Federico Fellini's 1959 film La Dolce Vita? Paparazzo (played by Walter Santesso, the Signore Paparazzo character gave rise to the modern slang term for freelance photographers, Paparazzi. The singular term is actually paparazzo. Paparazzo is apparently an Italian word for a mosquito.)
quizballs 34 catch-phrase quiz
What or who first made these catch-phrases famous?

1. I'll be back.. The Terminator - the 1984 film, as spoken by the Terminator character, played by Arnold Schwarzenneger.
2. Lovely Jubbly! (or Luvvly Jubbly!) Derek 'Del Boy' Trotter - played by David Jason in the 1980's-90's BBC TV comedy show Only Fools and Horses.
3. Correctomundo Fonzie/The Fonz/Arthur Fonzarelli - played by Henry Winkler in the 1970's-80's US comedy series Happy Days.
4. Famous for fifteen minutes. Andy Warhol - US pop artist - he first used it in a 1968 exhibition catalogue. Years later, when tiring of constant reference to the phrase, he coined the ironic amusing variation: "In fifteen minutes, everybody will be famous."
5. And now for something completely different... Monty Python's Flying Circus - BBC TV comedy show, 1960's-70's, written by Cleese, Palin, Jones, etc. Eric Idle was first to use the phrase as 'the Monty Python announcer' in the show's first episode on 5 October 1969, although John Cleese chiefly delivered the line in later shows.
6. Whassup? (or Wazzup?) Budweiser beer commercials - or the full company name Anheuser-Busch Budweiser - the 'Wassup' Budweiser beer TV commercials campaign was launched around 2000 - the concept was created by Charles Stone and popularized in the Budweiser ads produced by the DDB advertising agency of Chicago.
7. Does my bum look big in this? 'The Insecure Woman' character, played by Arabella Weir, in The Fast Show - created Paul Whitehouse and Charlie Higson, 1990's.
8. Big Brother (is watching you..) 1984 - the dark futuristic novel by George Orwell, published in 1949 - the phrase appeared in the description of a government poster, in part 1, chapter 1.
9. And so to bed. Samuel Pepys - pronounced 'peeps' - from Samuel Pepys's Diary, one of the most signicant written works describing 17th century life in England, written 1660-69.
10. I love it when a plan comes together. Colonel John 'Hannibal' Smith, played by George Peppard, from the 1980's US TV action series The A-Team.
11. Evening all. (or Evenin' all.) PC George Dixon - the main character of Dixon of Dock Green, the 1950's-70's BBC TV police series.
12. Show me the money! Jerry Maguire - the 1996 film, shouted by footballer Rod Tidwell, played by Cuba Gooding Junior.
13. You bet your sweet bippy. Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in - US comedy series from the 1960's-70's, in which numerous guests used the phrase and variations of it. Bippy incidentally is a euphemism for backside or buttocks.
14. Be all that you can be. US Army recruitment slogan from the late 1970's to 2001. Maybe one day all political leaders will meet the same selfless standards that they expect of their soldiers. (No points for that comment because it's far too obvious)
15. Every day, in every way, I am getting better and better. Emile Coue - pronounced 'coo-ay', (and properly spelled Émile Coué, with the accents acute) - Coué, a the French positive thinking advodate and teacher, popularized the expression as part of his widely adopted and frequently very successful auto-suggestion therapy and personal development methods during the 1920's. Coué's concepts became known as Couesm - technically Couéism - for which, at the quizmaster's discretion, a special bonus of several million points might arguably be deserved.
16. You're going to like this - not a lot.. (but you'll like it..) Paul Daniels - British magician and TV show host, he popularized the expression notably on The Paul Daniels Magic Show which ran from 1979-94.
17. The world is your lobster. Arthur Daley, played by George Cole, in the Minder ITV series, first broadcast in 1979 and hugely popular during the 1980's.
18. (It's) Naughty... but nice. Cream cakes TV advert by the National Dairy Council which appeared on UK television in the 1980's.
19. To infinity, and beyond.. Buzz Lightyear, voice played by Tim Allen, in the 1995 film animation Toy Story.
20. He can run, but he can't hide. (also adapted to You can run, but you can't hide/They can

quizballs 35 - free history quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Who was the last British Viceroy of India? Lord Louis Mountbatten
Who was the ruler of the USSR from 1917-22? Vladimir Lenin
The Wars of the Roses (1455-85) were fought between which two houses of England? York and Lancaster
In which year did the UK hand over Hong Kong sovereignty to China? 1997 (June 30th)
Who invented the thermometer in 1593? Galileo
Which Wild West legend was born Henry McCarty? Billy the Kid, alias William H Bonney
Who was UK Labour cabinet minister and social reformer Frank Pakenham better known as? Lord Longford (7th Earl of Longford)
What was the name of the pandemic which killed over 1% of the world's population in 1918? Spanish Flu
What was the name of Charles Lindbergh's plane in which he completed the first non-stop solo trans-Atlantic flight? Spirit of St Louis (achieved in 1927)
Which comic strip animal devised by Otto Mesmer first appeared in 1931? Felix the Cat
What song, popular in the First World War, was written by George and Felix Powell? Pack up your Troubles in your Old Kit Bag
In which year did the Titanic sink? 1912
What Apollo 13 astronaut contacted Mission Control with the words, "Houston, we've had a problem here.." ? Jack Swigert
Which country was first to operate an old age pension scheme? Germany (1891)
The Battle of Rorke's Drift in 1879 featured in which war? Zulu War (or Zulu Wars). Incidentally Rorke's Drift was not the final battle of the Zulu Wars as wrongly stated here previously - it was the battle of Ulundi (thanks A Cherry)
In which European city did composer Richard Wagner die in 1883? Venice
Who discovered the vaccination against smallpox in 1796? Edward Jenner
Which is the oldest University in the USA? Harvard (founded 1636, in Cambridge Massachusetts)
Who was the cult leader of the Waco Siege in 1993? David Koresh
Which Egyptian president ordered the seizure of the Suez Canal in 1956? President Nassar
Who founded the Salvation Army in London, 1865? William Booth
Who designed Regent's Park in London in 1811? John Nash
Southern Rhodesia became what country in 1980? Zimbabwe (The Independent Nation of Zimbabwe)
In 1979 which English art historian was exposed as a one-time Soviet spy and stripped of his knighthood? Anthony Blunt
In 1816 which US state was admitted to the Union as the 20th state? Mississippi
In which year did the demolition of the Berlin Wall begin? 1989
Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI created which principality in 1719? Lichtenstein
in 1986 the prime minister of which European country was assassinated on his way home from the cinema with his wife? Sweden (Olof Palme)
Who was the first Windsor monarch of the UK? George V (reigned 1910-1936)
What was the nickname of President Duvalier of Haiti, who died in 1971? Papa Doc
quizballs 36 - free entertainment quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Who played Al Capone in the 1987 film, The Untouchables? Robert De Niro
Which character did James Stewart play in the 1952 film, The Greatest Show On Earth? Buttons the Clown
Who wrote the novel On Chesil Beach? Ian McEwan
What is the surname of the family in the UK TV series My Family? Harper
Which instrument represents the duck in Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf? Oboe
Who played Richard Cunningham in the US TV show Happy Days? Ron Howard
How to Save a Life was which band's debut album? The Fray
Which UK TV series was based on Eric Chappell's play The Banana Box? Rising Damp
Jan Morrow and Brad Allen are characters who share a phone line in which 1959 film? Pillow Talk (starring Rock Hudson and Doris Day)
How many contestants' boxes feature in the (UK version) TV show Deal of No Deal? Twenty-two (eleven 'reds' and eleven 'blues')
By what name was rapper Christopher Wallace most famously known? The Notorious B.I.G. (aka Biggie Smalls, Frank White, and Big Poppa - maybe worth a half-point bonus each..)
Who played the Russian mail-order bride in the 2001 film Birthday Girl? Nicole Kidman
Daisy Donovan, Iain Lee, and MacKenzie Crook were presenters on which 1990's UK TV show? The 11 O'Clock Show
What is the number on the roof of the bus in the 1994 film Speed? 2525
Pixel, Stingy and Stephanie appear in which children's TV programme? LazyTown
In which year was the UK Comic Relief launched? 1985
What is the name of the title character in Arthur Miller's play Death of a Salesman? Willy Loman
In the 1979 film Apocalypse Now which river does Captain Willard (Martin Sheen) travel up to reach Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando)? Nung
What is the first name of Frank Gallagher's legal wife in the UK TV series Shameless? Monica
In which US state did Buddy Holly's plane crash in 1959? Iowa
Nicky Hambleton-Jones presents which UK TV make-over show? Ten Years Younger
What was Humphrey Bogart's last film? The Harder They Fall (1956, in which Bogart played jobless sportswriter Eddie Willis)
What was mixed with water to make the rain more visible on screen in the 1952 film Singing in the Rain? Milk
What is the name of the family doctor in The Simpsons cartoon show? Doctor Julius Hibbert
Who played Domino in the 1983 Bond film Never Say Never Again? Kim Basinger
Who designed the costumes for the 1997 film The Fifth Element? Jean-Paul Gaultier
Doctor Moriarty is the arch-enemy of which fictional detective? Sherlock Holmes (created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 - Moriarty was apparently the name of a real boy from Conan Doyle's college days)
What was the title of George Michael's first solo album? Faith (1987)
Brad Pitt played one of Anthony Hopkins' three sons in which 1994 film? Legends of the Fall (Pitt's character is Tristan Ludlow; the other brothers are Samuel and Alfred. William is the dad.)
Tall Dark and Gruesome is the title of whose autobiography? Christopher Lee
quizballs 37 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Agadir is a port in which North African country? Morocco
Which acid is produced in the muscles during strenuous exercise? Lactic
What is the sloping part of a horse's foot between the fetlock and the hoof? Pastern
What is the name of the cement mixer in the children's TV series Bob the Builder? Dizzy
Cereology is the study of what? Crop circles
What one of the seven continents stretches from the Northern Temperate to the Southern Temperate zones? Africa (the other generally recognised continents are N America, S America, Asia, Europe, Antarctica and Australia - the Temperate zones are those between the tropics and the polar circles)
Arboreal describes a creature which commonly lives in what? Trees (bushes is also acceptable - arbor is latin for tree)
The secret ingredient of which product is code-named 'merchandise 7X'? Coca-Cola
Which actor appeared in every episode of the TV series M*A*S*H? Alan Alda
According to official records how many people died in the Great Fire of London of 1666? Six
The World Health Organization is an agency of which larger body? The United Nations (UN)
What is the tenth letter of the Greek alphabet? Kappa (equivalent to the letter K, as in look)
Ergophobia is a fear of what? Work
In what country is the Valley of the Kings? Egypt
Pauline Matthews duetted on a big 1970's hit record under what better known name? Kiki Dee
Who founded the UK's Today newspaper in 1986? Eddie Shah
Where in the body are the olfactory nerves? Nose
What is the emblem of Canada? Maple leaf
In the Bible what is the third book of the Old Testament? Leviticus
How many points does a converted try score in Rugby Union? Seven (five points for the try and two for the conversion kick)
What do the initials of animal rights organization PETA stand for? People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
Who in Greek mythology was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra? Agamemnon
What was Doris Day's first UK number one hit record? Secret Love (1954 - followed by Whatever Will Be Will Be [Que Sera, Sera], her second and final UK No1 in 1956)
Which country produces Jarlsberg cheese? Norway
Shisha, nargile, argeela and ghalyan are all names relating to what hugely popular and culturally significant custom? The hookah smoking pipe (or hubble-bubble or water pipe - the hoohah and hookah cafes are as common in the Eastern world as cigarettes and pubs have traditionally been in the West - and no better for your health)
How many lines are in a limerick? Five
Which infamous Englishman's prison number was FF8282? Jeffrey Archer
In which decade was Sydney Harbour Bridge opened? 1930's (1932 to be precise)
Who is seventh in line to the British throne (as at May 2007)? Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex (King Harald V of Norway is apparently 61st in line, several million ahead of you and me)
What was the name of the world's first nuclear submarine? USS Nautilus (launched in Connecticut 1954)
Who captained Germany's soccer team in the 1966 World Cup Final? Uwe Seeler
What colour dye is tartrazine? Yellow (yellow number 5 to be precise)
The restrictive medical condition epicondylitis is commonly known as what? Tennis elbow
What is the name of the cap worn by Roman Catholic clergymen? Biretta
Aside from Russia what is the largest country in Europe? Ukraine
American explorer Robert Peary is generally regarded as the first to reach where in 1909? The North Pole
Which planet has the Great Red Spot in its atmosphere? Jupiter
Trinitrotoluene is better known as what? TNT (the chemical explosive)
A gift of china is traditionally given to celebrate how many years of marriage in the UK and USA? Twenty
Who wrote the opera Tristan and Isolde? Richard Wilhelm Wagner (1813-83)
In which country is the carved (that's carved, not caved) city of Petra? Jordan
The pistil is the reproductive organ of what? A flower
Geoffrey Palmer was the prime minister of which country 1989-90? New Zealand
Discovery, Gillyflower and Rome Beauty are types of which fruit? Apple
What are the Sandwich Islands now called? Hawaii (the US state is known as Hawaii even though Hawaii is one of many of the islands, also known as the Hawaiian Islands, or the Hawaiian Windward Islands, all of which would be acceptable correct answers)
Who wrote The Divine Comedy? Dante (Dante Alighieri, aka Durante degli Alighieri, 1265-1321, in Italian the epic poem was originally called Commedia)
What was controversially legalised on a voluntary basis in Australia's Northern territory in 1995? Euthanasia
Amsterdam lies on which river? Amstel
How many bones are in the human hand? Twenty-seven
What animal is Friar Tuck in the Disney animated version of Robin Hood? Badger
quizballs 38 - free weather and climate quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
(Further interesting/trivia background detail is available for some of these answers below.)

Which one of these revolving weather systems is the smallest - hurricane, typhoon, tropical cyclone, tornado? Tornado
Aside of the amusing reference popularized by Frank Zappa, what is the usual cause of a large-scale 'yellow snow' weather effect seen in certain parts of the world? Pollen
What is the line on a weather chart which joins points of equal pressure? Isobar
What colour of a single rainbow is on the inside of the rainbow's arc, given the generally defined seven-colour rainbow? Violet
Who invented the mercury thermometer? Daniel Gabriel Farenheit
Okta is a unit of measurement of what? Cloud cover
What common term refers to the amount of water vapour that is held in the air? Humidity
Treasure Island author Robert Louis Stevenson's father was responsible for what significant weather-related invention? The Stevenson Screen
What shipping forecast area lies immediately South of Forties off the British Isles? Dogger
What common term refers to the movement of air from a high pressure to a low pressure zone? Wind
What is O3 (O followed by the number 3, usually shown in sub-script)? Ozone
What wind speed limit applies for setting athletics sprinting and jumping records? Two metres per second
What were all girls from 1953 to 1979, and thereafter alternating boys and girls? Names of tropical storms or hurricanes
What is the circulating Atlantic ocean current which warms Western Europe? The Gulf Stream
What's the more exotic name of the 'Northern Lights' visible under certain conditions in the Northern Hemisphere night sky? Aurora Borealis
What is a haboob? A sandstorm
What is the childlike name given to the significant weather activity linked to sea temperature rise in the Pacific Ocean? El Nino
What are the narrow bands of strong winds called which move around the world between about six and twelve miles high? Jet Streams
What is the unit of measurement of wind speed? Knot
What is the 'ology' term for the study or science of the weather (that's short-term weather systems and effects, not long-term climatology)? Meteorology
What was the name of the 1992 hurricane storm which caused massive damage to the Bahamas, Florida and Louisiana? Andrew
Towards which direction (North, East, South or West) is a rainbow normally seen in the afternoon? East
What cloud term means 'sheet' or 'sheetlike' or 'layer'? Stratus
(Aside from a back and a front) how many sides or points does every snowflake have? Six
The 'Inter-tropical Convergence Zone', where the trade winds meet near the equator to produce a band of relatively very still air, which can strand sailing ships, is known more prosaically as what? The Doldrums
In the Northern hemisphere an area of low pressure produces what wind direction? Anti-clockwise
What is the most common gas in the earth's atmosphere? Nitrogen
What type of cloud is normally associated with thunderstorms? Cumulonimbus
The heaviest recorded hailstones weighed (approximately) 25gms, 100gms, 500gms or 1kg? 1kg
What number does 'storm' equate to on the Beaufort Scale of wind force? 10
What is minus 40 degrees Farenheit expressed as degrees Centigrade? minus 40, the same (Thanks R Partis for this excellent question.)


more detailed answers and trivia
Which one of these revolving weather systems is the smallest - hurricane, typhoon, tropical cyclone, tornado? Tornado (a tornado is a funnel of violently circulating air connected from the ground to a large storm cloud. A tornado has a diameter of anything between a few metres and 2 miles in extreme cases. Tornadoes generally travel no more than a few miles before dissipating, and can occur in most parts of the world. Hurricanes, typhoons and tropical cyclones are all terms from different parts of the world for a big revolving tropical storm, typically several hundred miles wide, emanating from the tropical ocean areas, and which incidentally can contain tornadoes when the storm moves over land. Hurricane activity peaks when the difference between sea temperature and upper atmospheric temperature is greatest, which to a certain extent produces predictable repeating storm seasons according to the regions in which they occur.)
Aside of the amusing reference popularized by Frank Zappa, what is the usual cause of a large-scale 'yellow snow' weather effect seen in certain parts of the world? Pollen (typically from cypress pine trees)
What is the line on a weather chart which joins points of equal pressure? Isobar (the term first appeared around 1864, and is from the Greek word isobares meaning 'of equal weight')
What colour of a single rainbow is on the inside of the rainbow's arc, given the generally defined seven-colour rainbow? Violet (The traditionally defined colours of the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet. A single rainbow displays these colours from red on the outside of the arc to violet on the inside of the arc. In a double rainbow the second outer rainbow displays the colours in reverse the order. A rainbow in fact contains infinitely more than seven colour variations, but the seven colour system is the most widely used, which can be traced back to Isaac Newton's studies of prisms and light refraction in the 1670's. The seven-colour system probably persists partly due to the mnemonic aids used to remember them, notably 'Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain', or the more obscure 'Roy G Biv'.)
Who invented the mercury thermometer? Daniel Gabriel Farenheit (1714 - Farenheit was German but worked mostly in the Dutch Republic. Galileo Galilei actually first devised the thermometer principle using water in 1593.)
Okta is a unit of measurement of what? Cloud cover (according to the UN's weather and climate agency, the World Meteorological Organization, an Okta is a "Fraction equal to one eighth of the celestial dome, used in the coding of cloud amount." The scale is actually made of nine parts because there is a zero, and ranges from 0 okta - clear sky, to 8 oktas - completely overcast. The steps are typically interpreted as: 0-2 oktas are 'Fine', 3-5 oktas are 'Partly Cloudy', 6-7 oktas are 'Cloudy', and 8 is 'Overcast'. The derivation - thanks P Lubbers - is related to Latin 'octo' meaning eight, as in octopus and October, and more exactly the word okta is Greek for eight, and 'oktas' is Greek for 'a group of eight'.)
What common term refers to the amount of water vapour that is held in the air? Humidity (Hotter air holds more moisture, or water vapour. Water vapour is a 'greenhouse gas'. Greenhouse gases cause temperatures to rise because they absorb energy. The hotter air holds still more moisture.)
Treasure Island author Robert Louis Stevenson's father was responsible for what significant weather-related invention? The Stevenson Screen (the strange white wooden box on legs for protecting weather instruments and increasing the consistency of measurements)
What shipping forecast area lies immediately South of Forties off the British Isles? Dogger (the full list is: Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire, Forties, Cromarty, Forth, Tyne, Dogger, Fisher, German Bight, Humber, Thames, Dover, Wight, Portland, Plymouth, Biscay, FitzRoy, Trafalgar, Sole, Lundy, Fastnet, Irish Sea, Shannon, Rockall, Malin, Hebrides, Bailey, Fair Isle, Faeroes, South-east Iceland)
What common term refers to the movement of air from a high pressure to a low pressure zone? Wind (not surprisingly a very old word indeed, first recorded in this form in AD725 in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, and traceable along with similar sounding foreign equivalent words for wind back to the earliest languages of European settlers)
What is O3 (O followed by the number 3, usually shown in sub-script)? Ozone (also called activated oxygen, allotropic oxygen, triatomic oxygen or pure air; ozone is a fascinating gas: it is created from oxygen by ultraviolet radiation and thunderstorms; you can smell ozone by sniffing the air close to a spark-marking gas oven lighter, which in a tiny way replicates the ozone-creating effect of lightning in the atmosphere; it's a powerful disinfectant; it can purify water and preserve fruit and vegetables; it is refreshing in small doses and poisonous in large doses; it makes the sky blue; and in a warm temperature it reverts back to oxygen, O2, after just a few minutes)
What wind speed limit applies for setting athletics sprinting and jumping records? Two metres per second (regardless of direction)
What were all girls from 1953 to 1979, and thereafter alternating boys and girls? Names of tropical storms or hurricanes (as named by the US National Hurricane Centre in Miami Florida, which administers the lists of names to identify Atlantic tropical storms; names are English, Spanish or French and used on a six year rotating basis, unless belonging to a paricularly disasterous storm, in which case the name is removed from the list)
What is the circulating Atlantic ocean current which warms Western Europe? The Gulf Stream (emanating from the Gulf of Mexico, and responsible for giving Western Europe warmer weather than would likely be experienced without the effect of the Gulf Stream. Climatologists continue to debate whether the Gulf Stream will be affected by global warming - some say that the Gulf Stream is threatened by melting ice from the North, with the ironic effect of reducing temperatures in Western Europe, despite the warming going on everywhere else in the world)
What's the more exotic name of the 'Northern Lights' visible under certain conditions in the Northern Hemisphere night sky? Aurora Borealis (the Southern Hemisphere equivalent is the Aurora Australis - both North and South phenomena result from atoms colliding in the upper atmosphere, becoming energised and then giving off their energy as light, the colour of which varies according to the atomic gases and altitudes involved.)
What is a haboob? A sandstorm (a haboob is a big sandstorm, most common in the Sahara and Arabian peninsula, but also occurring in Arizona, typically following thunderstorms)
What is the childlike name given to the significant weather activity linked to sea temperature rise in the Pacific Ocean? El Nino (properly 'Niño' and pronounced 'neenyo' - it means 'the little boy', or 'Christ child', and causes severe weather of various sorts notably in South America and the Western Pacific region) (thanks R Hannah)
What are the narrow bands of strong winds called which move around the world between about six and twelve miles high? Jet Streams (Airlines make use of jet streams to optimise travel times, although this has nothing to do with the word jet in this context, which derives ultimately from the Latin root jectare, to throw forth, which gave us the words project and projectile, and came to English via the French jeter, to throw)
What is the unit of measurement of wind speed? Knot (1 knot equals approximately 1.15 miles per hour - the word knot is derived from the original method of measuring a vessel's speed though the water by counting over a given time the number of spaced knots on a length of rope dragged over a ship's stern by a specially shaped piece of wood on the end of the rope)
What is the 'ology' term for the study or science of the weather (that's short-term weather systems and effects, not long-term climatology)? Meteorology (from the Greek 'things high up' added to 'logos' meaning knowledge)
What was the name of the 1992 hurricane storm which caused massive damage to the Bahamas, Florida and Louisiana? Andrew (Until Katrina, hurricane Andrew was the most destructive in US history, causing damage then estimated at $26bn. Andrew was replaced by Alex in the rota of hurricane names)
Towards which direction (North, East, South or West) is a rainbow normally seen in the afternoon? East (because sunlight is usually from behind the viewer - so morning rainbows are normally in the West - sun rises in the East and sets in the West)
What cloud term means 'sheet' or 'sheetlike' or 'layer'? Stratus (aside from which, cirrus means 'fibre', and cumulus means 'heap', and these with stratus are the three main cloud types established by London meteorologist Luke Howard when he set up the cloud name system published in 1803 and still in use today, albeit slightly increased from his original seven-cloud structure. It is said that when the World Meteorological Organisation added the ninth cloud type, cumulonimbus, to the structure in 1896 this gave rise to the expression 'on cloud nine')
(Aside from a back and a front) how many sides or points does every snowflake have? Six (and every snowflake is different, although how they can be absolutely sure of that I really don't know..)
The 'Inter-tropical Convergence Zone', where the trade winds meet near the equator to produce a band of relatively very still air, which can strand sailing ships, is known more prosaically as what? The Doldrums (the same convergence also creates heavy rainfall which on land is partly responsible for the rain forests)
In the Northern hemisphere an area of low pressure produces what wind direction? Anti-clockwise (and clockwise in the Southern hemisphere. An area of low pressure - also called a depression or cyclone - is typically associated with clouds and wet and stormy weather. An area of high pressure - an anticyclone - is normally associated with fair dry weather and blue skies. Wind direction around an anticyclone is clockwise in the Northern hemisphere and anti-clockwise in the Southern hemisphere. Air movement, or wind, is logically towards low pressure and away from high pressure, but the rotation of the Earth causes the movement to spiral. This is known as the Coriolis Effect, which forces the cyclone or anticyclone along a curved path, and thus makes it spin.)
What is the most common gas in the earth's atmosphere? Nitrogen (accounting for about 78%, followed by about 20% Oxygen, and relatively far smaller amounts of other gases including Argon, Carbon Dioxide, Neon, Methane, Helium, Ozone and water vapour)
What type of cloud is normally associated with thunderstorms? Cumulonimbus (each towering cumulonimbus thundercloud takes an average of about an hour to form and to dissipate, from start to finish, during which it will dispense a maximum of about 30 minutes thunder and lightning - according to the UK Met Office)
The heaviest recorded hailstones weighed (approximately) 25gms, 100gms, 500gms or 1kg? 1kg (that's one kilogram - among various reports of unfeasibly large hailstones, the heaviest recorded - according to the UK Met Office and Guinness Book of Records - are the 1kg hailstones that fell on Gopalanj in Bangladesh on 14 April 1986 and killed 92 people. The heaviest recorded hailstone in the UK was apparently 142gms, in Horsham West Sussex in 1958.)
What number does 'storm' equate to on the Beaufort Scale of wind force? 10. The Beaufort Scale was published in 1805 by Irish hydrographer (navigable waters expert) Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort but he was not the first to devise such a scale. The UK Met Office has records of similar definitions appearing on much earlier representations of wind force scales, notably including the 'Table of Degrees' recorded in 1703 by writer and adventurer Daniel Defoe, who is better known for his books Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders.
Here is the Beaufort Scale:

0 - calm
1 - light air
2 - light breeze
3 - gentle breeze
4 - moderate wind
5 - fresh wind
6 - strong wind
7 - very strong wind or near gale
8 - gale
9 - severe gale
10 - storm
11 - severe storm or violent storm
12 - hurricane
What is minus 40 degrees Farenheit expressed as degrees Centigrade? minus 40, the same (Thanks R Partis for this excellent question.) To convert Farenheit to Centigrade first subtract 32, then multiply by 5 and divide by 9. To convert Centigrade to Farenheit, apply the formula in reverse, i.e., divide by 5, multiply by 9, then add 32.
quizballs 39 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

Which country has the shortest coastline? Monaco (3.5 miles)
What Italian term describes the mood of a piece of music as sweet? Dolce (pronounced dolchay)
What famous saying, representing a deranged and directionless group of people, has been interpreted in creative works by Hieronymus Bosch, Katherine Anne Porter, Erasure, The Grateful Dead, and Bob Seger, among others? Ship of Fools
Kim Campbell was the first woman prime minister of which country? Canada (She served from 25 June to 4 November 1993, succeeding Brian Mulroney.)
What is the French meaning of 'Marmite'? Cooking pot (or stew pan - there is a picture of one on the Marmite label.)
In architecture, cartouche is a decorative feature resembling what? A scroll
According to his memoirs, what famous Venetian adventurer was once imprisoned as a magician, a director of the Paris state lotteries, knighted in the Netherlands, a spy for Louis XV, and a librarian in Bohemia? Casanova (fully, Giacomo Girolamo Casanova de Seingalt, 1725-98)
What is the name of the street in London famous for its tailors shops? Savile Row
Who was the 'father of medicine' to whom a code of medical ethics is attributed and which bears his name? Hippocrates (Hippocrates, c.460-370BC, is regarded first to have defined the principles of the Hippocratic Oath, hence its name.)
What shape is farfalle pasta? Bow tie (or butterfly, which is what farfalle means in Italian.)
Pb is the symbol for which chemical element? Lead (derived from the Latin 'plumbum', from which the word plumber also derives - because the first plumbers used lead for pipes, etc.)
What city did Charles II of England sell to France in 1662 for £40,000? Dunkirk
From which creatures can Newcastle disease transfer to humans, causing mild conjunctivitis and flu symptoms? Birds (especially poultry - apparently first discovered in the East Indies in 1926 it was identified later in Newcastle-upon-Tyne a year later, hence the name.)
What household gadget did Melville R Bissell invent 1876? Carpet sweeper
British Landrace, Pietrain and Tamworth are what sort of animals? Pigs (they are all domesticated pig breeds)
Lee Kuan Yew became the first officially elected prime minister of which country in 1959? Singapore (The Republic of Singapore, from the Malay words singa - lion, and pura - city. Singapore became independent of Malaysia in 1965, prior to which it was a British colony until 1959. Singapore is about twenty-five times more densely populated than the UK, and in fact only Monaco is more crowded of all the countries of the world.)
Who was rumoured to to have had his first wife Amy Robsart poisoned, in the hope of marrying Queen Elizabeth the First? Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester
A Salchow (usually pronounced 'salco' or 'salcov') is a jump in which sport? Figure skating (after Swedish skater Ulrich Salchow, its inventor and the first to perform the jump in major competition, in 1909. The jump involves a full revolution in the air, normally taking off and landing on different feet, and can be extended to more than one revolution, hence 'triple salchow', which obviously is three. No-one has managed anything more than a quadruple Salchow. )
What is the capital of Barbados? Bridgetown
Of Albanian descent, by what name is 1979 Nobel Prizewinner Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu better known? Mother Teresa
Mjosa (more precisely Mjøsa) is the largest lake of which country? Norway (can anyone please clarify the pronunciation of Mjøsa?)
How would 'good day' normally be said in Japanese? Konnichi wa (or similar, for example ko-nee-chee-wa)
What is the highest volcano in Africa? Kilimanjaro (aka Kilima Njaro, Kilima Dscharo, and Oldoinyo Oibor. Kilimanjaro is also Africa's highest mountain, almost 20,000 feet high, with an estimated total volume of 1,150 cubic miles. In modern times Kilimanjaro emits little more than steam and sulphur. Kilimanjaro is in Tanzania on the Kenyan border, close to Mombassa and Nairobi in Kenya, and to Lake Victoria, and is one of about 20 volcanoes in the East African Rift Valley.)
The German Deutschmark was comprised of one hundred what? Pfennig
'Atoms for Peace', formed in 1957, is now known as what? The International Atomic Energy Agency (The IAEA, based in Vienna, is an independent and specialised agency of the United Nations, and seeks to promote peaceful and safe use of nuclear energy.)
A biathlon consists of which two sports? Skiing and shooting (cross-country skiing and rifle-shooting to be exact - in that order)
The word deltiologist, derived from the Greek 'deltos' meaning writing-tablet, refers to a collector of what? Postcards (picture postcards more precisely)
Who wrote in 1770 "If God did not exist it would be necessary to invent him"? Voltaire (or real name Francois Marie Arouet, 1694-1778, French writer, philosopher and historian. The quote is from his epistle: Letter to the Author of The Three Impostors, or in French, Épître à l'Auteur du Livre des Trois Imposteurs, dated 10 November 1770.)
What year did the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France open? 1994 (The official opening was 6 May 1994, in Calais, performed by Queen Elizabeth II and President Francois Mitterrand. Interestingly, the French chose to retrieve their huge tunnel boring machine, while the British chose to leave theirs in the tunnel, buried in concrete.)
Which tragic figure of Greek mythology became the King of Thebes after solving the Sphinx's riddle to guess what walks on four legs in the morning, two in the afternoon and three in the evening? Oedipus (The answer to the riddle was 'Man', who in life first crawls, then walks, and finally walks with a stick. The psychoanalyst Freud's choice of the term 'Oedipus Complex' to describe a male's infatuation with his mother is based on the story of Oedipus, in which the King casts his baby son and heir Oedipus out of the city to die, so as to avert a prophecy that Oedipus will one day kill his father to become King and also take the Queen as his wife, which does indeed happen. There is a more to the story, and I'll not spoil the ending.)
quizballs 40 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

The Aconcagua is the highest peak in which mountain range? Andes (Aconcagua is 22,834 feet high, and is in Argentina)
What of these sports bodies was founded first, the AAA, FA, MCC or IOC? MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club, formed in 1787, is the governing body of world cricket. The Football Association was formed in 1863, Amateur Athletics Association in 1880, and the International Olympic Committee in 1894)
Who was president of the USSR from 1982-84? Yuri Andropov (1914-84, he died in office from various problems related to kidney failure. Andropov was preceded by Leonid Brezhnev and succeeded by Konstantin Chernenko, and can be credited for grooming the reforming Mikhail Gorbachev for leadership)
What was American silent film star 'Fatty' Arbuckle's first name? Roscoe
The character Roger 'Race' Bannon appeared as a boy's bodyguard in which cartoon series? Jonny Quest (the Hanna-Barbera action-adventure animation made from 1964-65 was one of the earliest targets for criticism about scenes of violence in children's TV programmes. Bonus points for knowing the name of Jonny's dog: Bandit)
Guru Nanak Dev founded which religion? Sikhism (the basis of the Sikh religion was established in the late 1400's by Guru Nanak, 1469-1539, formalised later in what became known as the Adi Granth, defining the three pillars of Sikhism; namely daily meditation and chanting, working productively and honestly, and sharing and giving)
The Phoenix Park murders of 1882 took place in which city? Dublin (Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke, the second and third most senior ministers in the British government of Ireland were victims of the Irish Invincibles, an Irish nationalist group)
Who designed the famous Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona? Gaudi (Antoni Gaudi i Cornet, 1852-1926 - work on Sagrada Familia started in 1884 and amazingly it is still being built)
Who was Henry VIII's third wife? Jane Seymour (1509-37, married 1536-7, mother of future Edward VI, but died 12 days after the birth - no doubt before Henry had a chance to find something wrong with her and have her executed..)
From which seeds is tahini made? Sesame (tahini is a paste used especially in Middle Eastern and Oriental savoury cuisine)
What is the human ailment epistaxis better known as? Nosebleed
The Kariba Dam is on which river? Zambezi (or Zambesi - it starts in Zambia and eventually reaches the Indian Ocean in Mozambique, passing over Victoria Falls along the way. The dam lies between Zambia and Zimbabwe who share its electrical output. Apparently four of the 87 men who died building it remain buried in the concrete)
What does the B stand for in Lyndon B Johnson? Baines (Lyndon B Johnson, 1908-73, also known as LBJ, 36th president of the USA, succeeded John F Kennedy in 1963, and held office until retirement in January 1969)
What item of attire is a leghorn? Hat (made of straw)
What does an oologist collect? Birds' eggs
The Neanderthal Museum is in which country? Germany (near Mettmann, in Western Germany between Dusseldorf and Wuppertal)
In which country is the European Court of Human Rights? France (in Strasbourg - the European Court of Human Rights has jurisdiction over the contracting nations of the Council of Europe, founded in 1949 to develop European democratic principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights. As at June 2007 there are 47 contracting nations)
In British history a Cavalier was a supporter of which king? Charles I (the royalist 'Cavaliers' fought the 'Roundheads' in the English Civil War 1642-51. The name Cavalier referred to the arrogant fashion and attitude associated with cavalry officers. Roundhead referred to the pudding-bowl hairstyles favoured by the anti-royalists which contrasted with the flamboyant long curls of their opponents. Just like the mods and the rockers..)
Leporine relates to which animal? Hare
In Greek mythology who was Apollo's twin sister? Artemis (Goddess of the Hunt and Wild, sometimes extending to the Moon too, daughter of Zeus, handy with a bow and arrow, and generally not the type of girl to mess around)
Assassinated in 1965, who was Malcolm Little better known as? Malcolm X (1925-65, American black nationalist leader, also known by his adopted Muslim name el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz)
What was the name of Ernest Shackleton's ship which became stuck in Antarctic ice in 1915? HMS Endurance
By what name was Dutch dancer Margarethe Zelle better known? Mata Hari (1876-1917, famous for her relationships with powerful men on both sides of the First World War, ending with her execution by the French, accused of spying for Germany, although doubts remain as to the reliability of the evidence and the conviction - her stage name Mata Hari is Indonesian for sun - literally 'eye of the day')
Which famous US lawman had brothers called Morgan and Virgil? Wyatt Earp (famed for his involvement in the 1881 Gunfight at the OK Corral, Tombstone, Arizona, when the Earps and Doc Holliday fought the Clantons and McLaurys)
What was the name of the cruise ship seized by hijackers in the Mediterranean in 1985? Achille Lauro
What type of creature is an amberjack? Fish (found and fished in warm coastal waters around the world)
In 1968 which US artist and film maker was shot and wounded by actress Valerie Solanas? Andy Warhol
Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body? Throat
What is the capital of Croatia? Zagreb (whoch loosely means grab, and possible relates grabbing or taking water)
What is the international distress signal one level below and less serious than a 'Mayday' call? Pan-pan (usually three times, and pronounced 'pawn-pawn' - the Morse code equivalent is TTT. The term is from the French word panne meaning breakdown. Incidentally Mayday - Morse equivalent SOS - is from French m'aider meaning help me, more fully explained in the expressions origins section. The French word sécurité - again usually announced three times - is the third level of emergency, typically used for maritime navigational or weather warnings)
Carambola is another name for which fruit? Star fruit (also known as a kamranga or coromandel gooseberry)
In 1902 the Treaty of Vereeniging brought which war to an end? The Second Boer War (there were two Boer Wars - the First Boer War was 1880–1881; the Second Boer War was 1899–1902)
Who was assassinated by Hugh de Merville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitzhurse and Richard le Breton? Thomas Becket (also referred to as Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1118-70, murdered during the reign of Henry II, who later confessed to having incited the murder, asking to be rid of 'this turbulent priest'. Becket was canonized - St Thomas Becket - in 1173)
The original 'Wendy house' was built for which fictional character? Wendy Darling (in the play and novel Peter Pan, written by J M Barrie in 1904)
Convict Robert Franklin Stroud was better known as whom? The Birdman of Alcatraz (1890-1963, imprisoned for manslaughter in 1909, he killed a prison guard in 1916 and spent the rest of his life in prison, achieving fame for breeding and writing about canaries)
What scientist and inventor was responsible for the Decibel unit of measurement? Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922, inventor of the telephone in 1876 - incidentally, a decibel is one tenth of a bel)
Which city is known as Auld Reekie and also Athens of the North? Edinburgh
The French slang 'capote anglaise' meaning English hood, or English overcoat refers to what? A condom
Maris Piper is a variety of which vegetable? Potato
An epithalamium is a song or poem celebrating what? Marriage (or a wedding)
Which is the lightest element? Hydrogen
Dame Peggy Ashcroft won an Oscar for her role in which 1984 film? A Passage to India
In 1865 what significant event happened at Ford's Theatre in Washington DC? Abraham Lincoln's assassination (by John Wilkes Booth, who interestingly was at the time a successful actor, although not performing in the play Lincoln was watching, which was called Our American Cousin)
Who painted The Blue Boy in 1779? Thomas Gainsborough
Who wrote the poem Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard? Thomas Gray (1716-71, the 1751 poem features some of the most commonly quoted lines among all poerty, and originated some very famous expressions including 'far from the madding crowd', 'celestial fire' and 'kindred spirit')
Little Big Horn, the scene of Custer's last stand, is in which US state? Montana (25-26 June 1876)
Which year was the death penalty for murder abolished in Britain? 1965
What clash, in 1746, was the last major battle to be fought on mainland Britain? The Battle of Culloden (fought near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands, Culloden ended the Scottish Jacobite rising and preserved the British throne from the incumbent Hanoverian King George II)
Who was Britain's first Labour prime minister? Ramsey MacDonald (1866-1937, first term Jan-Nov 1924, followed by terms from 1929-31, and 1931-35 in charge of a new 'national' government in response to the 1931 financial crisis)
What does UNESCO stand for? United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization
quizballs 40 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

The Aconcagua is the highest peak in which mountain range? Andes (Aconcagua is 22,834 feet high, and is in Argentina)
What of these sports bodies was founded first, the AAA, FA, MCC or IOC? MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club, formed in 1787, is the governing body of world cricket. The Football Association was formed in 1863, Amateur Athletics Association in 1880, and the International Olympic Committee in 1894)
Who was president of the USSR from 1982-84? Yuri Andropov (1914-84, he died in office from various problems related to kidney failure. Andropov was preceded by Leonid Brezhnev and succeeded by Konstantin Chernenko, and can be credited for grooming the reforming Mikhail Gorbachev for leadership)
What was American silent film star 'Fatty' Arbuckle's first name? Roscoe
The character Roger 'Race' Bannon appeared as a boy's bodyguard in which cartoon series? Jonny Quest (the Hanna-Barbera action-adventure animation made from 1964-65 was one of the earliest targets for criticism about scenes of violence in children's TV programmes. Bonus points for knowing the name of Jonny's dog: Bandit)
Guru Nanak Dev founded which religion? Sikhism (the basis of the Sikh religion was established in the late 1400's by Guru Nanak, 1469-1539, formalised later in what became known as the Adi Granth, defining the three pillars of Sikhism; namely daily meditation and chanting, working productively and honestly, and sharing and giving)
The Phoenix Park murders of 1882 took place in which city? Dublin (Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke, the second and third most senior ministers in the British government of Ireland were victims of the Irish Invincibles, an Irish nationalist group)
Who designed the famous Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona? Gaudi (Antoni Gaudi i Cornet, 1852-1926 - work on Sagrada Familia started in 1884 and amazingly it is still being built)
Who was Henry VIII's third wife? Jane Seymour (1509-37, married 1536-7, mother of future Edward VI, but died 12 days after the birth - no doubt before Henry had a chance to find something wrong with her and have her executed..)
From which seeds is tahini made? Sesame (tahini is a paste used especially in Middle Eastern and Oriental savoury cuisine)
What is the human ailment epistaxis better known as? Nosebleed
The Kariba Dam is on which river? Zambezi (or Zambesi - it starts in Zambia and eventually reaches the Indian Ocean in Mozambique, passing over Victoria Falls along the way. The dam lies between Zambia and Zimbabwe who share its electrical output. Apparently four of the 87 men who died building it remain buried in the concrete)
What does the B stand for in Lyndon B Johnson? Baines (Lyndon B Johnson, 1908-73, also known as LBJ, 36th president of the USA, succeeded John F Kennedy in 1963, and held office until retirement in January 1969)
What item of attire is a leghorn? Hat (made of straw)
What does an oologist collect? Birds' eggs
The Neanderthal Museum is in which country? Germany (near Mettmann, in Western Germany between Dusseldorf and Wuppertal)
In which country is the European Court of Human Rights? France (in Strasbourg - the European Court of Human Rights has jurisdiction over the contracting nations of the Council of Europe, founded in 1949 to develop European democratic principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights. As at June 2007 there are 47 contracting nations)
In British history a Cavalier was a supporter of which king? Charles I (the royalist 'Cavaliers' fought the 'Roundheads' in the English Civil War 1642-51. The name Cavalier referred to the arrogant fashion and attitude associated with cavalry officers. Roundhead referred to the pudding-bowl hairstyles favoured by the anti-royalists which contrasted with the flamboyant long curls of their opponents. Just like the mods and the rockers..)
Leporine relates to which animal? Hare
In Greek mythology who was Apollo's twin sister? Artemis (Goddess of the Hunt and Wild, sometimes extending to the Moon too, daughter of Zeus, handy with a bow and arrow, and generally not the type of girl to mess around)
Assassinated in 1965, who was Malcolm Little better known as? Malcolm X (1925-65, American black nationalist leader, also known by his adopted Muslim name el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz)
What was the name of Ernest Shackleton's ship which became stuck in Antarctic ice in 1915? HMS Endurance
By what name was Dutch dancer Margarethe Zelle better known? Mata Hari (1876-1917, famous for her relationships with powerful men on both sides of the First World War, ending with her execution by the French, accused of spying for Germany, although doubts remain as to the reliability of the evidence and the conviction - her stage name Mata Hari is Indonesian for sun - literally 'eye of the day')
Which famous US lawman had brothers called Morgan and Virgil? Wyatt Earp (famed for his involvement in the 1881 Gunfight at the OK Corral, Tombstone, Arizona, when the Earps and Doc Holliday fought the Clantons and McLaurys)
What was the name of the cruise ship seized by hijackers in the Mediterranean in 1985? Achille Lauro
What type of creature is an amberjack? Fish (found and fished in warm coastal waters around the world)
In 1968 which US artist and film maker was shot and wounded by actress Valerie Solanas? Andy Warhol
Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body? Throat
What is the capital of Croatia? Zagreb (whoch loosely means grab, and possible relates grabbing or taking water)
What is the international distress signal one level below and less serious than a 'Mayday' call? Pan-pan (usually three times, and pronounced 'pawn-pawn' - the Morse code equivalent is TTT. The term is from the French word panne meaning breakdown. Incidentally Mayday - Morse equivalent SOS - is from French m'aider meaning help me, more fully explained in the expressions origins section. The French word sécurité - again usually announced three times - is the third level of emergency, typically used for maritime navigational or weather warnings)
Carambola is another name for which fruit? Star fruit (also known as a kamranga or coromandel gooseberry)
In 1902 the Treaty of Vereeniging brought which war to an end? The Second Boer War (there were two Boer Wars - the First Boer War was 1880–1881; the Second Boer War was 1899–1902)
Who was assassinated by Hugh de Merville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitzhurse and Richard le Breton? Thomas Becket (also referred to as Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1118-70, murdered during the reign of Henry II, who later confessed to having incited the murder, asking to be rid of 'this turbulent priest'. Becket was canonized - St Thomas Becket - in 1173)
The original 'Wendy house' was built for which fictional character? Wendy Darling (in the play and novel Peter Pan, written by J M Barrie in 1904)
Convict Robert Franklin Stroud was better known as whom? The Birdman of Alcatraz (1890-1963, imprisoned for manslaughter in 1909, he killed a prison guard in 1916 and spent the rest of his life in prison, achieving fame for breeding and writing about canaries)
What scientist and inventor was responsible for the Decibel unit of measurement? Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922, inventor of the telephone in 1876 - incidentally, a decibel is one tenth of a bel)
Which city is known as Auld Reekie and also Athens of the North? Edinburgh
The French slang 'capote anglaise' meaning English hood, or English overcoat refers to what? A condom
Maris Piper is a variety of which vegetable? Potato
An epithalamium is a song or poem celebrating what? Marriage (or a wedding)
Which is the lightest element? Hydrogen
Dame Peggy Ashcroft won an Oscar for her role in which 1984 film? A Passage to India
In 1865 what significant event happened at Ford's Theatre in Washington DC? Abraham Lincoln's assassination (by John Wilkes Booth, who interestingly was at the time a successful actor, although not performing in the play Lincoln was watching, which was called Our American Cousin)
Who painted The Blue Boy in 1779? Thomas Gainsborough
Who wrote the poem Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard? Thomas Gray (1716-71, the 1751 poem features some of the most commonly quoted lines among all poerty, and originated some very famous expressions including 'far from the madding crowd', 'celestial fire' and 'kindred spirit')
Little Big Horn, the scene of Custer's last stand, is in which US state? Montana (25-26 June 1876)
Which year was the death penalty for murder abolished in Britain? 1965
What clash, in 1746, was the last major battle to be fought on mainland Britain? The Battle of Culloden (fought near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands, Culloden ended the Scottish Jacobite rising and preserved the British throne from the incumbent Hanoverian King George II)
Who was Britain's first Labour prime minister? Ramsey MacDonald (1866-1937, first term Jan-Nov 1924, followed by terms from 1929-31, and 1931-35 in charge of a new 'national' government in response to the 1931 financial crisis)
What does UNESCO stand for? United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization
quizballs 40 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

The Aconcagua is the highest peak in which mountain range? Andes (Aconcagua is 22,834 feet high, and is in Argentina)
What of these sports bodies was founded first, the AAA, FA, MCC or IOC? MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club, formed in 1787, is the governing body of world cricket. The Football Association was formed in 1863, Amateur Athletics Association in 1880, and the International Olympic Committee in 1894)
Who was president of the USSR from 1982-84? Yuri Andropov (1914-84, he died in office from various problems related to kidney failure. Andropov was preceded by Leonid Brezhnev and succeeded by Konstantin Chernenko, and can be credited for grooming the reforming Mikhail Gorbachev for leadership)
What was American silent film star 'Fatty' Arbuckle's first name? Roscoe
The character Roger 'Race' Bannon appeared as a boy's bodyguard in which cartoon series? Jonny Quest (the Hanna-Barbera action-adventure animation made from 1964-65 was one of the earliest targets for criticism about scenes of violence in children's TV programmes. Bonus points for knowing the name of Jonny's dog: Bandit)
Guru Nanak Dev founded which religion? Sikhism (the basis of the Sikh religion was established in the late 1400's by Guru Nanak, 1469-1539, formalised later in what became known as the Adi Granth, defining the three pillars of Sikhism; namely daily meditation and chanting, working productively and honestly, and sharing and giving)
The Phoenix Park murders of 1882 took place in which city? Dublin (Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke, the second and third most senior ministers in the British government of Ireland were victims of the Irish Invincibles, an Irish nationalist group)
Who designed the famous Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona? Gaudi (Antoni Gaudi i Cornet, 1852-1926 - work on Sagrada Familia started in 1884 and amazingly it is still being built)
Who was Henry VIII's third wife? Jane Seymour (1509-37, married 1536-7, mother of future Edward VI, but died 12 days after the birth - no doubt before Henry had a chance to find something wrong with her and have her executed..)
From which seeds is tahini made? Sesame (tahini is a paste used especially in Middle Eastern and Oriental savoury cuisine)
What is the human ailment epistaxis better known as? Nosebleed
The Kariba Dam is on which river? Zambezi (or Zambesi - it starts in Zambia and eventually reaches the Indian Ocean in Mozambique, passing over Victoria Falls along the way. The dam lies between Zambia and Zimbabwe who share its electrical output. Apparently four of the 87 men who died building it remain buried in the concrete)
What does the B stand for in Lyndon B Johnson? Baines (Lyndon B Johnson, 1908-73, also known as LBJ, 36th president of the USA, succeeded John F Kennedy in 1963, and held office until retirement in January 1969)
What item of attire is a leghorn? Hat (made of straw)
What does an oologist collect? Birds' eggs
The Neanderthal Museum is in which country? Germany (near Mettmann, in Western Germany between Dusseldorf and Wuppertal)
In which country is the European Court of Human Rights? France (in Strasbourg - the European Court of Human Rights has jurisdiction over the contracting nations of the Council of Europe, founded in 1949 to develop European democratic principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights. As at June 2007 there are 47 contracting nations)
In British history a Cavalier was a supporter of which king? Charles I (the royalist 'Cavaliers' fought the 'Roundheads' in the English Civil War 1642-51. The name Cavalier referred to the arrogant fashion and attitude associated with cavalry officers. Roundhead referred to the pudding-bowl hairstyles favoured by the anti-royalists which contrasted with the flamboyant long curls of their opponents. Just like the mods and the rockers..)
Leporine relates to which animal? Hare
In Greek mythology who was Apollo's twin sister? Artemis (Goddess of the Hunt and Wild, sometimes extending to the Moon too, daughter of Zeus, handy with a bow and arrow, and generally not the type of girl to mess around)
Assassinated in 1965, who was Malcolm Little better known as? Malcolm X (1925-65, American black nationalist leader, also known by his adopted Muslim name el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz)
What was the name of Ernest Shackleton's ship which became stuck in Antarctic ice in 1915? HMS Endurance
By what name was Dutch dancer Margarethe Zelle better known? Mata Hari (1876-1917, famous for her relationships with powerful men on both sides of the First World War, ending with her execution by the French, accused of spying for Germany, although doubts remain as to the reliability of the evidence and the conviction - her stage name Mata Hari is Indonesian for sun - literally 'eye of the day')
Which famous US lawman had brothers called Morgan and Virgil? Wyatt Earp (famed for his involvement in the 1881 Gunfight at the OK Corral, Tombstone, Arizona, when the Earps and Doc Holliday fought the Clantons and McLaurys)
What was the name of the cruise ship seized by hijackers in the Mediterranean in 1985? Achille Lauro
What type of creature is an amberjack? Fish (found and fished in warm coastal waters around the world)
In 1968 which US artist and film maker was shot and wounded by actress Valerie Solanas? Andy Warhol
Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body? Throat
What is the capital of Croatia? Zagreb (whoch loosely means grab, and possible relates grabbing or taking water)
What is the international distress signal one level below and less serious than a 'Mayday' call? Pan-pan (usually three times, and pronounced 'pawn-pawn' - the Morse code equivalent is TTT. The term is from the French word panne meaning breakdown. Incidentally Mayday - Morse equivalent SOS - is from French m'aider meaning help me, more fully explained in the expressions origins section. The French word sécurité - again usually announced three times - is the third level of emergency, typically used for maritime navigational or weather warnings)
Carambola is another name for which fruit? Star fruit (also known as a kamranga or coromandel gooseberry)
In 1902 the Treaty of Vereeniging brought which war to an end? The Second Boer War (there were two Boer Wars - the First Boer War was 1880–1881; the Second Boer War was 1899–1902)
Who was assassinated by Hugh de Merville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitzhurse and Richard le Breton? Thomas Becket (also referred to as Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1118-70, murdered during the reign of Henry II, who later confessed to having incited the murder, asking to be rid of 'this turbulent priest'. Becket was canonized - St Thomas Becket - in 1173)
The original 'Wendy house' was built for which fictional character? Wendy Darling (in the play and novel Peter Pan, written by J M Barrie in 1904)
Convict Robert Franklin Stroud was better known as whom? The Birdman of Alcatraz (1890-1963, imprisoned for manslaughter in 1909, he killed a prison guard in 1916 and spent the rest of his life in prison, achieving fame for breeding and writing about canaries)
What scientist and inventor was responsible for the Decibel unit of measurement? Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922, inventor of the telephone in 1876 - incidentally, a decibel is one tenth of a bel)
Which city is known as Auld Reekie and also Athens of the North? Edinburgh
The French slang 'capote anglaise' meaning English hood, or English overcoat refers to what? A condom
Maris Piper is a variety of which vegetable? Potato
An epithalamium is a song or poem celebrating what? Marriage (or a wedding)
Which is the lightest element? Hydrogen
Dame Peggy Ashcroft won an Oscar for her role in which 1984 film? A Passage to India
In 1865 what significant event happened at Ford's Theatre in Washington DC? Abraham Lincoln's assassination (by John Wilkes Booth, who interestingly was at the time a successful actor, although not performing in the play Lincoln was watching, which was called Our American Cousin)
Who painted The Blue Boy in 1779? Thomas Gainsborough
Who wrote the poem Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard? Thomas Gray (1716-71, the 1751 poem features some of the most commonly quoted lines among all poerty, and originated some very famous expressions including 'far from the madding crowd', 'celestial fire' and 'kindred spirit')
Little Big Horn, the scene of Custer's last stand, is in which US state? Montana (25-26 June 1876)
Which year was the death penalty for murder abolished in Britain? 1965
What clash, in 1746, was the last major battle to be fought on mainland Britain? The Battle of Culloden (fought near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands, Culloden ended the Scottish Jacobite rising and preserved the British throne from the incumbent Hanoverian King George II)
Who was Britain's first Labour prime minister? Ramsey MacDonald (1866-1937, first term Jan-Nov 1924, followed by terms from 1929-31, and 1931-35 in charge of a new 'national' government in response to the 1931 financial crisis)
What does UNESCO stand for? United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization
quizballs 41 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

What Latin phrase means operational method, or the way a job is done? Modus Operandi (loosely translated as mode of operating)
In the human body which gland secretes the hormone insulin? Pancreas
The state of Nebraska was sold to the USA in 1803 by which country? France (as part of the Louisanna Purchase, which transfereed much of central North America to the US from France - for about $15m - so called because a main reason was to secure American access to the vital port of New Orleans in Lousianna)
Tala is the basic monetary unit of which country? Samoa (fully the Independent State of Samoa - the Tala is comprised of 100 Sene - and incidentally the words Tala and Sene are derived from dollar and cent.)
Carrageen is an edible variety of what? Seaweed (or algae)
Who composed the opera Turandot? Puccini (Giacomo Puccini)
Which English cathedral has 'The Clock with no Face'? Salisbury (apparently a clock-face was considered unnecesary because the time was announced by bells)
Who was the first woman to walk in space? Svetlana Savitskaya (of Russia, 25 July 1984, on Salyut 7)
Spiro Agnew was US vice-president to which president? Richard Nixon
In which European town is the Menin Gate Memorial to missing British and Commonwealth soldiers? Ypres (Flanders in Belgium, location of some of the worst fighting and heaviest losses of WW1)
The Lowell Observatory is in which US state? Arizona (in Flagstaff)
Who was the president of Chile from 1974-90? Augusto Pinochet
What is the world's smallest republic? Nauru (an eight-square-mile Pacific island 26 miles South of the equator, 2,500 miles from Australia - Nauru became independent in 1968 taking the smallest republic title from San Marino. Nauru was previously under trusteeship of the UN, jointly administered by Australia, New Zealand and the UK.)
Who played the prison warden in the 1979 film Escape from Alcatraz? Patrick McGoohan
Sounding like a placename, what is the traditional pronged spear used for catching Salmon called? Leister (pronounced 'lester')
Who succeeded Michael Foot as leader of the Labour Party in the UK? Neil Kinnock (in 1983)
Jazz musician Jelly Roll Morton played which instrument? Piano (real name Ferdinand Joseph Lamott Morton, 1885-1941, famous for Black Bottom Stomp among others)
Coopers Hill in Gloucestershire, England, is famous for which annual event? Cheese Rolling (or Cheese Rolling and Wake)
Which country had the Roman name Mauritania (also spelled Mauretania)? Morocco
The Laughing Cavalier is a work by which painter? Frans Hals (1580-1666 - he was Dutch)
What type of rock is carbonado? Diamond (also known as black diamond - carbonado's characteristics cause many to believe that they come from space or result from meteor impact)
What is limnophobia a fear of? Lakes (or big bodies of water)
Ribes Nigrum is the Latin name for which fruit? Blackcurrant
What type of animal is a Garron? Horse
In which US city was the 2006 Super Bowl held? Detroit (Michigan)
Which country (at July 2007) boasts the world's longest suspension bridge span between towers? Japan (opened in 1998, the Akashi-Kaikyo bridge, or Pearl Bridge, connects Akashi near Kobe to the island Awaji-shima - total length 3,990m with a centre span of 1,990m. The Great Belt Fixed Link Bridge in Denmark is much longer overall but its longest span is shorter than the Akashi-Kaikyo bridge at just over 1,660m.)
What does OAPEC (not OPEC) stand for? Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC stands for Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, whose membership obviously extends beyond the Arab nations. Essentially OPEC aims to manage oil pricing, whereas OAPEC focuses on oil and energy development among its member Arab nations.)
In which country was fashion designer Rifat Ozbek born? Turkey
What is the main ingredient of guacamole? Avocado (guacamole - a dip or relish - was originally made by the Aztecs of the Central Americas thosands of years ago. It contains mashed avocado, with various additions such as tomato, salt, lemon or lime, chilli peppers, and onion)
Which country has the international car registration DZ? Algeria
In which city is the United Nations headquarters? New York
In 1987 a French court found which Gestapo chief guilty of war crimes and sentenced him to life imprisonment? Klaus Barbie (he died four years later of leukemia, age 77)
Which famous US architect designed the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo in 1916? Frank Lloyd Wright (the hotel was demolished in 1968, the entrance lobby was saved, and reconstructed in the Meiji Mura museum in Nagoya)
Ichthyology is a branch of zoology concerning which creatures? Fish
W Somerset Maugham's novel The Moon and Sixpence is based on the life of which painter? Paul Gaugin
How many international caps did English footballer Stanley Matthews (later Sir Stanley Matthews) win? Fifty-four
Who became leader of the People's National Party in Jamaica in 1969? Michael Manley
What element is mixed with Iron to make cast iron? Carbon
Which type business traditionally has three balls hanging outside? Pawnbroker (or Pawnshop - the three balls can be traced back to the symbol associated with the Medici family, adopted the medieval bankers of Lombardy, who developed the pawnbroking system of money-lending to circumvent the religious constraints of the times. The word Lombard, aside from its modern 'backronym' interpretation, was the formal term for a pawnbroker banker in the late middle ages, hence Lombard Street in London and other financial centres)
What is the fictional Scottish island setting of the 1973 film The Wicker Man? Summerisle
Which famous Mormon church leader and educational pioneer died in Salt Lake City in 1877? Brigham Young
Which US actress's real name is Mary Cathleen Collins? Bo Derek
In which body of water are the Balearic Islands? Mediterranean Sea
Who was hanged in Edinburgh in 1829 for multiple murder in supplying doctors with corpses for dissection? William Burke (William Hare, his accomplice, saved himself by giving evidence against Burke)
Mariolatry is the idolatrous worship of whom? The Virgin Mary
Who said in a radio broadcast in 1939, "I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia" ? Winston Churchill
What is Zurich's main river? Limmat
What is the collective term for a group of woodpeckers? Descent
What is the name of the Cambridge University College that was originally for women only? Girton (boys were allowed in 1979)
Who was King of Egypt from 1936-52? Farouk (Farouk I, forced to abdicate in 1952, at which his son Faud II became briefly the last King of Egypt, reigning for less than a year, when the monarchy was brought to an end by the 1952 revolution, officially creating the Arab Republic of Egypt in 1953)
quizballs 42 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


Which horse won the Epsom Derby in 1989? Nashwan (owned by Hamdan bin Rashid Al Maktoum, ridden by Willie Carson, odds were 5/4, winning distance was five lengths)
What is the medical condition icterus commonly called? Jaundice (jaundice is a yellowing of the skin related variously to red blood cell break-down, liver function or bile processing)
What plant was traditionally cultivated in Europe for its unique blue dye? Woad (sometimes called 'Asp of Jerusalem', is was later replaced by indigo dye from the various indigofera plant varieties, among whose most common applications was the manufacture of denim jeans. Woad is a much older dye, dating back to 8,000 BC and perhaps even earlier)
What significant member of the British government drowned when HMS Hampshire was sunk by a mine off Orkney in 1916? Lord Kitchener (1850-1916, Secretary of State for War, noted for his finger pointing appearance on the famous and much imitated World War I recruitment poster)
Who discovered and opened Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922? Howard Carter (English archaeologist and Egyptologist, 1874-1939)
Who invented the jet engine? Frank Whittle (it was patented in 1930)
In which London building was the funeral of Diana Princess of Wales held in 1997? Westminster Abbey
Which Argentine leader was deposed in 1982? General Galtieri (fully, Leopoldo Fortunato Galtieri Castelli, 1926-2003)
Marron Glacé is what, preserved and coated in sugar? Chestnut
In which year was the Battle of Waterloo? 1815 (on 18 June, Wellington's defeat of Napoleon ended the Napoleonic Wars - Waterloo is in Belgium, close to Brussells)
Which actor's real name was William Henry Pratt? Boris Karloff (1887-1969 - he was actually born in Dulwich, London, and educated at Uppingham School in Rutland)
The creation of what famous and anthemic song is officially attributed to Banjo Paterson and Christina Macpherson? Waltzing Matilda
Who played Daisy Duke in the 2005 film The Dukes of Hazzard? Jessica Simpson (Catherine Bach played Daisy in the 1979-85 original TV show, and Waylon Jennings sang the TV theme song)
What name is given to the uncut locks of hair worn on the sides of the head by orthodox male Jews? Payess
In Greek mythology what is the name of the river whose water when drunk caused complete forgetfulness and made the souls of the dead forget their life on earth? Lethe (also referred to as the 'river of oblivion')
What are the little discs of waste called that are produced by a paper or card hole-punch? Chad (or chads)
What are the padded high-waisted trousers with shoulder straps worn for skiiing called? Salopettes
What type of natural substance is caoutchouc (pronounced kachook)? Rubber (or latex)
The first atomic bomb explosion was carried out in which US state? New Mexico (1945)
Whose last work entitled The Transfiguration was unfinished when he died in 1520? Rafael
What is the capital of Jordan? Amman
Which bird is generally considered to have the best sense of smell? Kiwi
Who was the second president of the USA? John Adams (president from 1797-1801)
Who wrote the Ballad of Reading Gaol in 1898? Oscar Wilde
The World Trade Organization was founded in 1995 in which European city? Geneva (replacing GATT - the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade established in 1947)
Brunswick, Lancastrian and Pearl Pickler are types of which vegetable? Onion
In numerology a tern is a set of how many? Three
Eamon de Valera founded which Irish political party in 1926? Fianna Fail (more precisely Fianna Fáil, the largest - as at 2007 - and most frequently governing party of Ireland - Fianna Fáil means literally 'soldiers of discovery' ? - clarification sought please)
Actor Frank Gorshin played which character in the 1960's TV series Batman? The Riddler
Pekoe is a type of which drink? Tea
Which station has the longest escalator in London's Tube network? Angel
Caprine relates to which animal? Goat
The Welland Ship Canal is in which country? Canada (connecting the lakes Ontario and Erie)
Who played Woody Allen's ex-wife in the 1979 film Manhattan? Meryl Streep
The 1957 song Butterfly was (surprisingly) the only UK number one hit achieved by which significant recording artist? Andy Williams
On what date is St Martin's Day - or Martinmas - celebrated in Europe? 11 November
What is a funambulist? Tightrope walker
Where on a woman's body would you see a bindi? Forehead (a bindi, or a pottu or tilak among other terms, is the name of the decorative mark or jewel on the forehead just above the eyebrows, worn typically by Hindu women, and increasingly now by other women and girls beyond traditional Hindu use. The forehead position relates to the sixth Chakra, which is significant in the traditional Eastern spiritual concept of the Chakras.)
From which European country does Limburger cheese originate? Belgium
England cricketer Denis Compton played for which county club? Middlesex (Compton, 1918-97, also played football for Arsenal and England, as did his twin brother Leslie - imagine the fuss that the tabloids would make of them now..)
Mount Godwin-Austen is better known by which name? K2 (second-highest mountain on Earth)
Who made the famous statement, 'I think, therefore I am' ? Rene Descartes (generally regarded as the father of modern philosophy, Descartes was born near Tours in France in 1596, and died from pneumonia in Stockholm in 1650 while tutoring Queen Christina of Sweden whose demanding schedules were said to have contributed to his exhaustion. 'I think, therefore I am' - Latin 'Cogito Ergo Sum', or French: 'Je pense donc je suis' - first appearded in his 'Discourse de la Méthode' published in 1637.)
Who composed the ballet music Swan Lake in 1877? Tchaikovsky (in full, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, 1840-93, among many great symphonies the Russian composer also wrote the ballets The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker - and in a letter to a friend also the inspirational quote, '..I have never felt such self-satisfaction, such pride, such happiness, as in the knowledge that I have created a good thing.')
The city of Bulawayo is in which African country? Zimbabwe (where in 2007, life-expectancy is presently just 37 years of age, which maybe puts our own worries into clearer perspective)
Henry Darnley was the husband of which British monarch? Mary Queen of Scots (it didn't last - Darnley, 1545-67, was blown up while recovering from smallpox, probably murdered by Mary and the Earl of Bothwell, whom she married shortly after Darnley's death)
Catherine de Medici was the wife of which French monarch? Henri II (Catherine, 1519-89, produced ten children for Henri, including the future King Francois II, who wed Mary Queen of Scots, before she married Darnley..)
In what state was Jimmy Carter governor before becoming president? Georgia
In which European city is the sixteenth century limestone Bridge of Sighs? Venice (the bridge is so named, apparently by poet Lord Byron in the 1800's, because it offered convicted prisoners their last view of the city before they entered prison)
In which film does Robert De Niro play the character Rupert Pupkin? The King of Comedy
The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing was founded in 1860 at which London institution? St Thomas' Hospital (the School is now based at King's College on the Thames South Bank in London and remains a centre of excellence for nursing and midwifery)
The person holding what office sits on the Woolsack in the House of Lords? The Lord Speaker (The Woolsack seat, originally stuffed with English wool, was introduced by King Edward III, 1327-77, as a symbol of England's wool trade and resulting prosperity. Today the Woolsack is stuffed with wool from the Commonwealth countries and symbolises unity. The Woolsack was the seat of the Lord Chancellor until 2006, when due to the creation of two separate roles - Lord Chancellor previously encompassed the Speaker role - it became the seat of the Lord Speaker.)
quizballs 43 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



Byssinosis is a disease affecting which part of the body? Lungs (Caused by prolonged inhalation of textile dust)
First performed in 1938, and commonly considered one of the saddest of all classical works, who composed Adagio for Strings (it was used in the 1986 film Platoon)? Samuel Barber
Which American animator created Daffy Duck and Droopy Dog? Tex Avery (Frederick Bean Avery)
What range of hills between Northumberland and the Scottish borders gave their name to a farm breed? Cheviot (sheep)
On April 1st 1957 the normally serious BBC TV news programme Panorama convinced thousands of English viewers that what type of food grew on trees? Spaghetti (The highly respected broadcaster Richard Dimbleby provided the voiceover, which was a major factor in achieving the hoax, aside from general ignorance among English people of the times about 'foreign food'.)
A spheksophobic fears which insects? Wasps
In 1992 which scientist and philosopher was absolved of heresy by the Vatican? Galileo (Galileo Galilei, 1564-1642 - Galileo's terrible crime against the church was stating in 1632 that the Earth orbited the Sun, rather than vice-versa.)
Who is the patron saint of Portugal? St George
Who composed Maple Leaf Rag? Scott Joplin (published 1899 - popular American ragtime pianist and composer Joplin also wrote 'The Entertainer', which became famous in more recent times as the theme music for the 1973 film The Sting)
How many pockets does a billiard table normally have? Six
In which US state was the American Declaration of Independence signed on 4th July 1776? Pennsylvania (in Philadelphia, in the Pennsylvania State House, subsequently renamed Independence Hall and now preserved as a world heritage site. The building was also the original location of the iconic Liberty Bell, which has since been relocated to the Liberty Bell Centre also in Philadelphia.)
Who in 1990 became the first chancellor of a united Germany? Helmut Kohl (he was succeeded in 1998 by Gerhard Schröder)
Which country was previously called Persia? Iran (fully the Islamic Republic of Iran)
Which car manufacturer has a model called the Favorit? Skoda
Who was the wing commander who led the 'Dambusters' bomber raids in 1943? Guy Gibson (Gibson was awarded the VC. He died in action in 1944.)
The Faroe Islands are an autonomous province of which country? Denmark (The Faroes, or Faeroes, comprising 18 islands in the North Atlantic between Iceland and Norway, derive their name from Nordic meaning sheep islands, although now virtually all industry and exports are fishing related. It is impossible to be further than 3 miles from the ocean anywhere on the Faroes.)
How old was Tony Blair when he became British prime minister in 1997? Forty-three (he was born on 6th May 1953, and became PM on 2nd May 1997, four days before his forty-fourth birthday)
The fashionable island Martha's Vineyard is in which US state? Massachusetts (Martha's Vineyard is notable for being one of the few US placenames containing a possessive apostrophe, and more notoriously for the 1969 drowning of Mary Jo Kopechne in Senator Edward Kennedy's car at Chappaquiddick, a smaller island connected to Martha's Vineyard.)
In Western culture what is the birthstone for the month of May? Emerald (Emerald is part of the beryl mineral family and has the chemical formula Be3Al2Si6O18)
Fotheringhay Castle, birthplace of Richard III in 1452, and site of Mary Queen of Scots trial and execution in 1587, is in which English county? Northamptonshire (Fotheringhay Castle, near Oundle, fell into ruin after Mary's execution, and only its mound remains.)
What was the oil tanker which ran aground on Bligh Reef in 1989, spilling crude oil into Prince William Sound, off the south coast of Alaska? Exxon Valdez (As at 2007 punitive damages are still being contested in the American courts. The ship was renamed Mediterranean after being repaired. Its original name is from the Alaskan port, Valdez.)
In 1844 Samuel Morse sent the first public telegraph message containing what short biblical quote (from the book of Numbers chapter 23, verse 23)? What hath God wrought?
Which American celebrity claims to have a maid called Vaginica Seaman? David Gest (Best known for his marriage and split with Liza Minnelli and subsequent gameshow TV appearances, Gest achieved his initial success as music producer.)
What is the capital of Queensland, Australia? Brisbane
In the Bible to whom did God give the Ten Commandments? Moses
What is the 1990's cult Japanese electronic toy which is cared for as if it were a pet? Tamagotchi (Literally 'small egg', and similar to the Japanese word tomodachi meaning friend.)
What is the number of the MASH unit in the TV series? 4077
In what year was suffragette Emily Davidson killed by King George V's horse in the Epsom Derby? 1913 (Emily Davidson died four days after the collision. The king's horse Anmer and jockey Herbert Jones both recovered from their injuries. Davidson's precise intentions are unknown - theories include intentional suicide, obstructing the horse, or less plausibly attaching a flag to the horse. Davidson was an first-class honours Oxford graduate and a passionate and creative campaigner for women's rights. One of her earlier and safer protests was that of hiding overnight in the House of Commons so that she could claim it to be her residence for the 1911 population census.)
What is Herman Munster's twin brother called? Charlie (Charlie Munster was played by Fred Gwynne, who not surprisingly also played Herman.)
What is the line called on a ship which is the limit to which it may be loaded? Plimsoll line (aka International load line - it was brought into force in 1876 by coal merchant and politician Samuel Plimsoll.)
quizballs 44 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



Astana is the capital of which country? Kazakhstan (Astana means 'capital city' in Kazakh)
Which playwright was once secretary to James Joyce, 1969 Nobel prizewinner for literature, and wrote his most famous play originally in French, titled En Attendant Godot? Samuel Beckett (1906-89)
Who is fifth in line to the British throne (as at Aug 2007)? Princess Beatrice
What is the Latin term used in referencing which means 'in the same place' ? Ib. (or 'Ibid.' from the full Latin word 'ibidem')
What is the flap which covers the human windpipe when swallowing? Epiglotis (derived from Greek epi meaning on, and glossa meaning tongue)
Born Henry John Deutschendorf Junior, which American singer died when his light aircraft crashed into the sea off California in 1997? John Denver (he took his name from the capital of Colorado, his favourite state)
James Earl Ray was arrested at Heathrow airport in 1968 and subsequently convicted of whose assassination? Martin Luther King
Who was the famous wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia? Lady Godiva (Leofric and Godiva were important figures in early 11th England, but Lady Godiva's naked ride on horseback through Coventry to persuade her husband to lower people's taxes is not historically reliable, and probably legend based on her conventional support of local religious causes)
Finishing in Paris after nearly 10,000 miles, from which city did racers begin the first long distance car rally in 1907? Peking (now Beijing)
The town of Fray Bentos, after which the meat products brand was named, is in what country? Uruguay (close to the border with Argentina, about 100 miles north of Buenos Aires - the original Fray Bentos was apparently a priest)
Cedi is the basic monetary unit of which African country? Ghana (Cedi = 100 pesewas)
Henry Sewell led the first government of which country in 1856? New Zealand (he held office as premier for just two weeks)
What, loosely translating as 'self-boiler', is a traditional metal Russian tea urn called? Samovar (derived from sam meaning self and varit meaning to boil, from Old Slavic variti meaning to cook)
Barack Obama's best selling book is called 'The Audacity of..' what? Hope
What was the name of the ship on which Charles Darwin set sail on his voyage around the world in 1831? HMS Beagle
Mary Mallon was effectively imprisoned for life in New York for being an irresponsible immune carrier of what disease? Typhoid (hence her nickname and the expression, 'Typhoid Mary', referring to someone whose behaviour creates a risk of infecting to others)
Graham Vivian Sutherland's official portrait of which prime minister was destroyed by the subject's wife because she hated it? Sir Winston Churchill (painted in 1954 and destroyed sometime after Churchill's death in 1965)
Who was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize? Marie Curie (1903 for Physics - she also won in 1911 for Chemistry)
Who wrote the best selling book The Tipping Point? Malcolm Gladwell (published in 2000, The Tipping Point sought to explain how small things could cause massive effects)
What is the name of the largest island of Japan? Honshu (more correctly Honshū, which means 'main state')
What does WAP stand for in mobile phone technology? Wireless Application Protocol (WAP hype prompted the alternatives: Wait And Pay, Worthless Application Protocol)
Harry Longbaugh was better known by what name? The Sundance Kid (partner of Butch Cassidy and member of the Wild Bunch outlaw gang in the late 19th century)
Which common chemical element has the atomic number 20? Calcium (Calcium is a silvery soft metal with the chemical symbol Ca)
BRN is the international vehicle registration for which country? Bahrain
For which film did Henry Fonda win his best actor Oscar? On Golden Pond
Which huge global communications brand is derived from a local word for a marten? Nokia (a marten is like a weasel - the variety in question was probably the pine marten or sable, which gave its name to the Finnish river and town on which the early Nokia company - a paper mill - was built.)
Who was the first reigning British monarch to make an official visit to the USA? George the Sixth (in 1939)
What is the name of the carnival held in some countries on Shrove Tuesday? Mardi Gras (literally 'Fat Tuesday', or technically 'Tuesday Fat')
Who was the British nurse arrested in Brussells and shot by firing squad in 1915 on suspicion of helping Allied solders to escape? Edith Cavell
What object officially joined our solar system on 1st May 1930? Pluto
quizballs 45 - free 'ABC quiz' - general knowledge questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
All answers are single-words and begin with A, B or C.

There are five A's, five B's and five C's.

There is a pattern, but what is the pattern?

And can you solve them all?

A surprise attack, and collective noun for group of tigers? Ambush
ACAS is the UK's Advisory, Conciliation and 'what' Service? Arbitration
A robot, from the Greek word for male? Android
Capital of the United Arab Emirates? Abu Dhabi
The letter denoting a link in HTML (webpage) code typically followed by 'href'? A
The word for the weight on the end of a pendulum? Bob
Maureen Lipman's onomatopaeic character name in BT's TV adverts? Beattie
Composer of the Eroica, Pastoral and Choral Symphonies? Beethoven
The initials BCC on a memo or email stand for a 'what' Carbon Copy? Blind
The meaning of B in the marketing abbreviation B2B? Business (to Business)
The British Queens to Georges II and IV, with respective titles of Ansbach and Brunswick? Caroline
Addictive product produced in a British factory first by Robert Gloag in 1856? Cigarettes
Tragically misunderstood daughter of Shakespeare's King Lear? Cordelia
Sri Lanka's previous name? Ceylon
The Spanish word for a hundred? Cien
quizballs 46 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Question 4 answer corrected 23 Oct 2007 - thankfully my major clanger was quickly spotted (pun intended) wrongly stating number of balls on a snooker table - not seventeen, of course, twenty-two - (Thanks M Ronneback)






With what is a 'carpetbag steak' stuffed? Oysters (Apparently popularised first in Sydney Australia in the 1950's. The word oyster derives from the ancient Greek word osteon meaning bone, the root also of words like osteopathy.)
In language a paronomasia is more commonly known as what? Pun (A word with two meanings, usually having a comic effect - like a 'double-entendre', which extends the pun principle to phrases where usually one of two meanings is rude.)
Which early Charles Dickens novel features the characters Wackford and Fanny Squeers, Smike, Newman Noggs and the Cheeryble brothers? Nicholas Nickleby (Fully, The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby. Dickens, 1812-70, first serialised the story between 1838-9 before it was published as a novel.)
How many balls, including the white cue ball, are on a snooker table (before any are potted)? Twenty-two (White, yellow, green, brown, blue, pink, black and fifteen reds.)
In Western ecclesiastical law a diriment impediment invalidates what? Marriage (or a wedding)
Who is generally credited with the invention of the hovercraft in 1955? Christopher Cockerell (Later Sir Christopher Cockerell. His prototype first crossed the English Channel in 1959. Earlier secret development of similar technology by the American military is possible but is obviously not easy to substantiate.)
What colour is the letter L in the standard Google logo? Green (The word googol was suggested for the number one followed by 100 zeroes, 10100, by American mathematician Edward Kasmer in 1940.)
How many stars are on the flag of the European Union? Twelve (The number of stars is constant and does not equate to the number of EU member countries. The design has been twelve gold stars on a blue background since the adoption of the flag in 1986, prior to which it had been in use by the Council of Europe, and originally in 1955 by the six member countries of the European Coal and Steel Community.)
Who wrote the poem beginning, "Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone.." which featured in the funeral scene of the film Four Weddings and a Funeral? W H Auden (Wystan Hugh Auden, 1907-73, born in England, became naturalised American in 1946. The poem is actually titled Funeral Blues.)
Tallinn is the capital of which country? Estonia (Estonia achieved independence of the Soviet Union in 1991, after the four year 'singing revolution' among the people of Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia, remarkable for its popular passive resistance and defiant hymn-singing.)
What colour is Stephanie's hair in the children's TV series LazyTown? Pink
Which English playwright and poet was stabbed in uncertain circumstances in 1593 age 29 (he penned the line 'Come live with me and be my love')? Christopher Marlowe
Who won 'The Battle of the Sexes' tennis match at the Houston Astrodome in 1973? Billie Jean King (King beat 1940's men's champion Bobby Riggs in three straight sets. The cleverly promoted event achieved unprecedented publicity for women's tennis and equal rights.)
Kenneth Kaunda was the first president of which African country? Zambia (Fully, the Republic of Zambia, and previously Northern Rhodesia. Kaunda, a leading figure in the Republic's formation, came to office in 1964, initially as the president of Northern Rhodesia, becoming Zambia later that year, and he presided until 1991.)
What is the common word for the monosaccharide substance found in certain fruit, flower nectar and honey, with the chemical formula C6H12O6? Fructose (From the Latin word fructus, meaning fruit.)
The cult TV series Lost which began in 2004 features 'Oceanic Flight ...' what? 815 (If anyone has the slightest idea what's going on please send me your suggestions..)
The billionnaire Barclay twins' long-running disputes about their private island Brecqhou (or Brechou) are with which Channel Island? Sark (Sark, 2 square miles, population around 600, no cars, is gradually revising its old feudal constitution in line with modern European laws, while trying to preserve its ancient heritage. In 1993 the Barclay twins bought Brecqhou island, historically a tenement of Sark. A prolonged clash of ideals ensued. Sark sought to maintain certain jurisdictions over Brecqhou, while the twins sought to protect and enhance their investment, with a spawling new castle and multi-million pound lawsuits against Sark in the European courts. I suppose we should pity the poor Barclay twins - paying all that money for their own island and then can't get on with the neighbours..)
Which Scottish athlete refused to run on a Sunday at the 1924 Paris Olympic Games? Eric Liddle (Liddle, 1902-45, withdrew from the 100 metres before the games when the schedule was first announced. He trained instead for the 400 metres, which he won in a world record time. He also won bronze in the 200 metres.)
What does K stand for in the CMYK colour model used in printing? Key (Usually black, so called from the key printing plate, used to outline or contrast in the images created with the other colours: cyan - blue, magenta - pinkish red, and yellow.)
The King and Queen of which European country narrowly escaped assassination on their wedding day in 1906? Spain (King Alfonso VIII and Queen Consort Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg - granddaughter of British Queen Victoria.)
Marsh Fever is another term for which ailment? Malaria (which according to the World Health Organization kills about a million people every year, mostly children, despite the existence of preventative treatment and cure.)
What is the offspring of a male lion and a tigress called (apart from very dangerous)? Liger (A liger is the largest of all cats, apparently living in a constant state of pubescent growth due to its mixed genetics, with examples reported in excess of 500kgs; a tigon incidentally is the offspring of a lionness and a male tiger.)
Jazz musician Miles Davis, 1926-91, whose 1959 album Kind of Blue is generally regarded as the biggest selling jazz album of all time, played what instrument? Trumpet
What is the capital of Sierra Leone? Freetown (The West African port city is so named because it was an early settlement of freed slaves, first established in the late 1700's.)
What is the (traditionally wooden) housing or stand which contains a ship's compass? Binnacle (ultimately derived from Latin habitare, meaning to dwell, in which the T sound evolved to an N sound while the word transferred through French to English.)

quizballs 47 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


The river Han flows through which capital city? Seoul (South Korea, or the Republic of Korea)
Who was the president of Yugoslavia, 1953-80? Tito (Josip Broz Tito, 1892-1980)
James Mason played Sir Randolph Nettleby which 1984 film? The Shooting Party
The St Leger is run at which English racecourse? Doncaster (first run in 1776, named after Major General Anthony St Leger, MP and racing man, who proposed the idea of the new race)
Which popular Welsh entertainer wrote the First World War song Keep the Home Fires Burning? Ivor Novello (1893-1951)
What is the largest island in the Mediterranean? Sicily
Yellowstone National Park is in which US state? Wyoming (the first area to be designated a national park in the USA, in 1872)
Who became the chairman of Watford Football Club in 1977? Elton John
Jenards Likely Lad of Lardhams was better known as which famous animal? The Dulux Dog (the original Old English Sheepdog used in the Dulux paint adverts)
What is the fourth book of the Bible's Old Testament? Numbers
Who played Elliot Ness in the 1987 film The Untouchables? Kevin Costner
What did a cordwainer make? Shoes
What number of equal size circles (or coins) fit exactly around another of the same size so that all are touching? Six
The Merciless Parliament convicted of treason the entire court of which British monarch? Richard the Second (in 1388)
A Pearmain is what type of fruit? Apple
Which British boxer and past world middleweight champion committed suicide in his flat in Leamington Spa in 1966? Randolph Turpin
Who was the last King of Iraq? Faisal the Second (1935-58 - he reigned from 1939 until his death)
Where was the first British Grand Prix motor race held? Brooklands (1926)
What was Lily Munster's maiden name? Dracula
What is the main ingredient of the dish Borscht? Beetroot
What is the US state capital of Virginia? Richmond
A salpingectomy is the surgical removal of which part of the body? Fallopian tubes
What does private health insurance BUPA stand for? British United Provident Association (founded in 1947)
What is the generally accepted collective term for a group of starlings? Murmuration
In which year was the Channel Tunnel (between England and France) opened? 1994
What was the name of Napoleon's horse at Waterloo? Marengo
A 2007 film celebrated the 50th anniversary of which typeface? Helvetica
If something is bicephalous it has two what? Heads
Which famous fashion emporium was started by Barbara Hulanicki in London in 1964? Biba
Who wrote the ballet The Firebird? Igor Stravinsky (1910)
quizballs 48 - free christmas quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



Who was the first British monarch to broadcast a Christmas message to the nation? George the Fifth (in 1932)
Child star Jimmy Boyd sang which hugely popular 1950's Christmas song, which was initially banned by the Catholic Church in Boston because it supposedly mixed sex and Christmas? I saw Mommy kissing Santa Claus
Who banned Christmas in England between 1647 and 1660? Oliver Cromwell
On which date is Epiphany celebrated in the traditional Western calendar? 6th January
Who are the four ghosts in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol? Christmas Past, Christmas Present, Christmas Yet to Come, and Jacob Marley (one point for each correctly named ghost, and a bonus point for all four)
What liqueur goes into making a 'snowball' cocktail? Advocaat (or advokatt, pronounced 'advocar' - normally a blend of brandy, egg yolks, vanilla and sometimes other ingredients - award yourself a bonus point if you dare order one next time you go to the bar.)
What is the English title of the carol written in 1818 by Austrian priest Josef Mohr originally called Stille Nacht? Silent Night
The Nordic countries (Denmark, Sweden, Norway notably) tend to celebrate Christmas chiefly on which date? 24th December
Which US state in 1907 was the last to declare Christmas a legal holiday? Oklahoma
Presepe in Italy refers to what Christmas tradition? Nativity scene (literally meaning crib)
Christmas Crackers is cockney rhyming slang for which part of the male anatomy? Testicles (see knacker origins - related to the very old word for a horse slaughterer.)
What is the popular name for little baked sausages wrapped in rashers of streaky bacon? Pigs in blankets
Which of the Wise Men was said to have brought the gift of gold for the baby Jesus? Melchior
The 1954 movie White Christmas was the first to be made using what new Paramount film format? VistaVision
Which river did George Washington cross on Christmas night in 1776 in the American Revolutionary War? Delaware
What changed in 1752 which caused Britain to have a White Christmas less frequently thereafter? The calendar (the adoption of the Gregorian calendar, replacing the Julian calendar, shifted Christmas day back 12 days - and all the other days too of course - 11 days were skipped in 1752 and a further day in 1800.)
Traditional in Germany at Christmas, what sort of food is stollen? Cake
According to the UK National Meteorological Office what year (prior to 2007) was the last White Christmas in Britain? 2004
The Christmas period of 1813-14 saw the last what in London? Christmas Fair on a frozen River Thames (known as a Frost Fair)
How many gifts are given in total in the song The Twelve Days of Christmas? 364
The words "Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume breathes of life, of gathering gloom..." come from which Christmas carol? We Three Kings of Orient Are (composed by Rev John Henry Hopkins, 1857)
Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean is a territory of which country? Australia
Which diarist noted on 25th December 1662, "(Christmas Day). Had a pleasant walk to White Hall, where I intended to have received the communion with the family, but I have come too late..." Samuel Pepys (pronounced 'peeps')
The USA's official National Christmas Tree is in which National Park? King's Canyon National Park, California (a giant sequoia called The General Grant)
John Callcott Horsley designed what first commercial Christmas item in 1843? Christmas card
In Victorian England what people were popularly called robins because of their red uniforms? Postmen
Which popular poem was alternatively known as A Visit from St Nicholas? 'Twas The Night before Christmas ('Twas the night Before Christmas' is also the first line. The poem was first published anonymously in 1823 and is commonly attributed to Clement Clarke Moore, although some believe Henry Livingston was the true author. This different to the song Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Rudolph was created in 1939 by copywriter Robert May for the Montgomery Ward department store chain in a free Christmas promotional story. This extended the 1823 poem and was later still developed into the Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer song.)
Which token vegetable is often included in the ingredients of a Christmas pudding? Carrot (vegetables were in earlier times used in making Christmas puddings)
What animal is Snowball in George Orwell's book Animal Farm? A pig
Yorkshireman William Strickland is believed to have brought the first what to Britain from North America in 1526? Turkey
quizballs 49 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes




What is a bicycle called with seats and pedals for two riders, one behind the other? Tandem
A marmoset is what type of animal? Monkey
What is the name of the popular Japanese alcoholic drink made from rice? Sake (pronounced 'sarkey')
What colour are the berries from the rowan tree? Red (Also known as the montain ash, the rowan is a member of the rose plant family, which includes cherries, apples and quinces.)
Who made the Gettysburg Address in 1863? Abraham Lincoln
Who played Don Vito Corleone in the 1972 film The Godfather? Marlon Brando
How many yards are in a furlong? 220
Which musician, who died in 1987, famously had a candelabra on his piano? Liberace
Which country has the international car registration letter A? Austria
Who is sixth in line to the British throne (as at December 2007)? Princess Eugenie (fully Princess Eugenie of York - Prince Andrew's daughter - the order at Dec 2007 is: Charles, William, Harry, Andrew, Beatrice, Eugenie, Edward, Edward's children, then Anne, and Anne's children.)
What is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet? Delta
Chinese gooseberry is another name for which fruit? Kiwifruit
Glaucoma affects which part of the human body? Eyes
How many points does a conversion score in rugby union? Two
The resort of Faliraki is on which Greek island? Rhodes
Eric Cartman is a character in which cartoon series? South Park
Who became Lord Mayor of London in 1397? Richard Whittington (or Dick Whittington)
In motoring what does BHP stand for? Brake Horse Power
A book about someone's life written by someone else is called what? Biography
What is the name of cartoon character Dora the Explorer's monkey? Boots
What is the capital of Canada? Ottawa
In which sport would you see a Boston Crab? Wrestling
A 'pea-souper' is which type of weather condition? Fog
What is a maker of casks and barrels called? Cooper
Who was the original host of BBC TV's Have I Got News For You? Angus Deayton
During the US 1920s prohibition what was the name given to an illegal drinking place? Speakeasy
Singer and musician Gordon Sumner is better known by what name? Sting
What type of foodtsuff is marscarpone? Cheese (a cream cheese from Italy)
What does IQ stand for? Intelligence Quotient
What is a two-dimensional geometric shape with five equal straight sides and five equal angles called? Pentagon
quizballs 50 - free general knowledge 2007 quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes




Which past leader of Russia died in April 2007? Boris Yeltsin
Which 2007 convicted celebrity drunkard is nicknamed Lilo? Lindsay Lohan
What month in 2007 was the smoking ban in England introduced? July (1st)
Who was the heroic baggage handler at the attempted Glasgow airport car-bombing? John Smeaton
Who suggested that Gordon Brown had transformed from Stalin to Mr Bean? Vince Cable (temporary leader of the Liberal Democrats after Menzies Campbell's departure)
In Chinese astrology, 2007 was the year of the what animal? Pig (or boar)
Representatives of which army drew huge crowds at the British Museum when first appearing in September 2007? The Terracotta Army (a dozen figures were loaned from the thousand which make up the full Chinese collection)
Who suspended the constitution in Pakistan in November 2007? President Musharraf (President Pervez Musharraf)
Which country won the 2007 Eurovision Song Contest? Serbia (with the song Moltiva - meaning 'prayer' - sung by Marija Serifovic)
Which psychiatrist and host of BBC Radio 4's In the Psychiatrist's Chair died in October 2007? Anthony Clare
Who became the 2007 Formula One World Driver's Champion in October? Kimi Raikkonen (properly Kimi-Matias Räikkönen, of Finland)
Who was the BBC reporter kidnapped in the Gaza Strip and later released in July 2007? Alan Johnson
Donald Tusk replaced a twin to become prime minister of which country? Poland (Jaroslaw Kaczynski was the previous PM - his identical twin Lech Kaczynski remained president as at the end of 2007)
Which zoot-suited jazz musician died in July 2007? George Melly
Cristina Kirchner became the first elected woman president of which country? Argentina (she is properly called Cristina Elisabet Fernández de Kirchner)
Who became respectively First and Second Ministers of the 2007 power-sharing Northern Irish Assembly? Ian Paisley and Martin McGuinness
What was Paris Hilton's offence for which she was sentenced to 45 days in prison? Driving while banned
In what Sudan city was Gillian Gibbons imprisoned for the blasphemous naming of a teddy bear incident? Khartoum
What was the Blue Peter cat name voted by viewers but substituted by the production staff because it was not considered 'suitable'? Cookie (Cookie was felt unsuitable because of possible slang interpretations and maybe mischievous voting arising from this.)
The iPhone was launched by which company? Apple
What month in 2007 did Tony Blair depart as UK prime minister? June (27th)
The fifth Harry Potter film released in July 2007 is called what? Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Name the England soccer manager sacked by the FA in November 2007? Steve McLaren (or fully Stephen McLaren)
Which severely injured soldier defied his negligible survival chances and featured strongly in the 2007 campaign to improve compensation for seriously wounded armed forces personnel? Ben Parkinson
Which England rugby player was controversially denied a try in the 2007 World Cup final against South Africa because his foot was deemed to have been in touch before grounding the ball? Mark Cueto
What was increased to 18 on 1st October 2007 in England and Wales? Legal age for purchasing tobacco
Adam Applegarth presided over what controversial corporation? Northern Rock
What video game was banned in 2007 for its "...unremitting bleakness and callousness..." ? Manhunt 2
What two countries joined the European Union on 1st January 2007? Romania and Bulgaria
Who was appointed new England soccer manager in December 2007? Fabio Capello
Who won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his environmental work including the controversial film An Inconvenient Truth? Al Gore (fully Albert Arnold 'Al' Gore, Jr.)
What city hosted the 2007 World Athletics Championships? Osaka (Japan - the US came top of the medal table, followed by Kenya, Russia and Ethiopia)
Niklas Zennstrom and Janus Friis, previous founders of Kazaa and Skype, launched their new video and TV show distribution website in October 2007 called what? Joost.com
Which country's victory at Wembley in November 2007 put the home nation out of the European Cup? Croatia (they won 3-2)
Faye Turney became famous as a member of which of the services? Royal Navy (She was the only woman sailor among the patrol group from HMS Cornwall which was captured by Iran in the Gulf.)
Who made the highly critical documentry film Sicko, about the US healthcare system? Michael Moore
Which former politician and convicted perjurer was appointed in November 2007 to lead a prison reform task force for the Conservative Party? Jonathan Aitken
Whose video called 'Falling Down' was banned on TV? Duran Duran
Which company was found officially responsible for the Suffolk Bird Flu outbreak in February 2007? Bernard Matthews
On which Indonesian island was the United Nations Climate Change Conference held in December 2007? Bali
What Cumbrian town was used as a 2007 pilot for the digital TV switch-over? Whitehaven
It was announced in April 2007 that Lord Justice Scott Baker would replace Baroness Butler-Sloss in what position? Coroner at the inquests into the deaths of Princess Diana and Dodi Al Fayed
What remarkable sale price did Damien Hirst's diamond-encrusted skull achieve? £50m
Which world champion 400m runner successfully overturned her Olympic Games ban for missing drug tests? Christine Ohuruogu
Monks featured strongly in the September protests in which country? Burma
Which northern England city was flooded by torrential rain on on 25 June 2007? Hull (fully Kingston upon Hull)
In what US city did Barack Obama announce his presidential candidacy in February 2007? Springfield (Illinois state capital)
Which Bollywood actor was at the centre of the 2007 Big Brother TV Show racism uproar? Shilpa Shetty
Shinzo Abe resigned in September 2007 as prime minister of which country? Japan (he was succeeded by Yasuo Fukuda)
Which corporation bought 1.6% of Facebook for $240m? Microsoft
The Kate Moss Collection was launched by what store chain? Top Shop
The two CDs lost by the UK department HMRC (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs) contained personal details of 20m people relating to claims of what? Child Benefit
Who resigned as England cricket coach after the 2007 Ashes series 5-0 defeat? Duncan Fletcher
What nickname was used by the media for the senior policeman in charge of the Cash for Honours investigation? Yates of the Yard (correctly, Assistant Commissioner John Yates)
In May 2007 Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum announced the biggest what in history to date? Charitable donation ($10bn for Middle East education)
Intensive British forces operations in Afghanistan through 2007 were centred in which province? Helmand
In what significant UK location was the August 2007 Climate Change Camp sited? Heathrow Airport
Which movie star left the much publicized 'rude pig' phone message for his twelve year old daughter? Alec Baldwin
In a bizarre 2007 confessional frenzy, Ruth Kelly, Jacqui Smith, Harriet Harman, Hazel Blears and Alistair Darling where among several British government ministers to make what admission? Using cannabis
At the end of 2007 how many England Premiership football (soccer) clubs were foreign owned? Nine (Manchester Utd, Man City, Liverpool, Chelsea, Aston Villa, Fulham, Portsmouth, West Ham and Sunderland.)
In June 2007 the Millennium Dome re-opened under what name? O2 (or to be precise, O2)
Which famous aviator and adventurer went missing over the Nevada Desert in September 2007? Steve Fosset (fully James Stephen Fossett)
The perfume brand 'Mwah' was launched in 2007 by which 'celebrity'? Channelle Hayes (UK 2007 Big Brother contestant)
What country celebrated on August 15th 2007 its 60th anniversary of independence from British rule? India
Who resigned as World Bank President after failing to disprove allegations of his nepotism? Paul Wolfowitz (arranged a big pay rise and promotion for his partner and World Bank employee Shaha Riza)
Which country won the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup? Germany (becoming the first nation to retain the title, with a 2-0 final victory over Brazil)
Following an Ofcom investigation which TV company was judged in September 2007 to be the worst offending in the premium line phone-in scandals? GMTV (Good Morning Television Ltd - 75% owned by ITV, and 25% owned by Walt Disney Co., as at 2007.)
What film won the 2007 Academy Award for Best Picture? The Departed (directed by Martin Scorsese)
Speculation towards the end of 2007 suggested that Rupert Murdoch's News International Group was in discussion to buy what significant business networking website? Linkedin.com
Which rapper cancelled his UK tour when refused entry to the country? Snoop Dog
What was the name of the Space Shuttle which launched on June 8th 2007? Atlantis (its five sister Space Shuttle craft are/were Enterprise, used for testing only, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery and Endeavour - interestingly not the US spelling 'endeavor' because the craft was named after the English explorer James Cook's ship HMS Endeavour. Challenger was lost shortly after launch in 1986; Columbia was lost on re-entry in 2003.)
Who made this amusing statement: "I have expressed a degree of regret that may be equated with an apology..." ? Des Browne (UK Defence Minister, after conveniently allowing the distracting purchase and publication by the press of stories from British sailors captured and held by Iran)
Whose secret donations of over half a million pounds caused a big problem for the Labour Party when they were exposed in November 2007? David Abrahams
Who became the new French president in 2007? Nicolas Sarkozy
Who was charged with fraud when he reappeared five years after going missing in a canoe off the Cleveland coast? John Darwin
Clarence Mitchell was appointed media spokesman for whom in September 2007? Gerry and Kate McCann (parents of missing Madeleine McCann)
Which Formula One racing team was expelled from the 2007 Constructors Championship for spying on a competitor? McLaren
Blake Fielder-Civil achieved notoriety as whose errant husband? Amy Winehouse
Which former newspaper owner and business mogul was sentenced to 78 months imprisonment for fraud in December 2007? Conrad Black
Which major city switched off its lights for an hour on the evening of 31 March 2007 as a political statement about climate change? Sydney (not the capital of Australia as many think, which is Canberra)
What was the village and laboratory site name connected with the August 2007 foot-and-mouth desease outbreak near Guildford in Surrey? Pirbright
Garments of which famous clothes label were found being made by child labour in India in October 2007? Gap (Gap Kids, more precisely)
Which organization announced euphemistically it would 'transition' its modestly performing '360' social networking website? Yahoo
What Richard Dawkins' book attracted huge popularity and controversy throughout 2007? The God Delusion
In 2007 according to World Health Organization statistics what are the only two non-African countries with an under-five infant mortality rate of more than 10%? Iraq and Afghanistan
quizballs 51 - free baby boomer music quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Question 19 was amended from 'Bill Haley's ... what' to 'Bill Haley and his ... what' - thanks A Cooper - 12 Apr 2008.
Question 55 was amended to 'Canadian-born' from 'American' (he later became naturalised American) - thanks B Cork - 29 Jul 2008




The live album Beauty and the Beat featured pianist George Shearring and which singer? Peggy Lee
Whose band was the Tijuana Brass? Herb Alpert
Who were Cliff Richard's backing group through the 60s? The Shadows
Who were the famous backing singers on most of Elvis Presley's early hits? The Jordanaires
The Stratocaster is a model of which guitar maker? Fender
Which piano-playing singer's first hit was The Fat Man? Fats Domino
Which American rock'n'roll star caused controversy when he married a young teenager? Jerry Lee Lewis
Who made the highly rated 1959 jazz album Kind of Blue? Miles Davis
Which iconic British female singer made the highly regarded album titled '(her first name) in Memphis' ? Dusty Springfield
Whose band was the All Stars? Junior Walker (Jr Walker)
Larry Adler played what instrument? Harmonica
Whose childhood hit was Fingertips? Stevie Wonder
Which guitar innovator and player has a range of Gibson Guitars named after him? Les Paul
The founding brother members of the Kinks were Ray and Dave what? Davies
What was Smokey Robinson's most famous band called? The Miracles
Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen's 1962 hit was called March of the ... what? Siamese Children
Who sang the hit theme song Rawhide? Frankie Laine
John Mayall's band which helped launch Eric Clapton's career was called what? Bluesbreakers
Rock Around the Clock was a hit for Bill Haley and his ... what? Comets
Which comedy actor had a novelty hit with My Boomerang Won't Come Back? Charlie Drake
Who sang with Serge Gainsbourg on the hit Je t'aime? Jane Birkin
Colin Blunstone fronted which 1960s group? The Zombies
What Eastenders star sang on the novelty hit Come Outside? Wendy Richard
Jiles Perry (JP) Richardson Jr, who died in the same plane crash as Ritchie Valens and Buddy Holly was better known by what name? Big Bopper
Which later-to-be-famous solo singer and guitarist toured as a member of the Beach Boys in the mid 60s? Glen Campbell
Who had sang the hit song Little Old Wine Drinker Me? Dean Martin
What famous 'two-fingered' jazz guitarist died in 1953? Django Reinhardt (Jean-Baptiste Reinhardt)
What song, released to promote the film The Millionairess, featured its stars Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren? Goodness Gracious Me
Who managed the Beatles' prior to his early death in 1967? Brian Epstein
Whose nickname was a derived from the term satchel-mouth? Louis Armstrong (Satchmo)
What's the name of the motorbiker who dies in the Shangri-Las' hit The Leader of the Pack? Jimmy
Which singing-songwriting founder of the Flying Burrito Brothers died age 26, after which his body was 'stolen' by a friend and burnt in the Joshua Tree National Park? Gram Parsons
Which American singer and entertainer was nicknamed Schnozzola, because of his large nose? Jimmy Durante
Who wrote and had a hit with the instrumental Classical Gas? Mason Williams
Who wrote Patsy Cline's hit Crazy? Willie Nelson
What city hosted the Beatles as the resident band at the Kaiserkeller and Top Ten Club? Hamburg
The Isley Brothers' hit was called Behind a ... what? Painted Smile
1950-60s record turntables commonly offered four speeds: 33, 45, 78, and what other? 16
American DJ Robert Weston Smith was better known by what stage name? Wolfman Jack
What ridiculously titled song was a hit in 1954 for Max Bygraves in the UK and the Four Lads in the USA? Gilly Gilly Ossenfeffer Katzenellen Bogen by the Sea
Who had the 1965 instrumental hit Spanish Flea? Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass
What was Emile Ford and the Checkmates' 1959 hit, supposedly the longest ever question in a UK No1 song title? What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For?
Who singer-guitarist's backing band was The Bruvvers? Joe Brown
Which Rolling Stones guitarist died in a swimming pool in 1969? Brian Jones
Who founded the Tamla Motown record label? Berry Gordy
What folksy British singer-songwriting guitarist was famous also for his whistling? Roger Whittaker
What was Hugo Montenegro's instrumental hit, composed by Ennio Morricone for the film of the same name? The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Tom Parker managed which huge star? Elvis Presley
Who won (barefoot) the British Eurovision Song Contest in 1967 with Puppet on String? Sandie Shaw
The 1956 inaugural Eurovision Song Contest featured Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Italy and which other country? Switzerland
Who originally fronted (and currently, 2008, still fronts) Herman's Hermits? Peter Noone
Which jazz singer, whose career actually spanned the 1930s-90s, was known as the First Lady of Song? Ella Fitzgerald
Which singer played Alfie's girlfriend Siddie in the 1966 film? Millicent Martin
What name was given to the 1950-60s mainstream country music style of artists including Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette, Jim Reeves, and Charlie Rich? Nashville Sound
What Canadian-born teen idol of the 1950s-60s wrote the lyrics to Sinatra's song My Way? Paul Anka
Which harmonica-paying frontman of Manfred Man sang on their early hits and later became a successful radio presenter? Paul Jones
Which motor city was the original the base of Tamla Motown? Detroit
What group became famous in the 1960s for their parody impressions of other hit songs? The Barron Knights
Peter Potter in the USA and David Jacobs in the UK presented which pop music TV show? Juke Box Jury
What was the 1962 space-age instrumental hit by the Tornados? Telstar
Who wrote and sang the novelty hit Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh, about Camp Granada? Allan Sherman
Who was the famous rock guitarist in the group Love Sculpture, notably featuring on their breakneck hit version of Khachaturian's classical piece Sabre Dance? Dave Edmunds
Rolf Harris endorsed what new musical instrument, which supposedly features on David Bowie's hit Space Oddity? Stylophone
Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Junior were among several entertainers given what collective nickname? The Rat Pack
Who originated the 'Wall of Sound' record production technique? Phil Spector
The Rolling Stones first record label was what? Decca
Simon and Garfunkel's song Mrs Robinson featured in what 1967 film? The Graduate
What American DJ was nicknamed Moondog? Alan Freed
What was Stephane Grappelli's instrument? Violin
Which gravel-voiced English singer was previously a gas-fitter from Sheffield? Joe Cocker
Who made the 1962 hit Monster Mash? Bobby 'Boris' Pickett (and the Cryptkickers)
Who sang the title song of the film The Girl Can't Help It? Little Richard
What was Gary Glitter's earlier stage name in the 1960s? Paul Raven
Lulu sang the theme song to which 1967 film about an inner-city school, starring Sidney Poitier? To Sir, With Love
What Eddie Cochran song, covered by the Who, told of frustrations with his boss and his congressman? Summertime Blues
Who was the main singing star in the musical Half a Sixpence? Tommy Steele
Which comedian's recordings featured hilarious telephone routines about King Kong and the introduction of Tobacco? Bob Newhart
What long-running BBC Radio chart show began on the Light Programme in 1955, and later becoming hugely popular when presented by Alan Freeman? Pick of the Pops
The Crickets backed which famous singer-songwriter? Buddy Holly
Dizzy Gillespie played what instrument? Trumpet
Who made the novelty song Jake the Peg? Rolf Harris
Which 1960s British rock'n'roll star founded the Official Monster Raving Loony Party? Screaming Lord Sutch (David Sutch, or fully 'Screaming Lord Sutch, 3rd Earl of Harrow')
Who was nicknamed 'The Big O'? Roy Orbison
Which member of the Hollies went on to join the hugely successful American band commonly known by their initials CSNY? Graham Nash
What record label did the Beatles establish? Apple
Who had a 1960s hit with Step Inside Love? Cilla Black
The record label and music company name HMV stood for what? His Master's Voice
Who sang the theme song to the film Born Free? Matt Monro
Congratulations was Cliff Richard's Eurovision Song Contest entry in what year? 1968
Which singer's Eurovision Song Contest entry was Knock Knock (Who's There?)? Mary Hopkin
Whose big hit was I love You Because? Jim Reeves
Who wrote the instrumental A Swingin' Safari and led the orchestra which played the original hit version? Bert Kaempfert
The Copacabana nightclub was in which city? New York
Which British comedian had the massive-selling 1965 hit Tears? Ken Dodd
Who sang the 1964 hit My Boy Lollipop? Millie (or Millie Small)
Cher's partner was Sonny ... who? Bono
Who made the hit comedy version of the Banana Boat Song, and other similar spoofs including versions of Presley's Heartbreak Hotel and Johnnie Ray's Cry? Stan Freberg
Which 1960s easy-listening Irish crooner was famed for his rocking chair and knitted jumpers? Val Doonican
What was Chuck Berry's first hit record? Maybellene
What number gives its name to the cultish 'club' celebrating rock stars who died at that age? 27 (The 27 Club)
quizballs 52 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes





Which fruit is the cordial grenadine primarily made from? Pomegranates
What type of musical instrument is a goombay? Drum
What is the US state capital of Vermont? Montpelier
Blepharitis is the medical term for the inflamation of which part of the body? Eyelid
The 2003 film Lost in Translation is set in which city? Tokyo
Who discovered the Victoria Falls in 1855? David Livingstone
Ailurophobia is a fear of what? Cats
Who wrote the novel The Cider House Rules? John Irving
In golf what is the name of a score of one stroke over par for a hole? Bogey
Who invented the centigrade thermometer in 1742? Anders Celsius
What does DVD commonly now stand for? Digital Versatile Disc (formerly Digital Video Disc)
What is the name of the casino on the reservation of the Mashantucket Pequot tribe in Connecticut? Foxwoods (as at May 2008 the biggest in the world)
Artist and musician Chris Sievey is better known as whom? Frank Sidebottom
Glen Moy and Autumn Bliss are varieties of which fruit? Raspberry
Exodus, the second book of the Bible, recounts the departure of the Israelites from which country? Egypt
What was the nationality of Lazlo Josef Biro, inventor of the ballpoint pen? Hungarian
Which singer held a gladiolus in his first appearance on BBC TV's Top of the Pops in 1983? Morrissey (with The Smiths)
Which US spacecraft was launched from Cape Kennedy in October 1968? Apollo Seven
Which British singer's real name is Thomas Woodward? Tom Jones
Sinclair Lewis was the first American to win a Nobel Prize for what subject? Literature (1930)
What is the legislative assembly of Spain called? Cortes (fully Cortes Generales)
Who painted The Rake's Progress? William Hogarth
A pelisse is what type of garment? Cloak
Which English Queen was executed on 19 May 1536? Anne Boleyn
A boyar was a member of the aristocracy in which country? Russia (next in rank below a prince)
What are the five events of the modern pentathlon? Fencing, shooting, swimming riding and cross-country running.
The Taj Mahal is on the bank of which river? Jumna
In which year was British Summertime first introduced? 1916 (during the First World War, and later made permanent in 1925 by House of Commons vote)
What was the pseudonym of French dramatist Jean-Baptiste Poqueline? Moliere (1622-73)
On which city were the 1912 Summer Olympic Games held? Stockholm

quizballs 53 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes





What connects Elizabeth Fry, Sir John Houblon, Adam Smith, George Stephenson, and Sir Edward Elgar? Appeared on Bank of England banknotes
The radioactive isotope Americium 241 (symbol: 241Am) is a common component in what household item? Smoke detector (or smoke alarm)
Which murderer lived at 39 Hilldrop Crescent, Kentish Town, North London? Dr Crippen (Hawley Harvey Crippen, executed in 1910 - the case was notable for the use of radio in catching the fleeing suspect, and pathology in convicting him)
What is the prehistoric fish considered extinct until found living off the African coast in the 20th century? Coelocanth
What is a fife: a type of kilt, a flute-like instrument, a helmet, or a lunchbox? A flute-like instrument
What did Manchester United footballer Carlos Tevez put in his mouth in celebrating a goal at Christmas 2007? A baby's dummy (a message to his family in Buenos Aires)
What water birds and their cries are associated with madness? Loons
Gorgonzola cheese is from which country? Italy
The wood sorrel plant is more commonly known as what? Shamrock
Put these Earth time periods and rock systems in order, oldest first: Triassic, Jurassic, Cambrian, Devonian. Cambrian, Devonian , Triassic, Jurassic.
What was Pamela Anderson's character in the TV series Baywatch? C J Parker
The gerbil is native to which two continents? Africa and Asia
What sea bird has the Latin name Corvus Marinus? Cormorant (it means 'sea crow')
What fruity four-letter acronym is used to identify the traditional main foreign (non-English) languages of the European market? FIGS (French, Italian, German, Spanish)
The eaves of a roof are what: its projecting edge, its guttering, its ridge tiles, or its water-resistance rating? The projecting edge
In what continent is Patagonia? South America (Southern tip, in Chile and Argentina)
What company started as 'Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web'? Yahoo
What size engine was Barry Sheene's Suzuki on which he won the 1976 and 1977 World Motorbike Championships? 500cc
What item of apparel is a homburg? A hat (typically a man's felt hat)
Where on a horse are its withers: front legs, rear legs, belly or back? Back (between shoulders)
What is the most popular paid-for UK tourist attraction (as at 2008, based on the number of paying visitors per year)? The London Eye (or Millennium Wheel - over 3½ million visitors per year)
A howdah is used in transporting people by what animal: dog, elephant, reindeer or dolphin? Elephant (it's a chair on an elephant's back)
Meniscus refers to what quality of the surface of a liquid: close to freezing, curved, smelly, or oily? Curved
What literary character's horse was Rosinante (also spelled Rocinante and Rozinante)? Don Quixote
What business name was said to be an acronym based on the claim that the founder 'entertains our nation'? Odeon (founded by Oscar Deutsch - Odeon is probably based simply on the Greek word odeum - a building for song performances, from the same Greek root oide, as is derived the word ode - a lyrical poem)
What is the word for maze taken from Greek legend? Labyrinth
What is the height of bullseye to the floor of a standard dart board in feet and inches? 5' 8" - five feet eight inches (apparently based on eye level for a six foot tall person)
What does PVC (the plastic) stand for? Polyvinyl chloride
What is a word puzzle comprising a picture or symbol plus individual letter or letters - and also the name of a UK TV detective? Rebus
What word in English is the definite article? The
quizballs 54 - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
With thanks to quiz compilers Barry Wilkinson and Malcolm Taylor for their contributions to this quiz.





In which French city are the headquarters of Interpol (as at 2008)? Lyon
What piece of sports equipment conforms to these dimensions: overall length 10.95cm; length of barrel 5.40cm; longer spigot 3.49cm; shorter spigot 2.06cm? Cricket bail (Two bails rest on top of the stumps.)
'Weight in kilograms divided by height in metres squared' equates to what health indicator? Body mass index
In which century did Cleopatra VII (lover of Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony) rule Egypt? First century BC (69-30BC)
What is the capital of Bahrain? Manama
In the Bible who was Noah's grandfather? Methuselah (He is also the notable for allegedly having fathered Noah's own father Lamech at the age of 187, and for living to the ripe old age of 969, which beats Adam's impressive innings of 930, making Methuselah the oldest person mentioned in the Bible.)
What is the word for the upright shadow-casting part of a sundial? Gnomon (from the same Greek word, meaning indicator, from gignosko, meaning know.)
Ireland's first ever all weather horse race meeting took place on 26 August 2007 on which racecourse? Dundalk (First race was won by Ms Victoria, ridden by Johnny Murtagh, at 14/1. Dundalk is also Ireland's first floodlit course and combined horseracing and greyhound racing facility.)
Who was the leader of the Trojans in the Trojan war? Hector
What gemstone is The Moonstone in the classic novel of that name by Wilkie Collins? Diamond (a priceless Indian diamond given to Rachel Verrinder on her eighteenth birthday and stolen the same night.)
In which US state were the Salem witch trials held? Massachusetts
What metallic element typically makes up between 10% and 25% of stainless steel? Chromium
What Cape is Great Britain's most North Westerly point? Cape Wrath (Sutherland county, Scotland. HMS Caribbean sank there on September 27th 1915. Cape Cornwall, in Cornwall is Britain's only other Cape. The name cape is typically given to a headland with the ocean on three sides. The name Wrath actually derives from Norse meaning 'turning point', because ships would turn there to follow the coast.)
Who was the prolific writer of theme music for 1960s TV shows including Steptoe and Son, Dr Who, The Prisoner, Dangerman and Tales of the Unexpected? Ron Grainer
Which 1999 film, starring John Cusack and Cameron Diaz, is about Craig, a puppeteer, who discovers a doorway that leads into the head of a movie star? Being John Malkovich
Which cricket commentator, who mistakenly called Monty Panesar 'Monty Python', was awarded an OBE in 2003? Henry Blofeld (Blofeld's father Tom is said to have been the inspiration for the naming of fictional James Bond villian Ernst Stavro Blofeld - the one with the white cat - created by Ian Fleming. Fleming and Tom Blofeld were at Eton school together.)
Apia is the capital of which independent island nation in the South Pacific? Samoa (Samoa gained independence from New Zealand on January 1st 1962.)
Nob Hill is an affluent area in which city in the United States? San Francisco
Which American female soul singer made the 1996 hit song Un-break My Heart? Toni Braxton
Name London Zoo's Giant Panda from 1958 until her death in 1972? Chi Chi (Two unsuccessful attempts were made to mate her with An An from Moscow Zoo, the two being, at that time, the only Giant Pandas in captivity in the West.)
Who became president of Egypt following the assassination of Anwar El Sadat in 1981? Hosni Mubarak (fully Muhammad Hosni Mubarak)
Of which 19th century movement were William Lovett and Feargus O'Connor leading figures? Chartism (Chartism was a movement for political and social reform in the UK from 1838-1848. Its name was taken from the People's Charter of 1838.)
What creature was introduced into MSN's logo on 14 February 2000? Butterfly
What international standard paper size (denoted by the letter A plus a number) has the dimensions of 297 x 420mm? A3 (The international ISO 216 paper size system, used by most of the world aside from USA and Canada, is based on the German DIN 476 standard. It is based on a sheet A0, measuring 841 × 1189mm equating to 1m2. Each size down is half of the area of the one above, as if folded widthways, so that A1 is half the area - and weight, of a given gauge - of A0, A2 is half of A1, A3 is half of A2, and so on to a dinky A10 at just 26 x 73 mm, which perhaps tiny pixies and fairies use.)
What was the original use of the building which now houses the Tate Modern art museum in London? Power station (Called Bankside Power Staion, designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who also designed Battersea Power Station, most of Liverpool Cathedral, and Britain's famous red telephone boxes.)
How many farthings were in a British guinea? 1,008 (21 shillings to a guinea, twelve old pennies to a shilling, and four farthings to a penny. See the British money history page.)
What does the internet abbreviation URL stand for? Uniform Resource Locator
Libraries, schools, writing, the wheel, the aqueduct and alcoholic beer are inventions generally credited to which country? Iraq (or Mesopotamia, as was)
Who played female agent Cinnamon Carter in the 1960s TV series Mission Impossible? Barbara Bain
What was the name of shark-hunter Quint's boat in the novel and film Jaws? Orca
quizballs 55 - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



As at 2008 which corporation owns the brands Duracell, Braun and Gillette? Procter & Gamble
Who was the first artist to appear at the new Wembley Stadium? George Michael (9 June 2007)
In which year did the first Mersey road tunnel open? 1934 (Liverpool to Birkenhead)
In which country was Imry Nagy twice Prime Minister, executed for treason in 1958 and reburied as a hero in 1989? Hungary (In Hungary his name would be Nagy Imre - he was executed after his country's failed 1956 uprising against the Soviets and reburied as a hero over 30 years later when Hungary became free of Soviet rule.)
Which English artist and engraver is famed for his paintings of horses? George Stubbs (1724-1806)
American jazz musician Art Tatum excelled on which instrument? Piano
What is the technical term for a solid figure with five plane (flat) faces? Pentahedron
A boomslang is what type of creature? Snake
What is grandpa's name in the TV show The Munsters? Sam Dracula (fully Sam Dracula, Count of Transylvania)
In which country was Greenpeace founded? Canada (in 1971)
Who succeeded James Callaghan as leader of Britain's Labour Party? Michael Foot (leader from 1980-83)
Which student of Socrates, and teacher of Aristole, wrote Republic? Plato
What is the name of the assembly of cardinals for the election of a pope? Conclave
Chiromancy is the technical name for what pseudoscience (claimed but not proven to be scientific)? Palmistry (or palm-reading - 'chiro' derives from Greek 'kheir' meaning hand.)
The Karnak Temple complex, dating back to the ancient city of Thebes, is in which country? Egypt
As at 2008 what is the most popularly attended concert venue in the world (highest audience numbers per year)? The O2, London (or 02 Arena, formerly the Millennium Dome, in Greenwich, London. The O2 corporation owns the name rights to the venue. They have also renamed Dublin's Point Theatre the same (O2), and perhaps others besides in the future, hence 'O2 London' is the most accurate answer.)
Nanga Parbat, meaning 'naked mountain', the 9th highest in the world, is part of which mountain range? Himalayas
In which year was the United Nations founded? 1945 (October 24th)
Which American singer's real name was Eunice Wayman? Nina Simone
The ghost of great Dane dog Kabur, said to haunt Los Angeles Pet Cemetery, belonged to which 1920s screen idol? Rudolph Valentino (fully Rodolpho Alphonso Guglielmi di Valentina d'Antonguolia, 1895-1926)
Who wrote Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance? Robert Pirsig (fully Robert M Pirsig, born 1928 - and the book's full title is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values. It was published in 1974.)
What country hosts the World Wife-Carrying Championships? Finland (traditionally in the town of Sonkajärvi, the race is run over a 253.5m track including various surfaces and obstacles, carrying a woman weighing or handicapped to weigh no less than 49 kgs, which also is the weight in beer of the prize for winning.)
What country temporarily renamed its currency Bolivar Fuerte (meaning strong Bolivar) while phasing out the use of the previous Bolivar alongside it? Venezuela (1BsF = 1000Bs. The Bolivar takes its name from Simon Bolivar, the of South American independence leader.)
What vital mechanism did Elisha Otis invent in 1852? The elevator brake (specifically a safety brake which stops the elevator from falling in event of cable failure, which dramatically increased confidence and installation of elevators in buildings.)
What is Earl's band called in the TV series My Name is Earl? Van Hickey
Which British MP claims responsibility for introducing speed bumps ('sleeping policemen') to UK roads? Kenneth Clarke (apparently he also claims jokingly to have influenced the Russian linesman to award Geoff Hurst's crucial second goal in the 1966 World Cup Final by shouting from his seat nearby in the crowd.)
Who holds the record for the longest televised successful golf putt (as at 2008)? Terry Wogan (33 yards, at Gleaneagles, in a 1981 BBC pro-celebrity golf event.)
Harrisburg is the capital of which US state? Pennsylvania
What are the Italian cheese balls whose name translates as 'small mouthfuls? Bocconcini
What did Colonel Thomas Blood attempt to steal in 1671? The Crown Jewels (from the Tower of London - Blood was captured while making his getaway, but then, puzzlingly, completely pardoned by the King.)
quizballs 56 - free bookworm quiz - literary questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



What word, extended from a more popular term, refers to a fictional book of between 20,000 and 50,000 words? Novella
Who wrote the famous 1855 poem The Charge of the Light Brigade? Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809-92)
In 1960 the UK publishing ban was lifted on what 1928 book? Lady Chatterley's Lover (by D H Lawrence)
In bookmaking how many times would an quarto sheet be folded? Twice (to create four leaves)
Who wrote the seminal 1936 self-help book How to Win Friends and Influence People? Dale Carnegie
Who in 1450 invented movable type, thus revolutionising printing? Johannes Gutenberg
Which Polish-born naturalised British novelist's real surname was Korzeniowski? Joseph Conrad (1857-1924, full name Jozef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski)
Which short-lived dramatist is regarded as the first great exponent of blank verse? Christopher Marlowe (1564-93 - Blank verse traditionally is unrhymed, comprising ten syllables per line, stressing every second syllable.)
Who wrote the maxim 'Cogito, ergo sum' (I think, therefore I am)? René Descartes (1596-1650, French philosopher and mathematician, in his work Discours de la Méthode, 1637.)
Who was the youngest of the three Brontë writing sisters? Anne Brontë (1820-49 - other sisters were Emily, 1818-48, and Charlotte, 1816-55, plus a brother, Branwell, 1817-48. The two oldest sisters, Maria and Elizabeth died in childhood.)
What is the Old English heroic poem, surviving in a single copy dated around the year 1000, featuring its eponymous 6th century warrior from Geatland in Sweden? Beowulf
What relatively modern school of philosophy, popular in literature since the mid 1900s, broadly embodies the notion of individual freedom of choice within a disorded and inexplicable universe? Existentialism
What was the pen-name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson? Lewis Carroll (1832-98)
Who wrote Dr Zhivago? Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (1890-1960)
What term and type of comedy is derived from the French word for stuffing? Farce or farcical (from the French farcir, to stuff, based on analogy between stuffing in cookery and the insertion of frivolous material into medieval plays.)
What term originally meaning 'storehouse' referred, and still refers, to a periodical of various content and imaginative writing? Magazine
Who wrote the significant scientific book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687? Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
What 16th century establishment in London's Bread Street was a notable writers' haunt? The Mermaid Tavern
Who wrote the 1845 poem The Pied Piper of Hamelin? Robert Browning (1812-89)
Which American poet and humanist wrote and continually revised a collection of poems called Leaves of Grass? Walt Whitman (1819-92 - the title is apparently a self-effacing pun, since grass was publishing slang for work of little value, and leaves are pages.)
The period between 1450 and 1600 in European development is known by what term, initially used by Italian scholars to express the rediscovery of ancient Roman and Greek culture? The Renaissance (literally meaning rebirth)
What is the main dog character called in Norton Juster's 1961 popular children's/adult-crossover book The Phantom Tollbooth? Tock
Who detailed his experiences before and during World War I in Memoirs of a Foxhunting Man, and Memoirs of an Infantry Officer? Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967)
What significant law relating to literary and artistic works was first introduced in 1709? Copyright (prior to which creators had no legal means of protecting their work from being published or exploited by others)
Who wrote the 1891 book Also Sprach Zarathustra (Thus Spake Zarathustra)? Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)
What word, meaning 'measure' in Greek, refers to the rhythm of a line of verse? Metre (or meter)
Cheap literature of the 16-18th centuries was known as 'what' books, based on the old word for the travelling traders who sold them? Chapbooks (a chapman was a travelling salesman, from the earlier term cheapman)
What was Samuel Langhorne Clemens' pen-name? Mark Twain (1835-1910)
Derived from Greek meaning summit or finishing touch, what word refers to the publisher's logo and historically the publisher's details at the end of the book? Colophon
Japanese three-line verses called Haiku contain how many syllables? Seventeen
Stanley Kubrick successfully requested the UK ban of his own film based on what Anthony Burgess book? A Clockwork Orange
The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) code was increased to how many digits from 1 January 2007? Thirteen
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis asserts that people's perceptions and attitudes are affected particularly by what: book covers, book price, or words and language? Words and language (the theory applies to all media and language, in that the type of words and language read and used affects how people react to the world)
What is the female term equating to a phallic symbol? Yonic symbol
James Carker is a villain in which Charles Dickens novel? Dombey and Son (serialised 1846-8)
What famous 1818 novel had the sub-title 'The Modern Prometheus'? Frankenstein (by Mary Shelley)
Who wrote the 1947 book The Fountainhead? Ayn Rand
By what name is the writer François-Marie Arouet (1694-1778) better known? Voltaire
Which pioneering American poet and story-teller wrote The Fall of the House of Usher? Edgar Allen Poe (1809-49)
According to Matthew 27 in the Bible what prisoner was released by Pontius Pilate instead of Jesus? Barabbas
What was the 1920s arts group centred around Leonard and Virginia Woolf and the district of London which provided the group's name? The Bloomsbury Group
What Japanese term (meaning 'fold' and 'book') refers to a book construction made using concertina fold, with writing/printing on one side of the paper? Orihon
What were the respective family names of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet? Montague and Capulet
Who wrote The Power of Positive Thinking in 1953? Norman Vincent Peale
Around 100AD what type of book construction began to replace scrolls? Codex (a series of folios sewn together)
What name for a lyrical work, typically 50-200 lines long, which from the Greek word for song? Ode
Who wrote the 1866 book Crime and Punishment? Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-81)
Who wrote the 1513 guide to leadership (titled in English) The Prince? Niccolo Machiavelli
William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey are commonly referred to as the 'what' Poets? Lake Poets (from around 1800 they lived close to each other in the Lake District of England)
In bookmaking, a sheet folded three times is called by what name? Octavo (creating eight leaves)
What is the parrot's name in Enid Blyton's 'Adventure' series of books? Kiki
Who wrote The French Lieutenant's Woman? John Fowles (1969)
What word, which in Greek means 'with' or 'after', prefixes many literary and language terms to denote something in a different position? Meta
"Reader, I married him," appears in the conclusion of what novel? Jane Eyre (by Charlotte Bronte, 1847)
Philosopher and writer Jeremy Bentham, 1748-1832, is associated with what school of thought? Utilitarianism (broadly Utilitarianism argues that society should be organised to produce the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people)
What influential American philosopher and author wrote the book 'Walden, or Life in the Woods'? Henry David Thoreau (1817-62)
The ancient Greek concept of the 'three unities' advocated that a literary work should use a single plotline, single location, and what other single aspect? Time (or real time)
Which statesman won the 1953 Nobel Prize for Literature? Sir Winston Churchill
Who is the second oldest of the Pevensie children in C S Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe? Susan (bonus points: Peter is the oldest, Edmund is third and Lucy is youngest. The lion is Aslan. The first edition was published in 1950.)
Who wrote the plays Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard? Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904)
What technical word is given usually to the left-side even-numbered page of a book? Verso
Which two writers fought a huge unsuccessful legal action in 2006-7 claiming that Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code had plaguarised their work? Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh
What is the pen-name of novelist Mary Ann Evans (1819-80)? George Eliot
What technical word is given usually to the right-side odd-numbered page of a book? Recto
In what decade was the Oxford English Dictionary first published? 1920s (1928)
What simple term, alternatively called Anglo-Saxon, refers to the English language which was used from the 5th century Germanic invasions, until (loosely) its fusion with Norman-French around 12-13th centuries? Old English
Who wrote Brighton Rock (1938) and Our Man in Havana (1958)? Graham Greene
Laurens van der Post's prisoner of war experiences, described in his books The Seed and the Sower (1963) and The Night of the New Moon (1970) inspired what film? Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
With which troubled son are parents Laius and Jocasta associated? Oedipus (The mythical Greek character unknowingly killed his father King Laius and married his mother Jocasta. Sigmund Freud's term Oedipus Complex refers to similar feelings supposedly arising in male infant development.)
Which Russian writer was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1970? Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (1918-2008)
The book Eunoia, by Christian Bok, suggests in its title, and features exclusively what, in turn, in its first five chapters? The vowels a, e, i, o, u. (Each chapter contains words using only one vowel type. Bok says Eunoia means 'beautiful thinking'. Eunioa is otherwise a medical term based on the Greek meaning 'well mind'.)
Which great thinker collaborated with Sigmund Freud to write the 1933 book Why War? Albert Einstein
Legal action by J K Rowling and Warner Brothers commenced in 2007 against which company for its plans to publish a Harry Potter Lexicon? RDR Books
Who wrote the 1939 book The Big Sleep? Raymond Chandler
"In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice which I've been turning over in my mind ever since," is the start of which novel? The Great Gatsby (F Scott Fitzgerald, 1925)
In the early 1900s a thriller was instead more commonly referred to as what sort of book? Shocker (or shilling shocker)
Who wrote the books Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame? Victor Hugo
In what decade were ISBN numbers introduced to the UK? 1960s (1966)
In 1969, P H Newby's book Something to Answer For was the first winner of what prize? Booker Prize (the Man Booker Prize from 2002)
Who established Britain's first printing press in 1476? William Caxton
The word 'book' is suggested by some etymologists to derive from the ancient practice of writing on tablets made of what wood? Beech (Boc was an Old English word for beech wood)
What is the name of the first digital library founded by Michael Hart in 1971? Project Gutenberg
French writer Sully Prudhomme was the first winner of what prize in 1901? Nobel Prize for Literature
Who wrote Naked Lunch, (also titled The Naked Lunch)? William Burroughs (1959)
In Shakespeare's King Lear, which two daughters benefit initially from their father's rejection of the third daughter Cordelia? Goneril and Regan
What was Christopher Latham Scholes' significant invention of 1868? Typewriter
Which novel begins "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife..."? Pride and Prejudice (by Jane Austen, 1813)
Japanese author and playwrite Yukio Mishima committed what extreme act in 1970 while campaigning for Japan to restore its nationalistic principles? Suicide
Which American philosopher, and often-quoted advocate of individualism, published essays on Self-Reliance, Love, Heroism, Character and Manners in his Collections of 1841 and 1844? Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-82)
Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye, printed in Bruges around 1475 is regarded as the first book to have been what? Printed in the English language (Caxton later printed Canterbury Tales in Westminster in 1476, which is regarded as the first book printed in the English language in England.)
In what city does Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace begin? Saint Petersburg (Petrograd and Leningrad are recent alternative and now obsolete names of this city - the quizmaster/mistress can decide if these answers are correct..)
Which French writer declined the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1964? Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980 - apparently he declined because he had an aversion to being 'institutionalised', although the real facts of the matter are elusive.)
What controversial novel begins: "[a person's name], light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, My soul," ? Lolita (by Vladimir Nabokov, 1955)
Jonathan Harker's Journal and Dr Seward's Diary feature in what famous 1897 novel? Dracula (by Bram Stoker)
What is the technical name for a fourteen-lined poem in rhymed iambic pentameters? Sonnet
"Make then laugh; make them cry; make them wait..." was a personal maxim of which novelist? Charles Dickens
What is the land of giants called in Gulliver's Travels? Brobdingnag
What prolific and highly regarded American author, who became a British subject a year before his death, wrote The Wings of the Dove; Washington Square, and the Golden Bowl? Henry James (1843-1916)
What term for a short, usually witty, poem or saying derives from the Greek words 'write' and 'on'? Epigram (epi = on, grapheine = write, which evolved into Latin and French to the modern English word)
What was the original title of the book on which the film Schindler's List was based? Schindler's Ark (by Thomas Keneally, which won the 1982 Booker Prize)
quizballs 57 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes




Who was the first prime minister of Israel? David Ben-Gurion
Who was the first man to appear on the cover of the American Vogue? Richard Gere (1992)
A gooney bird is another name for which bird? Albatross
Who directed the 2005 Bob Dylan documentary No Direction Home? Martin Scorsese
What is the US state capital of Washington? Olympia
Salpingitis is the medical term for the inflammation of which part of the body? Fallopian Tubes
Who (at 2008) plays Doctor Gregory House in the TV series House? Hugh Laurie
The Butut is the monetary unit of which country? Gambia (100 Bututs = 1 Dalasi)
Chrometophobia is an irrational fear of what? Money
Who won the 1987 British Formula One Grand Prix? Nigel Mansell
What type of creature is a bonnethead? Shark
The first chamber of commerce in Britain was founded in which city in 1783? Glasgow
Which country hosts the world screaming championships? Poland
In astronomy what is the outermost region of a planet's atmosphere called? Exosphere
A bibliophile is a lover of what? Books
In which year did Captain Scott reach the South Pole? 1912
Which British sportsman's autobiography is entitled Walking Tall? Peter Crouch (at 6'7" the tallest player footballer to represent England, with notable club spells at Liverpool and Portsmouth)
George Williams founded what in London in 1844? YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association)
Which novelist wrote under the pseudonym Ellis Bell? Emily Bronte
Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn played an architect and waitress in which 1992 film? Housesitter
A costard is what type of fruit? Apple
What is a corrida? Bullfight
Which British rock band leased a six-acre section of Shepperton Studios in 1977 under the name of Ramport Enterprises? The Who (the area served as office space, warehousing and rehearsals stages, and apparently hosted Keith Moon's last performance with The Who at a private fan club gig in 1978)
Who painted The Monarch of the Glen? Sir Edwin Henry Landseer
In which year was Britain's first adhesive postage stamp the Penny Black issued? 1840
In US politics who replaced Spiro Agnew as Richard Nixon's vice-president in 1973? Gerald Ford
What does TGV most commonly stand for? Train à Grande Vitesse (French: high speed train)
Who was crowned King of the Scots in 1306? Robert the Bruce
The term 'green-eyed monster' originated from which of Shakepseare's plays? Othello
The Royal Mint is in which country of the UK? Wales

quizballs 58 - 2008 year quiz - free general knowledge quiz questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes




Which missing adventurer's wrecked aircraft and bodily remains were found in California in October 2008? Steve Fossett
Who resigned as Ireland's Taoiseach (pronounced 'teeshock' - it is the head of government) in May 2008 after more than ten years in the position? Bertie Ahern (Patrick Bartholomew 'Bertie' Ahern)
In 2008 billionaire financier Carl Icahn joined the board of what large internet corporation in a deal which saw him cease his fight to oust its leaders? Yahoo
The South Ossetia war was fought between Russia and which other country? Georgia
By how many years to the day did OJ Simpson's conviction for robbery and kidnapping follow his acquittal of murder? Thirteen
The NASA spacecraft Messenger reached what planet destination in 2008? Mercury
Human Rights Watch announced in October 2008 that what country is the world's most ignored tragedy? Somalia
Who in 2008 was re-elected Prime Minister of Canada? Stephen Harper
Who in 2008 was denied parole (again) for the murder of John Lennon? Mark Chapman
George Tupou V was crowned monarch of which country in August 2008? Tonga
Chinese Democracy was the long awaited 2008 album release of which band? Guns N' Roses
Who was Fiona Shackleton representing when she had a jug of water poured over her in February 2008? Paul McCartney
Architect Rafael Viñoly designed what notable Leicester building which opened in 2008? The Curve Theatre
For which national team did the cricketer play who was alleged to have called an Australian opponent a monkey, resulting in the suspension of the Australian tour of that country? India
Which film director, with successes including Cold Mountain and The Talented Mr Ripley, died on 18 March 2008? Anthony Minghella
Which chain announced the closure of 600 US branches in July 2008? Starbucks
In which city did the Newseum museum of news and journalism re-open in April 2008? Washington DC
Who did Portsmouth beat 1-0 to win the FA Cup in May 2008? Cardiff City
Who wrote the much covered and 2008 hit song Hallelujah? Leonard Cohen
On Rudy Giuliani's withdrawal from the contest for the Republican 2008 US presidential election nomination who received Giuliani's endorsement? John McCain
Which original and long lost member of the Manic Street Preachers was declared dead on 24 November 2008? Richey Edwards
What is the name of Google's web browser, launched in September 2008? Google Chrome
Who won the 2008 American (celebrity) Apprentice TV show? Piers Morgan
What 2008 film set in 1880s America starred and was directed by Ed Harris? Appaloosa
Which country won the most medals in total at the 2008 Summer Olympics? USA (110)
In October 2008 which country was first to follow Ireland in announcing it would guarantee all bank deposits, in the wake of the global financial crisis? Greece
Which Eastern guru to the Beatles died on 5 February 2008? Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
What venue hosted the 2008 Superbowl? University of Phoenix Stadium
Which American entertainer famously parodied Sarah Palin during the 2008 US presidential elections? Tina Fey
What hip-hop artist was controversially chosen to headline the 2008 Glastonbury Festival? Jay-Z (that's pronounced Jay-Zee, if saying 'Jay-Zed' is likely to attract a few heckles from the crowd..)
Which American artist noted for his large graffiti-style paintings had a major exhibition at London's Tate Modern in Summer 2008? Cy Twombly (Edwin Parker Twombly Jr)
Who won the UK 2008 Apprentice TV show and the resulting job with Sir Alan Sugar? Lee McQueen
Who starred as Batman in the film Dark Knight? Christian Bale
What was Abdel Kechiche's 2008 film about France's North African community? Couscous
Who ran the fraudulent $50bn investment pyramid scheme, further exposing in December 2008 the stupidity of the world's financial system? Bernard Madoff (what a complete twat - couldn't you just punch that stupid face of his..)
Who released the album Do You Like Rock Music? British Sea Power
Who threw his shoes at George W Bush in December 2008? Muntadhar al Zeidi (similar spellings are acceptable for quiz purposes - Bush said afterwards that he didn't know what the guy's beef was, which just about says everything)
Which club won the Coca Cola Football League Championship for the 2007-08 season? West Bromwich Albion
Who won the UK 2008 X-Factor TV talent show? Alexandra Burke
Which secretive artist's supposed real identity was 'outed' in 2008 as Robert Gunningham by the Mail on Sunday? Banksy
Which rock group won the 2008 Mercury Prize? Elbow (Seldom Seen Kid)
What successful 2008 film starring Angelina Jolie did Clint Eastwood direct? Changeling
Which iconic fashion designer died on 1 June 2008? Yves Saint Laurent
Ari Folman's acclaimed 2008 film was 'Waltz with...' whom? Bashir
Nelson Evora won which country's only gold medal at the 2008 Summer Olympics? Portugal (Triple Jump)
Which scientist and novelist, and author of '2001: A Space Odyssey' died on 19 March 2008? Arthur C Clarke
Which actor was the butt of Jonathan Ross and Russell Brand's prank calls which nearly ended civilisation as we know it in October 2008? Andrew Sachs
Who won 3 gold medals for Great Britain at the 2008 Summer Olympics, and was named 2008 BBC Sports Personality of the Year? Chris Hoy (cycling)
Which country won the 2008 Eurovision Song Contest? Russia (Dima Bilan, with the song 'Believe')
Which country ended its combat role in Iraq on 1 June 2008 with the withdrawal of its 500 troops from Nasiriyah? Australia
What was Julian Schnabel's acclaimed 2008 film of the book written by a stroke victim's blinking eye? The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Who was buried in Donskoy Necropolis on 6 August 2008? Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Which city hosted in 2008 the 65th anniversary of the oldest film festival in the world? Venice
Who won the 2008 Superbowl? New York Giants
Who won best actor at the 80th Academy Awards of 2008? Daniel Day-Lewis (There will be Blood)
Who resigned as Prime Minister of Pakistan on 18 August 2008? Pervez Musharraf
In what city did Barack Obama formally accept the Democratic nomination for the US presidential election? Denver, Colorado
Which driver did Louis Hamilton overtake in the final seconds of the Brazilian Grand Prix to clinch fifth place and thereby win the 2008 F1 Championship? Timo Glock
What were Bertha, Cristobel and Dolly on 20 July 2008? Storms (Bertha was a hurricane; the others were tropical storms)
Which country won the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations (the African international soccer championship)? Egypt (beating Cameroon 1-0)
In which country did the world's largest ferris wheel (as at 2008) open for rides in March 2008? Singapore
Who did the government appoint as executive chairman of Northern Rock after its nationalisation? Ron Sandler
Rail workers in California were banned from doing what on moving trains after a crash was found to have been caused by the activity in September 2008? Using mobile phones
From January 2008 people seeking a visa to visit the UK were required to provide what additional form of identity? Fingerprints
Which company did French president Sarkozy and his then girlfriend Carla Bruni sue in 2008 for unauthorised use of their images in an advert? Ryanair
G Kennedy Thompson was fired in June 2008 from which US bank and early victim of the credit crunch? Wachovia
Nepal re-named a remote airport near Mount Everest as what in February 2008? Tenzing-Hillary Airport
In March 2008 the Shin Bet secret service of what country launched a blog written by four of its agents? Israel
The Detroit Redwings beat the Pittsburgh Penguins to win the 2008 Stanley Cup in which sport? Ice hockey
In March 2008 the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation announced a photographic competition to mark the International Year of the what? Potato
What political correspondent voluntarily removed himself from the UK Strictly Come Dancing celebrity talent show for fear of undersevedly winning it? John Sergeant
Which club won the 2008 Australian Football League Grand Final? Hawthorn
Who won the 2008 French Women's Singles (tennis) Open Championship? Ana Ivanovic
Quentin Bryce became the first woman to hold what office in September 2008? Governor-General of Australia
Which jazz musician and presenter of BBC Radio's I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue died on 25 April 2008? Humphrey Lyttelton
Which UK member of parliament resigned in June 2008 to fight the Haltemprice and Howden election on a civil liberties platform? David Davis
Who won the 2008 American Idol TV talent show? David Cook
In what city did its kingdom's first women-only hotel and spa, called the Luthan, open in March 2008? Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)
Which Indian city organised 'No Honking Day' to mark World Health Day, 7 April 2008, emphasising noise pollution as a significant health issue. Mumbai
What candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2008 US election withdrew from the contest on 10 January 2008? Bill Richardson
Which country did cyclone Nargis devastate on 2 May 2008? Burma
What stadium nicknamed 'The House That Ruth Built' closed in November 2008? Yankee Stadium (New York)
Who did Tiger Woods beat in a play-off for the 2008 US Open Championship? Rocco Mediate
Who led Zimbabwe's Movement for Democratic Change opposition against Robert Mugabe in 2008? Morgan Tsvangirai
Who was the trader alleged to be responsible for the French Société Générale trading loss of nearly five billion euros in January 2008? Jérôme Kerviel
Which two companies agreed in February 2008 to pay their customers $200m compensation for price fixing? Virgin Atlantic and British Airways
How many gold medals did Great Britain win at the 2008 Summer Olympics? 19
A court in which country was reported in March 2008 to have convicted a bear for stealing honey from a beekeeper? Macedonia
Which highly regarded British literary agent died on 20 October 2008? Pat Kavanagh (Patricia Kavanagh)
Put these countries - Mexico, Brazil, India - in order of most gold medals won in the 2008 Summer Olympics. Brazil (3), Mexico (2), India (1)
Famous for his square guitar, which blues musician died on 2 June 2008? Bo Diddley
Which was the only country to win two silver medals and no other medals at the 2008 Summer Olympics? (clue - both medals were won in men's sprint events)Trinidad and Tobago
The sales and reputation of what cheese were affected when toxins were believed to have contaminated buffalo milk? Mozzarella
Put these countries in order of most gold medals won at the 2008 Summer Olympics (i.e., the top six nations in the gold medals table): Australia, China, Russia, USA, Germany, Great Britain. China (51), USA (36), Russia (23), Great Britain (19), Germany (16), Australia (14).
Name the British Airways chief executive who had to do a lot of apologising for the Heathrow Terminal 5 chaos in March 2008? Willie Walsh
Which film star (of Brokeback Mountain fame) died on 22 Jan 2008? Heath Ledger
The European Court of Justice ruled that Marks and Spencer could reclaim £3.5m in 20 years' overpaid vat due to the incorrect categorisation of what product? Teacakes
Which famous artist and and children's book illustrator died on 28 May 2008? Beryl Cook
Which notable CEO stepped down on 27 June 2008 to concentrate on his charity work? Bill Gates
During Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Commons in December 2008 Gordon Brown amusingly and accidentally claimed his government had saved what? (instead of the banking system) The World
quizballs 59 - Big Al's Big Quizballs - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes

This quiz is contributed by Big Al - thank you Al.

If you have corrections please contact quizballs.

By way of appreciation for this Big Quiz contribution Big Al seeks and offers materials for quizzes, especially for picture rounds.

Big Al can be contacted via: almail@pearsongb.co.uk

Question 41 was corrected from 1986 to 1979 - thanks S Curtis - 4 Feb 2009. Questions 91, 98 (spellings/typos - Telly Savalas; Dickens'; Micawber) and answer 56 (spelling - Prima Facie) were corrected - thanks G Heyes - 11 Feb 2009.






Which singer joined Mel Gibson in the movie Mad Max: Beyond The Thunderdome? TINA TURNER
Vodka, Galliano and orange juice are used to make which classic cocktail? HARVEY WALLBANGER
Which American state is nearest to the former Soviet Union? ALASKA
In which year did Foinavon win the Grand National? 1967
At which battle of 1314 did Robert The Bruce defeat the English forces? BANNOCKBURN
Consecrated in 1962, where is the Cathedral Church of St Michael? COVENTRY
On TV, who did the character Lurch work for? ADDAMS FAMILY
Which children's classic book was written by Anna Sewell? BLACK BEAUTY
How many tentacles does a squid have? TEN
Which reggae singing star died 11th May 1981? BOB MARLEY
Characters Charlie Allnut and Rosie Sayer appeared in which classic 1951 movie? THE AFRICAN QUEEN (Humphrey Bogart & Katherine Hepburn)
What is converted into alcohol during brewing? SUGAR
Which river forms the eastern section of the border between England and Scotland? TWEED
Which Briton won an ice-skating Gold at the Lake Placid Olympics? ROBIN COUSINS
In what year was Prince Andrew born? 1960 (19th February)
What is the national game of the Basques? PELOTA (a form of tennis using racket or hand with a net or against a wall)
TV commercials for Campari launched the career of which actress? LORRAINE CHASE
Name the two families in Romeo and Juliet? MONTAGUE & CAPULET
If cats are feline, what are sheep? OVINE
In the song, Heartbreak Hotel is on which street? LONELY STREET
For his part in which 1953 film did Frank Sinatra receive a Best Supporting Actor Oscar? FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
For which fruit is the US state of Georgia famous? PEACH
Which is the financial centre and main city of Switzerland? ZURICH
Who is the only man (at 2009) to have won motorbike and F1 car World Championships? JOHN SURTEES
In which city was Martin Luther King assassinated in 1968? MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE
In which county is the UK prime minister's official country residence Chequers? BUCKINGHAMSHIRE
Who created the UK TV spoof 007 character Basildon Bond? RUSS ABBOTT
What is the policeman's name in Noddy stories? PC PLOD
What is the word used to describe an animal/plant that is both male and female? HERMAPHRODITE
Which TV programme's theme tune was called Hit and Miss? JUKE BOX JURY
In the 1963 film The Great Escape, what names were given to the three tunnels? TOM, DICK, HARRY
What liqueur bearing the letters D.O.M. on the bottle label was developed at Fecamp, France, in the 16th century? BENEDICTINE (DOM = Deo Optimo Maximo = To God, most good, most great.)
What is the third major Balearic Island with Majorca and Minorca? IBIZA
Who won six consecutive Wimbledon singles titles in the 1980s? MARTINA NAVRATILOVA (1982-87, also 1978, 79, 90)
In which country did the Mau Mau uprising (1952-60) occur? KENYA
What does a numismatist study or collect? COINS (and/or Medals)
Who was Radio 1's first female DJ? ANNE NIGHTINGALE
Who captained Jules Verne's submarine Nautilus? CAPTAIN NEMO
The llama belongs to the family of animals commonly called what? CAMELS
Which guitarist is known as Slowhand? ERIC CLAPTON
In which 1979 film was the spaceship called Nostromo? ALIEN
What have been cooked in syrup and glazed to make the sweetmeat Marrons Glaces? SWEET CHESTNUTS
The Shatt-el-Arab (River of Arabia) is the confluence of which two other rivers? TIGRIS and EUPHRATES
The Sheffield Shield is competed for in which sport? CRICKET (Australia)
At which town did Billy Butlin open his first holiday camp? SKEGNESS (1936)
In knitting, what is meant by the initials 'psso'? PASS SLIPPED STITCH OVER
In UK TV's 'Noel Edmund's House Party', the 'house' was situated near to which village? CRINKLEY BOTTOM
Also the title of a famous literary work, who were Mrs Page and Mrs Ford? MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR
What is infant whale commonly called? CALF
Which DJ had a UK Top Ten hit with the song Snot Rap? KENNY EVERETT
In which film did Roger Moore first play James Bond? LIVE AND LET DIE (1973)
How many gallons of beer are in a furkin? NINE
What in Cornwall is the most southerly point of mainland Britain? LIZARD POINT
Alan Minter was undisputed World boxing champion at which weight? MIDDLEWEIGHT
Which 17th century explorer was buried with a pipe and a box of tobacco? SIR WALTER RALEIGH
Which Latin term, usually applied to legal evidence, means 'at first sight'? PRIMA FACIE
What was the character name of TV's 'The Saint'? SIMON TEMPLAR
In literature, who was the best known pupil of Greyfriar's School? BILLY BUNTER
What is the alternative common name for a Black Leopard? PANTHER
Who composed The Wedding March? FELIX MENDELSSHON
Which actor appeared in Papillion and The Great Escape and died in 1980? STEVE MCQUEEN
What do the British call the vegetables that Americans call zucchini? COURGETTES
In which bay is Alcatraz? SAN FRANCISCO BAY
What is the most northerly cricket ground at which a Test Match can (as at 2009) be played? RIVERSIDE (CHESTER-LE-STREET, DURHAM)
Which British general was killed at Khartoum? CHARLES GORDON
Which Cornish village claims to be the birthplace of King Arthur? TINTAGEL
KAR120C was the registration of a yellow Lotus 7, in which 1960s cult UK TV series? THE PRISONER
In which Dicken's novel was Miss Haversham jilted on her wedding day? GREAT EXPECTATIONS
What is an otter's home called? HOLT
Who had a 1985 hit with Saving All My Love For You? WHITNEY HOUSTON
Which actor appeared to have a wooden leg in the 1956 film Moby Dick? GREGORY PECK (Captain Ahab)
How have vegetables been cut which are served Julienne? THIN STRIPS (or shreds or sliced lengthways)
Which mountain overlooks Rio De Janeiro and its harbour? SUGAR LOAF
Who was the first black player to captain England's soccer team? PAUL INCE
In Roman mythology, Neptune is the equivalent to which Greek god? POSEIDON
What is the only English language single word anagram of the word crouton? CONTOUR
Which TV character said, 'Live long and prosper'? MR SPOCK (Star Trek)
Which playwright wrote The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, and The Cherry Orchard? ANTON CHEKOV
What is the other name for Wildebeest? GNU
Who had a 1960s hit with Let's Go To San Francisco? FLOWERPOT MEN
What make of car was the time-machine in the film Back To The Future? DE LOREAN
What is the name given to a locked case in which decanters can be seen but not used? TANTALUS
In which State would you find the city of Birmingham? ALABAMA
Complete the name of the American Football team: 'Washington ...........'? REDSKINS
In which war was the Battle of Bunker Hill fought? AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE
How old is a horse when it changes from a filly to a mare? FOUR YEARS
Which school featured in UK TV's 'Please Sir'? FENN STREET
Robin Hood & Friar Tuck appear in which well-known novel, by Sir Walter Scott? IVANHOE
What is Canada's national animal? BEAVER
Which is the smallest member of the flute family? PICCOLO
Which Bond villain has been played by Telly Savalas, Donald Pleasance, Charles Gray, and Max Von Sydow? BLOFELD (ERNST STAVRO)
'Mace is one of the spices obtained from the tree Myristica Fragrams - what is the other? NUTMEG
Which hills divide England from Scotland? CHEVIOTS
What is the colour of the bull of an archery target? GOLD
Who was the female member of the SDP's 'Gang Of Four'? SHIRLEY WILLIAMS (SDP = Social Democratic Party)
UNHCR is the United Nation's High Commission for what? REFUGEES
Who hosted UK TV's 'Family Fortunes' after Bob Monkhouse and before Les Dennis? MAX BYGRAVES
Which Dickens' character was always 'expecting something to turn up'? MR MICAWBER (David Copperfield)
A palmiped's feet are more commonly called what? WEBBED
Which musical featured the song They Called The Wind Mariah? PAINT YOUR WAGON
quizballs 60 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes
Question 18 was clarified because there are at least two other rivers in Manchester aside from the answer - thanks D Higgins - 16 Apr 2009. The answer to question 8 was corrected (from Sussex) to West Sussex - thanks T Powell - 6 June 2009.




Which US state is named on the label of a Jack Daniels bottle? Tennessee
A phlebotomist extracts what from the human body? Blood
What is the female equivalent of polygamy? Polyandry (many husbands)
How many feet are there in a fathom? Six
Granadilla is another name for which fruit? Passion-fruit
Nariyal is the Indian term for which nut? Coconut
Who was president of Vietnam from 1945-54? Ho Chi Min
In which county of the UK is Bramber Castle? West Sussex
What type of animal was inside Sputnik 2 when launched into orbit in 1957? Dog (called Laika - no, sadly she never made it back..)
Who was the eldest of the Marx Brothers? Chico (real name Leonard Marx)
What type of creature is a dugite? Snake
What are the first names of English novelist G K Chesterton? Gilbert Keith (1874-1936)
In computing what does DMA normally stand for? Direct Memory Access
Who painted The Water Lily Pool? Claude Monet
Which vitamin is also known as pantothenic acid? B5
A couple celebrating their crystal wedding anniversary have been married for how many years? 15 (fifteen)
The song Luck be a Lady features in which musical? Guys and Dolls
In the city of Manchester (England) the Irk and Medlock join which river? Irwell
What type of animal is a Kolinsky? Weasel
Who wrote the book Catch-22? Joseph Heller
Kodiak Island is in which US state? Alaska
In the human body what is the hallux? Big toe
In which year did Henry VIII become King of England? 1509
The 1999 film Tea with Mussolini is based on whose autobiography? Franco Zeffirelli
Port Said is in which North African country? Egypt
In which year were premium bonds first issued in Britain? 1956
Who designed the Beatles Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover? Peter Blake
Madame de Pompadour was the mistress of which French King? Louis XV (fifteenth)
What is the name of Moe's pet cat in the cartoon show The Simpsons? Mr Snookums
Which country is known as the Pearl of Africa? Uganda (supposedly coined by Winston Churchill..)
quizballs 61 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes





What is the theme tune of the US basketball team, the Harlem Globetrotters? Sweet Georgia Brown
Which UK supermaket chain launched a controversial carrier bag with the maxim 'Take an Old Bag Shopping'? Sainsbury's
Which British comedian features in the video game Grand Theft Auto IV? Ricky Gervais
Who was the first British Prime Minister not to have been privately educated? David Lloyd George
Also known as the Pink City, what is the capital of the Indian state Rajasthan? Jaipur
Black Dog and Blind Pew are characters in which novel? Treasure Island (Robert L Stevenson)
A veronique dish is garnished with which fruit? Grapes
What is the oldest trophy in international sport? The Americas Cup (in Sailing - introduced 1851)
In which 1953 film did Marilyn Monroe play gold-digger Lorelei Lee? Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
The London Promenade concerts were founded by which English composer/conductor? Sir Henry Wood (in 1895)
Who captained the West Indies cricket team from 1974-85? Clive Lloyd
Loyola University is in which US city? Chicago
What was singer Tony Bennett's only No1 UK hit single (as at 2009)? Stranger in Paradise (1955)
In the human body what is the innominate bone more commonly known as? Hip bone
Which US singer's real name is Ernest Evans? Chubby Checker
Grosz is the monetary unit of which county? Poland
Who became president of Uganda after Idi Amin was overthrown in 1980? Milton Obote
Which city hosted the 1900 Summer Olympics? Paris
In which decade was third class rail travel re-designated second class on British railways? 1950s (1956)
Clayton Moore and John Hart both played which US TV character? The Lone Ranger
Saarland is an area of which European country? Germany
The Salk vaccine was developed in 1954 to be used against which disease? Polio (properly Poliomyelitis - after Jonus Salk, 1914-95)
The Battle of Balaclava was fought during which war? The Crimean War (October 1854)
What is a Spanish nobleman if the highest rank called? Grandee
Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger founded which website in 2001? Wikipedia
What nationality was guitarist Django Reinhardt? Belgian (1910-53)
In the UK children's TV series Playschool, what was the name of the black doll which replaced Hamble in the 1980s? Poppy
Who wrote the novel The Thirty-Nine Steps? John Buchan
What type of plastic was made from phenol and formaldehyde? Bakelite
In which year was the Berlin Wall built? 1961
quizballs 62 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes



In which country is the city of Stavanger? Norway
Which London Bridge designed by John Rennie was opened in 1817? Waterloo
A drumhead is what type of vegetable? Cabbage
What is the common name for solid carbon dioxide? Dry ice
Who played the Sheriff John T Chance in the 1959 film Rio Bravo? John Wayne
In which European city is the San Vittore women's prison? Milan
A detrusor is a muscle which forms a layer on the wall of which part of the human body? Bladder
What is the score of 40-all called in a game of tennis? Deuce
The July Revolution in 1830 was in which European country? France
Which English poet died of tuberculosis in Rome in 1821? John Keats
Touchstone is a character in which Shakespeare play? As You Like It
What is the name of the strait between Australia and Tasmania? Bass Strait
What were the first names of English novelist H E Bates? Herbert Ernest
Braxy is a fatal bacterial infection in which animal? Sheep
What type of plant is a cholla? Cactus
Which nation was formerly called British Honduras? Belize
Which US lead singer's real name is William Baily? Axl Rose
The Ashmolean Museum is in which British city? Oxford
A Dobro is what type of musical instrument? Guitar (named from the Dopyera Brothers)
How many tiles are in a standard set of dominoes? Twenty-eight
Whose autobiography is entitled Steps in Time? Fred Astaire
The Cullinan Diamond was presented to which British monarch from the people of the Transvaal? Edward the Seventh (on his 66th birthday, November 1907)
Who is the patron saint of England? St George
Which chemical element has the atomic number six? Carbon
Mysophobia is the fear of what? Dirt
The resort of Yalta is in which country? Ukraine
What is the name of the panel used to shield a TV camera lens from direct light, or a microphone from unwanted noise? Gobo
What is the food okra commonly known as? Ladies fingers
What is the capital of Colombia? Bogota (more correctly Bogotá)
Under the British Coal Mines Act of 1911 what age did a pit pony have to be before going underground? Four
quizballs 63 - free general knowledge quiz - questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes


What is TV's Dog Whisperer Cesar Millan's wife's first name? Ilusion
Cartagena is in which South American country? Colombia
What was David Niven's occupation in the 1980 film Rough Cut? Policeman
What type of creature is Junco? Bird
Which pope was the father of Cesare Borgia? Pope Alexander the Sixth
Which show saw Cliff Richard's first TV appearance? Oh Boy! (1958 - he sang Move It.)
Who was the first Roman Catholic US president? John F Kennedy (1961-63)
Toompea Castle is in which European city? Tallin (Estonia)
Bitter Pit is a disease affecting which type of fruit? Apples
Tenzin Gyatso is better known by which name? The Dalai Lama (the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama as at 2009)
Amsterdam Vallon and Bill the Butcher were characters in which 2002 film? Gangs of New York
The Battle of Belleau Wood was fought during which War? World War One (in France, June 1918)
What is the name of each period into which play in a polo game is divided? Chukka
Which Venetian artist painted the Three Ages of Man? Titian
Bright's disease affects which part of the human body? Kidneys
Which was the first European country to abolish slavery? Denmark (1792)
How many episodes were made of the TV series M*A*S*H? 251
What is the eleventh letter of the Greek alphabet? Lambda
What is the projecting piece of a sundial called which shows the time by its shadow? Gnomon
Which author's epitaph is Steel True, Blade Straight? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)
Which US presidents' faces are sculpted on Mount Rushmore? Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson
In which European city did composer Beethoven die? Vienna (1827, aged 56)
Phnom Penh is situated where the Bassac and Tonle Sap rivers join which other major river? The Mekong
What was the second 'Road' film starring Bob Hope and Bing Crosby? The Road to Zanzibar (1941)
Which chemical element has atomic number 12? Magnesium
If a person's birthday falls on December 1st, what is their star sign? Sagittarius
What Latin term is added to a title retained on retirement by a holder of office such as a university professor? Emeritus
In the US what date is the Presidential Inauguration Day? January 20th
In which year did food rationing end in Britain after the Second World War? 1954 (4th July, midnight..)
Reunion Island is in which body of water? Indian Ocean

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